Mollard.   John    
The Art of Cookery
MADE EASY AND REFINED; COMPRISING AMPLE DIRECTIONS FOR PREPARING EVERY ARTICLE REQUISITE FOR FURNISHING THE TABLES OF THE NOBLEMAN, GENTLEMAN, AND TRADESMAN. BY JOHN MOLLARD. THIRD EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR; AND SOLD BY HIM, No 42, DOVER-STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS; AND J. RIDGWAY, No 170, PICCADILLY. 1807. Price 7s. 6d. T. Gillet Printer, Wild Court, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
12mo. 3feps. Title page. [1] 1p Dedication to Proprietor of The London Tavern. [1] (1)vi-viii. 16p Contents. 12 Plates of Monthly Table Settings. (1)2-211. [1] 3feps. Modern dark brown half calf with marbled boards. Mild foxing throughout.
- This 1807, 3rd edition of John Mollard's 'Art of Cookery' is an interesting read. First published in 1801 and running to five editions by 1836 it gives many unusual recipes. Here from the 1836 edition is Mollard's and the English take on ‘pilaf’ (or pillaw or pilau), -- 'Pilau Of Rice: Wash, pick, and boil a pound of rice in plenty of water till half done, with a dozen of whole cardamom seeds; then drain it, pick out the seeds, and put the rice into a stewpan, with three quarters of a pound of fresh butter and some pounded mace, and salt. Cut a loin of house lamb, or some fresh pork, into small pieces; put them into a frying-pan, add a small quantity of cinnamon, cloves, cummin and cardamum seeds pounded and sifted, with a bit of butter and some Cayenne pepper, and fry the meat till half done. Then add two bay leaves, and four good sized onions sliced, to a pint and a half of veal broth; boil them till tender and rub them through a tamis cloth or sieve. Then boil the liquor over a fire till reduced to half a pint, and add it to the fried meat and spices, together with some peeled button onions boiled. Place some of the rice at the bottom of another stewpan, then a layer of meat and onions on the rice, and so on alternately till the whole is put in. Cover the pan close, set it in a moderately heated oven for two hours and a half, and when to be served, turn the rice out carefully on a dish'. In preparation, because of the addition of meat, this is more of a Briyani than a Pilau. One wonders how separate the rice grains will be after 2 1/2 hours in the oven. Mollard's recipe for Twelfth Cake is the earliest known, and makes a large yeast-leavened bun, more like a stollen than a rich English fruit cake of the kind we now associate with Christmas. Cakes of this kind were usually baked in wooden hoops, or garths. Twelfth cakes were iced with almond paste or sugar icing and ornamented with sugar-paste crowns and/or small sugar or wax sculptures of Twelfth Day characters. It is fascinating that there is not a single mention of vanilla, chocolate, or tomatoes in over 210 pages: sweets are all based on custard or fruit, and the ketchups are made from mushrooms or walnuts. With the three quarters of a pound of butter to a pound of rice required for the Pilau above, one assumes in the guests - bull-like constitutions. Truly the cooking of a different age.!

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11062