Middleton.   John     - With a distinquished provenance
Five Hundred New Receipts
IN COOKERY, CONFECTIONARY, PASTRY, PRESERVING, CONSERVING, PICKLING; AND THE Several Branches of these ARTS necessary to be known by all good HOUSEWIVES. By JOHN MIDDLETON, Cook to his Grace the late Duke of Bolton. Revised and Recommended by Mr. HENRY HOWARD. LONDON: Printed for THO. ASTLEY, at the Rose against the North Door of St. Paul's. M DCC XXXIV.
FIRST & SOLE EDITION OF 1734. 8vo. Title Page. (i-iv) (1-249) 8pp 'Index' 1p 'Advertisement' Fully bound in contemporary light brown calf (sometime re-laid) with gilt lined borders. Spine with raised bands and faded gilt lines and a green label wit gilt lettering. Internally very clean - almost as new. The paper is unusually thick. With three bookplates, one of which is Claudia Q. Murphy's. A very scarce item.
- There appears to be two types of first issues. This one which is the large and thick papered version. A thinner paper issue also exists. The title page is featured in MacLean's 'Catalogue of Household and Cookery Books 1701-1800' She states that it is her favourite eighteenth century cookery book title page, among all others. It is very distinctly laid out with the printer 'Thomas Astley's' emblem of a Rose featured predominately. (The rose could also be mistaken for an artichoke!) The whole is surrounded by a two line border. This copy was sold, April 19th. 1926, at the auction rooms of Anderson Galleries, New York City, from Claudia Q. Murphy's cookery book collection. It went for $2.50. The sale also featured many other rare items for around the same prices. How one wishes 'time travel' was possible.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10949

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - Signed by Escoffier, unusually in English.
A GUIDE TO MODERN COOKERY
BY A. ESCOFFIER OF THE CARLTON HOTEL WITH PORTRAIT NEW AND REVISED EDITION (with a printer's device and initials M.H.) LONDON WILLIAM HEINEMANN 1909
165x250mm. 1fep. Half title with signature in black ink "To Mr H. Fowler With best Compliments A. Escoffier London 16 Fevrier 1909" (with a very little light foxing). [1] Frontispiece of 'Escoffier' with tissue guard. Title Page. [1] (1)vi-x Preface. (1)xii Contents. (1)xiv-xvi Glossary. (1)1-848. [1p Index] [1] (1)852-891 Index. 1p Advertisements. 1fep. Original clean full green cloth binding with bright gilt writing and tooling on the spine and front cover with a slight rubbing to edges. The gutter inside is split but holding well. All edges green. Internally, clean and bright. Also enclosed is a beautifully produced four page 'Escoffier Ltd' promotional pamphlet and price list for all Escoffier Sauces, and we are also informed the Preparations can be obtained from all high-class Grocers and Stores. It has a fold in the middle and slight browning around the edges.
- The first English edition was published in 1907. This is the 3 imprint and the second English translation of the first French edition of 1903. At that time of publication, Escoffier was Maitre Chef de Cuisine of the Carlton Hotel, Pall Mall, London. His tenure there lasted 20 years, from 1899 - 1919. Nice clean original bound copies with the gilt lettering still bright are very scarce and with the unusual signature and the rare pamphlet - an altogether rare and handsome copy.

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Modern category
ref number: 11124

ANON.       - Very rare.
Adam's Luxury and Eve's Cookery
OR,THE Kitchen-Garden display’d. In Two Parts. 1. Shewing the best and most approved Methods of raising and bringing to the greatest Perfection, all the Products of the Kitchen-Garden; with a Kalendar shewing the different Products of each Month, and the Business proper to be done in it. 11. Containing a large Collections of Receipts for dressing all Sorts of Kitchen Stuff, so as to afford a great Variety of cheap, healthful, and palata-ble Dishes. To which is Added, The Physical Virtues of every Herb and Root. (a line) Designed for the Use of all who would live Cheap, and pre-serve their Health to old Age ; particularly for Farmers and Tradesmen in the Country, who have but small Pieces of Garden Ground, and are willing to make the most of it. (a line) LONDON: Printedc for R. Dobsley, in Pall-Mall ; and Sold by M. Cooper, at the Globe in Pater-noster Row. (a line) MDCCXLIV.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1744. 12mo. Inside-cover with the bookplate of Mary Chadsey. 1fep. Half Title with small thin 1” piece torn from outer edge without loss, also with ownership inscription “Elizabeth Wynn 1761”. [1]. Title page. [1]. The Introduction - (1) with woodcut headpiece, vi – xii, with woodcut tailpiece. (1) Top woodcut border and decorated initial letters, 2-211. The garden Kalendar starts on p 81. The second part starts on p 101. (1)213-216. 2feps with ownership inscription “Gwen Thomas her book – 1774. Bound in modern full brown calf with two-tone panels on boards. Spine with raised bands and red label with gilt lettering and lines. Bottom compartment with gilt date – 1744. The first few leaves slightly browned but overall in very good condition.
- An unusual old cookery book. It has interesting information and very good advice on the first 80 pages on growing all items in the Kitchen garden. Then 20 pages of very precise Kalendar [sic] information. The second section of 110 pages has unusually for the time, good and detailed recipes. Not all recipes are purely vegetarian as some require meat stocks. This is an important item of any collection of early English cookery books. It helps explain why COPAC lists no less than nineteen British libraries holding a copy. Only 3 copies in auction in 30 years. One of which came up twice. Bitting p 514; Cagle p 541; MacLean p 3; Oxford p 74.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11201

Bradley.   Mrs Martha.     - Sole edition.
THE BRITISH HOUSEWIFE
Volume 1. - OR, THE COOK, HOUSEKEEPER’s AND GARDINER’S COMPANION. CALCULATED FOR THE Service both of London and the Country; And directing what is necessary to be done in the Providing for, Conducting, and Managing a Family throughout the Year, CONTAINING A general Account of fresh Provisions of all Kinds, Of the several Articles for the Table, pickled, or otherwise preserved; and the different Kinds of Spices, Salts, Sugars, and other Ingredients used in Pickling and Preserving at Home; Shew-ing what each is, whence it was bought, and what are its Qualities and Uses. Together with the Nature of all Kinds of Foods, and the Methos of suiting them to different CONSTITUTIONS; A Bill of Fare for each Month, the Art of Marketing and choosing fresh Provisions of all Kinds; and the making as well as chusing of Hams, Tongues, and other Store Dishes. Also Directions for plain Roasting and Boiling; and for the Dressing of all Sorts of Made Dishes in various Tastes; and the preparing the Desert in all its Articles. Containing a great Variety than was ever before publish’d, of the most Elegant, yet the least Expensive Receipts in COOKERY, PASRTRY, PUDDINGS, PRESERVES, PICKELS, FRICASSES,RAGOUTS, SOUPS, SAUCES, JELLIES, TARTS, CAKES, CREAMS, CUSTARDS, CANDIES, DRY’D FUITS, SWEETMEATS, MADE WINES, CORDIALS, and DISTILLARY. To which is annexed, The Art of Carving; and the Terms used for cutting up various Things; and the polite and easy Manner of doing the Honours of the Table: The Whole Prac-tice of Pickling and Preserving: And of preparing made Wines, Beer, Cyder.As also of distilling all the useful Kinds of Cordial and Simple Waters. With the Conduct of a Family in Respect of Health; the Disorders to which they are every Month liable, and the most approved Remedies for each. And a Variety of other valuable Particulars, necessary to known in All Families; and nothing inserted but what has been approved by EXERIENCE. Also the Ordering of all Kinds of profitable Beats and Fowls, With respect their Choice, their Breeding and Feeding; the Diseases to which they are severally laible each Month, and Receipts for their Cure. Together with the Management of the pleasant, profitable, and useful Garden. THE WHOLE Embellished with a great Number of curious COPPER PLATES, shewing the Manner of Trussing of all Kinds of Game, wild and tame Fowls, &c. as also the Order of setting out Tables for Dinners, Suppers, and Great Entertainments, in the Method never before attempted; and by which even those who cannot read will be able to instruct themselves. ( a line) Mrs MARTHA BRADLEY, late of BATH; Being the result of upwards of Thirty Years Experience. (a line) The whole (which is deduc’d form Practice) compleating the careful Reader, from the highest to the lowest Degree, in every Article of English Housewifery. LONDON: Printed for S. Crowder and H. Woodgate, at the Golden Ball in Paternoster Row. Circa1756. -- Volume 2. - THE BRITISH HOUSEWIFE OR, THE COOK, HOUSEKEEPER’s AND GARDINER’S COMPANION. CALCULATED FOR THE Service both of London and the Country; And directing what is necessary to be done in the Providing for, Conducting, and Managing a Family throughout the Year, CONTAINING A general Account of fresh Provisions of all Kinds, Of the several Articles for the Table, pickled, or otherwise preserved; and the different Kinds of Spices, Salts, Sugars, and other Ingredients used in Pickling and Preserving at Home; Shew-ing what each is, whence it was bought, and what are its Qualities and Uses. Together with the Nature of all Kinds of Foods, and the Methods of suiting them to different CONSTITUTIONS; A Bill of Fare for each Month, the Art of Marketing and choosing fresh Provisions of all Kinds; and the making as well as chusing of Hams, Tongues, and other Store Dishes. Also Directions for plain Roasting and Boiling; and for the Dressing of all Sorts of Made Dishes in various Tastes; and the preparing the Desert in all its Articles. Containing a great Variety than was ever before publish’d, of the most Elegant, yet the least Expensive Receipts in COOKERY, PASRTRY, PUDDINGS, PRESERVES, PICKELS, FRICASSES,RAGOUTS, SOUPS, SAUCES, JELLIES, TARTS, CAKES, CREAMS, CUSTARDS, CANDIES, DRY’D FUITS, SWEETMEATS, MADE WINES, CORDIALS, and DISTILLARY. To which is annexed, The Art of Carving; and the Terms used for cutting up various Things; and the polite and easy Manner of doing the Honours of the Table: The Whole Prac-tice of Pickling and Preserving: And of preparing made Wines, Beer, Cyder.As also of distilling all the useful Kinds of Cordial and Simple Waters. With the Conduct of a Family in Respect of Health; the Disorders to which they are every Month liable, and the most approved Remedies for each. And a Variety of other valuable Particulars, necessary to known in All Families; and nothing inserted but what has been approved by EXERIENCE. Also the Ordering of all Kinds of profitable Beats and Fowls, With respect their Choice, their Breeding and Feeding; the Diseases to which they are severally laible each Month, and Receipts for their Cure. Together with the Management of the pleasant, profitable, and useful Garden. THE WHOLE Embellished with a great Number of curious COPPER PLATES, shewing the Manner of Trussing of all Kinds of Game, wild and tame Fowls, &c. as also the Order of setting out Tables for Dinners, Suppers, and Great Entertainments, in the Method never before attempted; and by which even those who cannot read will be able to instruct themselves. (a line) Mrs MARTHA BRADLEY, late of BATH; Being the result of upwards of Thirty Years Experience. (a line) VOL.II. (a line) The whole (which is deduc’d from Practice) compleating the careful Reader, from the highest to the lowest Degree, in every Article of English Housewifery. LONDON: Printed for S. Crowder and H. Woodgate, at the Golden Ball in Paternoster Row. Circa1756.
FIRST and SOLE EDITION in book form. 8vo. Two volumes. Vol. I – 2feps. [1] Frontispiece of a kitchen declaring – Frontispiece of the Compleat English Cook. Title page. [1] 3-752. 5 Ornately engraved plates. 2 feps. -- Vol. II. 2 feps with ink inscription ‘M. Bache Wyken 1794.’ Title page. [1] 1-469. Contents to the First Volume (ix). Index for the First Volume (xii). Contents to the Second Volume (v). Index for the second volume (vii). 7 plates depicting settings for various dinners and a wedding and one for trussing. 2 feps. The five plates bound in Volume I are duplicated plus two others in Volume II. Both volumes in full original calf, slightly worn with nice patina and with repairs and neatly re-backed in the old style with raised bands and red morocco labels. Some wear and damp staining to both volumes, small amount of worming to bottom margin of Volume I and title page of Volume 11 cropped on the bottom but text still visible. Mainly the contents are clean and tight. A nice set. For a fuller account of the dating of this work see Gilly Lehmann's introduction to the facsimile edition published by Prospect Books, 1996, see also Cagle 401-2.
- MacLean located an advertisement in ‘Scots Magazine’, January 1756 announcing the “British Housewife, No 1, To be continued weekly, 3d. Crowder.” While no copy has survived unbound in parts, part numbers 1-XLI are designated in the signatures. If the weekly schedule was maintained, publication would have been completed late in 1756. [Cagle p 402] Martha Bradley’s directions and style is straightforward and factual. She writes well. She endeavours to help the cook and housewife better than had previously been attempted. There are no glossy photographs to beguile the reader, however there are handsome etched plates showing how to set a fine table. Today, the abundance available to us all year round makes us forget the limits of that times and what the seasons allowed. For example, a winter table for twelve persons could have seven dishes placed on the table. February and March became the months when pickled and preserved foods provided the only variety. Then spring was the time to sow seasonal crops for future bounty. One of the etched plates shows an abundant table in July; the first course has seven plates laid out simultaneously and the second course another ten different dishes. An ostentatious display and one wonders what family and household’s position in society is the norm for a dinner like this. Gastronomically, seasons do not affect us anymore. Today our menus can include anytime, a plethora of tropical fruits, fresh vegetables, fish and meats, flown in bi-weekly from all over the globe. As the title states, Bradley’s instructions for the running of the household from the marketing and providing of the kitchen month by month, the garden, the still-room, the brewery, the stables, the disorders of many types of animals and their remedies etc. It is clear that the author wrote the recipes from her experience in the kitchen and she is absolutely clear and firm that they should be carried out as laid down by her instructions. She is adamant that vegetables should not be over boiled, there are strict rules on the poaching of eggs: 'This is the true way ... our People all mistake it, they let the Eggs boil.... Although little is known about her other than she is believed to have been a professional cook,with 'thirty years experience' (as stated on her title page) Bradley favoured the newest French cooking style of the 1730’s which featured light, clean flavours, but was not above preferring a ‘plain’ English recipe if she felt it was better. She borrowed heavily from other cookbooks but always improved the recipes in some way, often providing insightful comments and offering balanced appraisals of the merits of one dish versus another. A very desirable set that stands out in any collection.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11202

Kitchiner.   William     - The rare first with a letter signed by Kitchener
APICIUS REDIVIVUS; OR, THE COOK'S ORACLE:
Wherein especially THE ART OF COMPOSING SOUPS, SAUCES, AND FLAVOURING ESSENCES IS MADE SO CLEAR AND EASY, BY THE QUANTITY OF EACH ARTICLE BEING ACCURATELY STATED BY WEIGHT AND MEASURE, THAT EVERY ONE MAY SOON LEARN TO DRESS A DINNER, AS WELL AS THE MOST EXPERIENCED COOK; Being Six Hundred Receipts, THE RESULT OF ACTUAL EXPERIMENTS INSTITUTED IN THE KITCHEN OF A PHYSICIAN, FOR THE PURPOSE OF COMPOSING A CULINARY CODE FOR THE RATIONAL EPICURE, AND AUGMENTING The Alimentary Enjoyments of Private Families; COMBINING ECONOMY WITH ELEGANCE; SAVING EXPENSE TO HOUSEKEEPERS, AND TROUBLE TO SERVANTS. "I have taken as much pains in describing, in the fullest manner, how to make, in the easiest, most agreeable, and the most economical way, those Dishes which con-tribute to the comforts of the middle rank of Society, as I have in directing the preparation of those piquante and elaborate relishes, the most ingenious accom-plished "Officers of the Mouth" have invented for the amusement of Grands Gourmands. These are so composed, as to be as agreeable and useful to the stomach, as they are inviting to the appetite; nourishing without being inflammatory, and savoury without being surfieting" - vide PREFACE. page 3. LONDON; PRINTED FOR SAMUEL BAGSTER, NO.15, PATERNASTER-ROW, By J. Moyes, Grenville Street. 1817.
FIRST EDITION: 154x98mm. Unpaginated -- [a-b]12 [c]2 [B-Q]12 [R]4 - 210 Leaves. Four engraved plates. two with illustrations, two with text, describing quartering the ox, the calf, the sheep and the pig. With 2 feps. A good clean copy with some small ink stains on the Title page. Some manuscript notes on margins of Preface Page. Full dark brown nineteenth century calf with neat cross checked blind tooling with gilt lines at the edges. The spine with early elaborate gilt tooling sometime neatly re-laid. With a dark red label and gilt lettering. There are some ink marks to the title page that do not detract also some manuscript notes on the next page that do not affect the text. A nice copy of the very scarce 1st edition, elevating it to rarity with the topical letter signed by Kitchiner.
- The autograph letter signed 'Wm. Kitchiner', to 'My dear friend' thanking him for his zeal on behalf of Mr Harris. He goes on --- "You will be glad to hear that your old friend 'The Cook's Oracle' has recovered a state of health that he hardly ever hoped for, and in the course of this next week will pay a visit to Longmans about your book" Dated 8th Oct 1826. Measuring 4x3" x 2 folding pages, in good condition, with a newspaper advertisement for Ude's 'The French Cook.'

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10970

Farley.   John     - The rare first edition
The London Art of Cookery,
AND HOUSEKEEPER'S COMPLETE ASSISTANT. On a NEW PLAN. Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of every HOUSEKEEPER, COOK, and SERVANT in the Kingdom. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for the Choice of all Kinds of Provisions. Roasting and Boiling all Sorts of Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes. Made Dishes, Ragouts, and Fricasses. All Sorts of Pies and Puddings. Proper Instruction for dressing of Fruits and Vegetables. Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. The Prepeartion of Hmas, Tongues, and Bacon. The whole Art of Confectionary. Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries. Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies. Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To which is added, AN APPENDIX, Cotaining Considerations on Culinary Poisins; Directions for making Broths, &c. for the Sick; a List of Things in Season in the different Months of the Year; Marketing Tables, &c. &c. Embeliched with A HEAD of the AUTHOR, and a Bill of Fare for every Month in the Year, elegantly engraved on Thirteen Copper-plates. By JOHN FARLEY, PRINCIPAL COOK AT THE LONDON TAVERN. LONDON: Printed for JOHN FEILDING, No.23, Pater-noster Row; and J. SCAT-CHERD and J. WHITTAKER, No.12, Ava Maria Lane, 1783. [Price Six Shillings Bound.]
FIRST EDITION. 1783. 3feps. [1]Engraved Frontispiecs of Farley - Publish'd Jan 1. 1783 ---. Title page. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface with facsimile signature of Farley. (1)viii-xx Contents. 12 engraved plates of Bills of Fare. (1)2-455. 456-459 Marketing Table. [1] 3feps. Full dark brown modern calf with blind tooling to the edge of the boards. The spine with raised bands and panels with gilt dentelles and enclosed gilt lines. Two labels, one red, one green with gilt writing. Water stains to the frontis and title page not affecting the text, nor Farley's portrait. Otherwise very clean internally. A lovely copy.
- Towards the end of the eighteenth century, large taverns had become fashionable banqueting places for gentlemen in London. This was reflected by their chefs and their published cookery books; This book by John Farley, Principal Cook at the London Tavern. Also Richard Brigg’s, ‘The English Art of Cookery’ from the Globe Tavern, Fleet St, the White Hart Tavern, Holburn and at the Temple Coffee House. Not forgetting Francis Collingwood and John Woolams, ‘The Universal Cook,’ from the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand. Farley's place of employment, The London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street was the largest restaurant and banqueting facility in the City. It held functions for up to two thousand five hundred people at a sitting. In E. Callow's book on 'Old London Taverns - 1901 & J. Timbs 'Clubs of London' 1872, we learn that the establishment was 'par excellence' and the 'temple of gastronomy' in London. It did not have a bar nor coffee house, with a facade so large and discreet that many people thought it was the Bank of England. It had a prodigious cellar that stretched to both sides lengthways, even under the neighbouring buildings and far out in the front under Bishopsgate Street itself. It held among its huge stock hundreds of barrels of Porter, butts of Sherry, 4,300 dozen bottles of port, 1,200 dozen Champagne, walls of bottled Claret six deep, etc etc. We are informed that the floors of the cellars were a river of sawdust. Also in a huge tank in the cellar that occupied a whole vault, we find two tons of live turtle. We are informed that they can keep in excellent condition for three months if kept in the same water in which they were brought to the country. We learn that to change the water to that available here lessens the weight and flavour of the Turtle. We can find in Farley's book tips and information on how he grew mushrooms in the cellars. What a place to work! The kitchen brigade must have been huge, the wage bill for the whole Tavern - a small fortune each week. In PPC 42 & 43, Fiona Lucraft lays out a very comprehensive and compelling piece of research that rightly condemns Farley of devious and outright plagiarism and proves that most of The London Art of Cookery has been taken straight from the cookery books of Hannah Glasse and Elizabeth Raffald. Nevertheless one gets a sense from Farley’s book that he was a very good professional cook proud of his high standards. He is one of the first English cooks to express (so typical of the French for more than a century) a continuing need for progress and improvement in the culinary arts. Farley in his introduction states with some pride that -- 'Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and, though the Cooks of the last Century boasted of having brought it to the highest Pitch it could bear, yet we find that daily improvements are still making therein, which must be the Case of every Art depending on Fancy and Taste: ---’ Farley appears to have very high standards of cleanliness and safety, repeatedly stressing in his book, the need for saucepans to be both clean and well tinned and he has an appendix on ‘culinary poisons’, particularly the risk of copper poisoning, which can happen when the tin wears down and exposes foodstuffs to the copper underneath. Whatever Fiona Lutcraft's excellent article in PPC proves, this is still an exceptional cookery book and gives a very good idea of the foods and dishes available at a highly reputed establishment. One has to assume that as Farley brought out his very popular book that ran to many editions, albeit, some of it plagarised, he also cooked and served a large percentage of the recipes at The London Tavern. As a footnote; the first luxury restaurant to open in Paris paid homage to Farley’s place of work. In 1782 - ‘La Grande Taverne de Londres,’ was founded. The owner, Antoine Beauvilliers, a leading culinary writer and gastronomic authority, later wrote L’Art du cuisinier (1814), a cookbook that became a standard work on French culinary art. This book on offer here is the extremely rare first edition, and is equally as rare as the first editions of Glasse and Raffald.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11035

Dalrymple.   George     - A sole edition. Very scarce
The Practice of Modern Cookery;
ADAPTED TO FAMILIES OF DISTINCTION, As well as to those of The MIDDLING RANKS of LIFE. To which is added, A GLOSSARY explaining the Terms of Art. By GEORGE DALRYMPLE, Late Cook to Sir John Whitefoord, Bart. EDINBURGH: Printed for the Author. Sold by C.ELLIOT, Edinburgh; and T.LONGMAN, London. MDCCLXXXI.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1781. 1fep. Title page. [1] 1p Dedication to Lady Whitefoord. [1] 1+vi Preface. 1+2-462. 1+464 Glossary of Terms. 1+466-475 Index. 1p Errata. 1fep. Title page evenly browned. Some minor foxing and staining to first six leaves. Some very light age browning throughout. Original dark brown sheep boards. Modern sympathetically rebound dark brown spine with raised bands and blind tooling. A dark brown label with gilt lettering and lines.
- George Dalrymple provides us with around one thousand recipes, giving them both English and French names. He is also one of the first cookery writers to give a glossary of terms. These points are remarkable according to Maclean. In his preface Dalrymple explains "there are a number of excellent receipts I have had occasionally from others..." – Maclean may be rather less enthused had she realised that Dalrymple plagiarized many of the recipes from the Frenchman Bernard Clermont’s cookery book, ‘The Professed Cook.’ – first edition, 1755. (which in turn is a translation of Menon’s French work ‘Les Soupers de la Cour). George Dalrymple had been cook to Sir John Whitfoord and the book is dedicated to his wife. Sir John Whitfoord, third baronet, lived in Whitefoord House in the Canongate of Edinburgh. Whitfoord is supposed to have been the original of Sir Arthur Wardour in Scott's 'Antiquary' and was one of the early partrons of Burns who celebrated him in verse and who made his daughter Maria [Cranstoun] the heroine of the 'Braes of Ballochmyle'. He was a very well-known figure in the Scottish capital and was depicted in Kay along with his cronies, Major Andrew Fraser and the Hon. Andrew Erskine (Edinburgh Portraits, 1877, no. cxcii). Thus it can be assumed that Dalrymple had cooked for the great and the good of mid-seventeenth century Edinburgh. This is a sole edition and uncommon in most cookery book collections. An interesting read also. Vicaire 244; Oxford p.113; Bitting p.114; Cagle 640; Maclean p.37; Lehmann p.141.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11036

Salmon.   William     - The very scarce first edition of 1695.
The Family Dictionary; or Houshold Companion:
Wherein Alphabetically laid down Exact Rules and ChoicePhysical RECEIPTS FOR The Preservation of Health, Prevention of Sickness, and Curing the several Diseases, Distempers, and Grievences, incident to Men, Women, and Children. Also, Directions for Making Oils, Ointements, Salves, Cordial-Waters, Powders, Pills, Bolus's, Lozenges, Chymical Pre-parations, Physical-Wines, Ales, and other Liquors, &c. and Descriptions of the Virtues of Herbs, Fruits, Flowers, Seeds, Roots, Barks, Minerals, and Parts of Living Crea-tures, Used in Medicinal Potions, &c. Likewise, Directions for Cookery, in Dressing Flesh, Fish, Fowl, Seasoning, Garnishing Sauces, and Serving-up in the Best and most acceptable Manner. The Whole ART of Patry, Conserving, Preserving, Candying, Confectionary &c. Also, The Way of Making all sorts of Perfumes, Beautifying-Waters, Pomatums, Washes, Sweet-Balls, Sweet-Bags, and Essences: Taking Spots, and Stains out of Garments, Lin-nen, &c. and Preserving them form Moths, &c. Wash-ing, or Brightning Tarnished Gold, or Silver Lace, Plate, &c. Together, With the Art of Making all sorts of English Mead, Metheglin, &c. And the ART of Fining, and Recovering Foul or Faded Wines. The MYSTERY of Pickling, and Keeping all Sorts of Pickles throughout the Year. To Which is Added, as an APPENDIX, The Explanation of Physical Terms, Bills of Fare in all Sea-sons of the Year. With the ART of CARVING. And many other Useful Matters. By J.H. London, Printed for W. Rhodes, at the Star, the Corner of Bride-Lane, in Fleetstreet, 1695.
FIRST EDITION. 12vo. 1fep. (missing first blank) Title page, slightly brittle at edges with no loss. On verso - Licensed, February the 28th 1695. 5p Preface. [1] AC-YO. (no page numbers, but complete.) 16p Appendix. 2fep. (one original) Pages uniformly age browned throughout. One page 'BL' has a 4" strip of the border with a very small loss of text. With modern full dark tan calf, with double fillets on the boards. Raised bands with blind tooled lines. With red label with gilt writing.
- Dr William Salmon, a noted Empiric, born 2nd of June 1644. According to an inscription under his portrait in ‘Ars Anatomica’, he studied and wrote a profusion of books on medicine, surgery, anatomy, pharmacology, astronomy, gardening, cookery, astrology, religion and translated several Latin medical classics into English. Salmon used the title of MD on his title pages, but according to Stanley H. Johnston, Jr., Curator of Rare Books at The Holden Arboretum, "most writers doubt that he was entitled to it. He still is somewhat difficult to assess since he is known to have amassed a 3,000 volume library containing many of the medical classics and produced several medical publications that were sufficiently erudite that his critics have claimed they were ghost-written for him." Rupert Halliwell at SimsReed Rare Books in London describes Salmon as a "learned man, with a taste for the obscure" and notes that his library, auctioned off after his death, "contained works in French, Greek, Latin and Hebrew, on medicine and other subjects." But his enemies asserted that his earliest education was from a charlatan with whom he travelled, and whose business he eventually inherited. And he seems ill-inclined to prove them wrong. He lived at a time long before hospitals had out-patient facilities. At this time "irregular practitioners" frequently lived near the gates of St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London. Their patients were those who could not or would not be admitted to the hospital. Salmon thus set up his stall near the Smithfield gate of St. Bartholomew's. It was there he "treated all diseases, sold special prescriptions of his own, as well as drugs in general, cast horoscopes, and professed alchemy," according to Norman Moore in his article about Salmon in the OUP's Dictionary of National Biography. Always game to write something different, in 1696, he published one of England's first cookery books. ‘The Family-Dictionary, or, Houshold Companion’. This volume is both a cookery book and a compendium of information for the home-maker, very much like the Household books of Isabella Beeton. It was meant to be the only household reference a housewife would need. Here is Salmon's very elegant recipe for Black-Pudding with no starch at all; To make this the best, and fare exceeding the common way. Boil the Umbles of a Hog tender, take some of the Lights [lungs] with the Heart, and all the Flesh about them, taking out the Sinews, and mincing the rest very small; do the like by the Liver: add grated Nutmeg, four or five Yolks of Eggs, a pint of Sweet Cream, a quarter of a pint of Canary [wine], Sugar, Cloves, Mace and Cinnamon finely powdered, a few Carraway-seeds, and a little Rose-water, a pretty quantity of Hog-fat, and some Salt: roul it up about two Hours before you put it into the Guts, then put it into them after you have rinsed them in Rose-water. The alphabetical format of Salmon's book is very strict so that the topic that immediately precedes ‘Black-Pudding’ is ‘Biting by a Snake, Adder, or Mad Dog.’ William Salmon’s name only appeared on the second edition, corrected and much enlarged of 1696 and with no mention of the J.H. on the title page of this copy. Oxford p45, cites the first of 1795; MacLean p128, the 4th of 1710 and a 4th with additions of 1734; Bitting p416, has the 1st and the 3rd of 1705. Cagle pp 706-707, cites the 1st and the 4th of 1710.

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ref number: 11021

Coghan.   Thomas    
THE HAVEN OF HEALTH.
Cheifely gathered for the comfort of Students, and consequently of all those that have a care of their health; amplified upon five words of Hypocrates, written Epid.6. Labor, Cibus, Potie, Somnus, Venus. Hereunto is added, a preservation form the Pestilence, with a short censureof the late sickness in Oxford. By Thomas Coghan, Master of Arts, and Bachelor of Physicke. Ecclesiasicus oap.37.30. By surfeit have many perished: but he that dieteth himselfe prolongeth his life. The fourth Edition, corrected and amended. LONDON, Printed by Anne Griffin, for Roger Ball, and are to be sold at his shop without Temple-barre, at the Golden Anchor next the Nags-head Taverne. 1636.
Small 4to. 2feps with bookplates of Aldenham and W.G. Peene. Title page. [1] 8p Epistle Dedicatorie. 6p To the Reader. 1+2-321. [1] 22p The Table. 2feps. Modern quarter calf with marbled boards, slightly rubbed. Spine with gilt lines and black label with gilt lettering. Title page age darkened. Some soiling and marginal damp-staining. C1 defective with lower outer portion torn. Closed tear to E4. Lower outer corner of H3 torn without loss of text. Final leaf (V4) slightly damp frayed and with two small worm holes affecting lettering of final line of recto. Small neat scattered pencil marginalia throughout especially on the feps.
- The first printed English cookery book, the ‘Boke of Cokery’ produced by Pynson in 1500, was based on 15th-century texts. There was no immediate rush to print cookery books; what did appear were books of advice on diet and health, and on household and estate management, two areas which are often associated with receipts in medieval manuscripts. The best known of the first type are Sir Thomas Elyot’s 'Castel of Health'. 1539, and Andrew Boorde’s ‘Dyetary of Health’ circa 1542. The two books are remarkably similar, giving advice on healthy lifestyle based on Galen, although both authors offer comments on what is suitable for Englishmen, thus adapting Galenic theory to their readers. Thomas Coghan, a later rival to these authors, based his 'Haven of Health' (1584) on Elyot, but changed the order of his book to follow Hippocrates rather than Galen, and supplied a much more extensive commentary on a wider variety of herbs than the earlier writer. In these texts one can begin to discern signs of change at the dinner-table, with Elyot’s remarks on the wholesomeness of beef for the healthy Englishman, and with Coghan’s comments on salads, eaten at the beginning of the meal, and on apple tarts, eaten at the end. The second type of publication is best represented by Thomas Tusser’s doggerel writings, ‘A Hundreth Good Pointes of Husbandrie’ 1557, expanded to 'Five Hundreth Points' in 1573. The expanded version gives advice to housewives, stressing their role as providers of care and medicines for the sick, as well as managers of the daily routine of the household. Thomas Coghan advised students to breakfast on light, digestible foods, to avoid overloading the stomach with a variety of meats at one meal, to cut down on salt and to drink milk as a counteractant to melancholy. He recognized that excessive study made students prone to mental breakdown and recommended that they take regular breaks from study to avoid exhausting their mental energy, and that they refresh their minds with recreations such as music or games” (Norman 493). “It is a book of good sense… By the use of ‘one dish onely at one meale, and drinking thereto but small drinke’ he became slender” (Osler 2331). Coghan divided preventative health into five categories: labor or exercise of body and mind, eating, drinking, sleeping and sexual relations. Includes recipes for a variety of healthy drinks, including aqua vitae, rofa solis, cinnamon water, wormwood wine and buttered beer. Norman 493. STC 5481. Lowndes, 487. See Cagle 621-22, Osler 2331-33, Walleriana 2036.

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ref number: 11045

Collingwood. F   and Woolams. J.     - The very rare first edition.
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light Repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. The various Articles in CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. Together with Directions for Baking Bread, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. Besides a Variety of USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. The Whole Embellished with The Heads of the Authors, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year, and proper Subjets for the Improvement of the Art of Carving, elegantly engraved on fourteen Copper-Plates. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, AND JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand, Late from the London Tavern. LONDON: PRINTED BY R. NOBLE, FOR J. SCATCHERD AND J. WHITAKER, NO. 12, AVE-MARIA-LANE. 1792.
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. 2feps with 2 previous owners signatures. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 2p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month, with each verso blank. (curiously they have been bound in out of monthly order. All are present). (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue of seasonal articles. 445-451 Marketing Tables. 2feps. Original full dark calf covered boards with blind tooled lines on the boards. The spine with blind tooled lines. With a dark red label and gilt lettering. Overall has a nice patina. Besides very light age browning to frontispiece and plates , the text block is very clean. Overall, a nice copy.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams were the Principal cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern on the south side of the Strand, London WC1. Strype the historian informs us, that in 1729 an original tavern called the Crown occupied the same site. The Anchor was added to the name shortly after that date, in honour of St Clements Church nearby; an anchor being the emblem of the patron saint who suffered his martyrdom by being cast into the sea with an anchor tied to his neck. The site began a few doors down Arundel St. and extended to Milford Lane. It had an entrance from the Strand thro’ a narrow courtyard. The tavern was very famous and very well frequented by the rich, famous and important members of English high society. Dr Johnson made it his second home. Taking his daily walks with his friend Boswell past Temple Bar, going westward, the Crown and Anchor was their port of call and also of many of their confreres. It was here that Dr Jonson’s famous spat with Percy took place. The Academy of Music was first started at the Tavern. The house was pulled down in 1790 and rebuilt. A very large banqueting room was erected, measuring 85x36 feet, and when packed could hold 2500 guests. It was first opened on the occasion of a birthday dinner given to Charles James Fox, M.P. and presided over by the Duke of Norfolk. The room was used for fine balls and political meetings of both the Tories and radical Parties; anyone in fact who could pay the high prices. The Tavern became the headquarters of one party or another during the Westminster parliamentary elections. It is recorded that Daniel O’Conner M.P., Brougham Cobbet, Sir Francis Burdett and others, held meetings that always crowded the room. After the 1790 rebuild, the first landlord was a famous, very large obese man; Thomas Simkin. He famously died by leaning on the upstairs banister, and calling down some instructions, the banister gave way under his huge weight and he toppled to his death below. The Tavern had elegant booths opened for their customers at the courses during the racing season and the main fairs. As well as refreshments they also held dances. Sadly, in 1854 the Tavern burned down. Afterwards the Duke of Norfolk built Arundel House on the site and further afield. This great Tavern is the establishment where Collingwood and Woollams established their substantial reputation. They had the unique distinction of having this first edition of 1792; ‘The Universal Cook’, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. This book is a record of professional 18th century English gastronomy, as opposed to the cookery books written for the housewife. As can be read on the title page, it has extensive instructions for all the tasks undertaken in such an important Tavern and its Kitchen. The equally rare second edition was published in 1797 with very little change; see item ref #: 11131. See also, item ref #: 11035 for a rare dinner invitation to the Crown and Anchor Tavern when Collingwood and Woolllams were the head cooks.

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ref number: 11227