Toklas   Alice B.     - with the famous 'Haschich Fudge' recipe.
The Cook Book
ILLUSTRATIONS BY SIR FRANCIS ROSE. (Printers device of a mermaid) London. MICHAEL JOSEPH
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1954. 8vo. Illustrated cartographic paste-down and end-paper. [1] Half title. [2] Frontispiece drawing of Toklas. Title page. Printers info. page. 1p Contents. [1] ix-xi A Word with Cook. [1] (2)3-280. (2)283-288 Index of Recipes. 2fep. [1] Illustrated cartographic end-paper and paste-down. Cream coloured cloth boards. Spine with gilt and green cloth label. Unclipped D/J and lightly browned spine and lightly stained, browned and chipped at edges. With publisher's slip and review notes on reverse by cookery book writer Robin McDouall. Illustrated throughout by Francis Rose. Internally very good.
- Alice Babette Toklas was born in San Francisco, California into a middle-class Jewish family and attended schools in both San Francisco and Seattle. For a short time she also studied music at the University of Washington. She went to Paris and met Gertrude Stein an American writer, on September 8, 1907 on the first day that she arrived. Together they hosted a famous salon at 27 rue de Fleurus that attracted expatriate American writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, Paul Bowles, Thornton Wilder and Sherwood Anderson, and avant-garde painters, including Picasso, Matisse and Braque. Acting as Stein's confidante, lover, cook, secretary, muse, editor, critic, and general organizer, Toklas remained a background figure, chiefly living in the shadow of Stein, until Stein published her memoirs in 1933 under the teasing title The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. It became Stein's bestselling book. The two were a couple until Gertrude Stein's death in 1946. Toklas then published her own literary memoir, this 1954 book that mixed reminiscences and recipes. The most famous recipe therein (actually contributed by her friend Brion Gysin) is called "Haschich Fudge", a mixture of fruit, nuts, spices, and ‘canibus [sic] sativa’, or marijuana. Her name was later lent to the range of cannabis concoctions called Alice B. Toklas brownies. Some believe that the slang term toke, meaning to inhale marijuana, is derived from her last name. The cookbook has not been out of print since it was first published, and has been translated into numerous languages, most recently into Norwegian in 2007. A second cookbook followed in 1958 called Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present. She also wrote articles for several magazines and newspapers including The New Republic and the New York Times. In 1963 she published her autobiography, What Is Remembered, which abruptly ends with Stein's death, leaving little doubt that Stein was the love of her lifetime. Her later years were very difficult because of poor health and financial problems, aggravated by the fact that Stein's heirs took the priceless paintings (some of them Picassos), which had been left to her by Stein. Toklas also became a Roman Catholic convert in her old age, as she had been told by a priest that in that way she may possibly meet Stein again in the afterlife. She died in poverty at the age of 89, and is buried next to Stein in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France; Toklas' name is engraved on the back of Stein's headstone.

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ref number: 11098

WEBER   J.M. ERICH    
PRAKTISCHE KONDITOREI-KUNST
"PRA-KO-KU" Das grobe Konditorei-Fachbuch der Welt Herausgeber: J.M. Erich Weber, Dresden Mit Rezeptbuch "Ausgesuchte Spezial-Rezepte" und einem Satz von 23 Pausen und 6 Zelluloid-Schablonen Siebente Auflage Der Text dieser Ausgabe in deutscher, englischer, schwedischer, franzosischer und spanischer Sprache (printer's device of illustration of Weber) Internationaler Fachverlag J.M. Erich Weber, Radebeul-Dresden. Printed in Germany
Large 4to. 1923. 7th Edition. Pastedown and endpaper with special printer's design. [1] Half title. Book title in German, English, Swedish, French and Spanish. B/W Photograph of Erich Weber. [1] Title Page. 2p Preface in five languages. 2p Index. 1-108. Recipes in 5 languages on verso with a photograph on the facing page. 2p Advertisements. [1] End-paper and paste-down with special printer's design. With 90 coloured & 186 b/w plates. Also with 23 stencils of cakes & 6 celluloid schablones. Plus a 4to soft paper Recipe book with 37 pages. D/W in good condition with some pieces missing with no loss. Very fresh red cloth boards and spine with gilt writing and device on the boards.
- At the end of the 20th century, Germany started to rise to prominence in the confectionary crafts. Urbain Dubois (a Frenchman) had recently been appointed the Royal Confectioner to the court of Kaiser Willhelm 1. By the 1890’s Germany was wrestling with France to become the arbiter of confectionary design. Johannes Martin Erich Weber’s books started to make an impact. Weber was a Dresden supplier and confectionary school owner, who brought to his manual new recent technical advances in photography and printing. He also had an imaginative approach to marketing. Praktische Konditorei-Kunst was a popular guide for pastry students and chefs who baked goods for the Konditorei, those tearooms and cafés specializing in the pastry arts. Part of the importance of this book lies in its set of cake decoration templates and perforated parchment guides. The original supplements rarely withstood decades of use in professional kitchens. This copy has all of them present. The book and the two supplements are housed in their original thick brown cardboard sleeve, albeit - quite rubbed. The original dust-jacket is present (see 1st photograph below) and the book is in excellent condition overall. A wonderful item that is the legacy of a proud craftsman. It is a testament to the highest standards of bakery, patisserie and cake decoration, etc, of that time.

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Modern category
ref number: 11104

WILLIAMS, MBE.   JOHN     A beautifully designed book.
The Ritz London - The Cookbook
The Ritz Emblem - John Williams, MBE with James Steen Photographed by John Carey - Mitchell Beazely
FIRST EDITION. 2018. Large 4to. 350 x 223 x 25mm. 1fep. 1 page half-title, signed to "Bobby Hendry I hope you enjoy the book. The Evolution of Escoffier's Cuisine. Happy Cooking John Williams". Verso with legal production details. Title page. 2 pages Contents. 6-9 Introduction from John Williams with a beautiful image of a painting of John Williams. (see below) 10-11 Through the revolving door. 1 page photograph of a dish of Quails Eggs. 13-227. 228-231 Basic Recipes and Cooking Notes. 232-223 Pictures of the kitchen and dining room brigades. 234-235 A beautiful 2 page of the dining room and kitchen brigades. 236-238 Index. 239 Glossary of Terms. 240 Compliments of the Chef & About John Williams. 1fep. A sumptuous dark navy cover with embossed silver text. The front cover has the embossed Ritz Emblem. The text block as new. The edges silver. With a thin dark blue cloth bookmark. The whole in excellent condition.
- This is one of the most handsome cookery books I've seen. It is also very unique, as its a book about and representing a very famous hotel written entirely from the Chef's perspective. Encompassing the recipes, the Hotel, the guests, dining areas. the teams and the history conveyed by John William's, whose passion oozes from the pages. One thing not generally understood by people outside the catering trade, but understood well by chefs is the difference between great hotels and great restaurants. In the restaurant the customer comes to wine and dine well, then departs before the restaurant closes. The hotel has the guests staying in-house, with all meals, room service, housekeeping, catering outlets etc that are all required every day. This creates a very different emphasis especially for the upper management. Whereas in a restaurant the focus is on wine, food and ambience. The Ritz hotel requires a 24/7 operation every day of the year. With 111 rooms and 25 suites, banqueting rooms, the Palm Court and it's famous afternoon teas, the spectrum of such varied and differing venue needs, requires a much wider approach. Chef John Williams has also helped create a fine restaurant at the Ritz, gaining its first Michelin star in 2016. At the same time, his overview of the culinary needs of the whole hotel is just as paramount, with a standard that must not drop. His whole catering background is entirely that of great Hotels, his experience very broad and his knowledge very detailed. As a cook he has found his spiritual home in the Ritz. He is a great student and admirer of Auguste Escoffier and what Escoffier's impact has been on all cooks since then. In his own words; "We would not be where we are now as chefs, had it not been for Escoffier". The Hotel was opened in 1906 by Cesar Ritz the great friend and compatriot of Escoffier who was at that time Chef de Cuisine one mile away at the Carlton Hotel Pall Mall. Escoffier and Ritz collaborated in the opening of both Ritz hotels in Paris as well as London. John Williams is very aware that he carries the legacy of those two great hoteliers, and is more than willing to rise to the challenge. Possibly helping to surpass it. One thing in the book that makes me believe this, is Williams's own story on the last page about Mr Shannon at Claridge's Hotel. This story is in the full spirit of Ritz and Escoffier, both of whom had the full welfare and well-being of their guests as their highest priority. The book also impresses with the beautiful colour plates and recipes. I have picked one to show below in photographs 4 and 5 that possibly conveys everything about the Ritz and its history. Canard à la presse is a traditional French dish considered the height of culinary elegance. Originally a specialty of Rouen. The Rouen or Rhone ducks are large and have great flavour. It has also gained fame as a specialty of La Tour d'Argent restaurant in Paris. It consists of various parts of a roasted duck served in a sauce of its blood and bone marrow, which is extracted by way of the press seen in the photograph. The book shows all the other great dishes that The Ritz Hotel London is rightly famous for. Chef John Williams's mastery shines from every page, and is a professional testament to a life of cooking, learning, passion and achievement.

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Modern category
ref number: 11256

Woodbridge.   George    
The Reform Club
1836-1978 A history from the Club's records by GEORGE WOODBRIDGE With a foreward by MAURICE ASHLEY, C.B.E. Privately printed for Members of the Reform Club in association with Clearwater Publishing Company, Inc., New York and Toronto 1978.
FIRST EDITION. 1978. 250x180mm. 1fep. Half title. Verso with frontispiece - lithograph of London Clubs incl. The Reform. Title page. Verso with ISBN. 2p Forward. 2p Preface and Acknowledgements. 2p Contents and Illustrations. 1-173. [1] 175-178 Bibliography. 179-185 Index. [1] 1fep. With numerous photographs and illustrations in-text, some full page. Fully bound navy blue cloth and gilt writing and tooling on the spine and front cover. With a wine red d/j. All in excellent condition; as new.
- The Reform Club is a gentlemen's club on the south side of Pall Mall (at number 104), in central London. Originally for men only, it has admitted women since 1981. In 1977 its subscription fees were among the highest in London. It was founded in 1836 by Edward Ellice, Whig whip, whose riches came from the bank 'The Hudson's Bay Company', but whose zeal was chiefly devoted to securing the passage of the Reform Act of 1832. The new club, for members of both Houses of Parliament, was meant to be a centre for the radical ideas which that bill represented; a bastion of liberal and progressive thought that became closely associated with the Liberal Party, which had largely succeeded the Whigs by the middle of the 19th century. Until the decline of the Liberal Party, it was de rigueur for Liberal MPs to be members of the Reform Club, which almost constituted another party headquarters, although the National Liberal Club, formed under William Gladstone's chairmanship, was established in 1882, designed to be more "inclusive", and was geared more towards Liberal grandees and activists in the country. The building, like its neighbor the Travellers Club, (number 106), was designed by Sir Charles Barry and opened in 1841. The new club was palatial, the design being based on the Farnese Palace in Rome. The Reform was one of the first clubs to have bedrooms, and its library contains some 75,000 books, mostly political history and biography. The Library was established in 1841, shortly after the Club moved into the newly built clubhouse. A comprehensive collection of parliamentary papers, reports, speeches and reference works was regarded as essential for the many active politicians amongst the early members. But the Library also aimed to achieve a broad coverage in the humanities, in order to serve the Club's more general cultural aims. The Library was formed under the guidance of Sir Anthony Panizzi, a Club member and also the most distinguished librarian of the age; from 1856 to 1866 Panizzi held the post of Principal Librarian to the British Museum, where he is particularly remembered as the designer of the famous circular Reading Room. Another famous aspect of the Club is its association with Alexis Soyer. The flamboyant chef, self-promoter and writer of several important cookery books, became Chef de Cuisine in 1837. He designed the kitchens with Charles Barry at the newly built Club. He instituted many innovations, including cooking with gas, refrigerators cooled by cold water, and ovens with adjustable temperatures. His kitchens were so famous that they were opened for conducted tours. When Queen Victoria was crowned on 28 June 1838, he prepared a breakfast for 2,000 people in the Club. His salary was more than £1,000 a year. His eponymous Lamb Cutlets Reform are still on the menu of this grand institution. During the Great Irish Famine in April 1847, he invented the 'magic stove' and designed a soup kitchen. The Government asked him to go to Ireland to implement his idea. He got indefinite leave from the Club and opened his soup kitchen in Dublin and his 'famine soup' was served to thousands of the poor for free. Soyer resigned from the Reform Club in May 1850. He was succeeded by another famous Victorian cookery-book writer; Charles Elme Francatelli, who went on to serve the club with distinction for seven years. This volume is an interesting history of an important London institution and bastion of the more liberal elements of the British establishment.

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Modern category
ref number: 11110