Liebig Company's.       - A nice copy of a beautifully designed booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. The guttering has a little rust form the staples not affecting the look or text. Overall a very nice complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is not usually found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron was known as a very active organic chemist and was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no weight of skin, bones nor meat) The idea appealed to the Baron and promised to be very lucrative, so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, (see image #2 below) where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of 3000. The meat extract was a molasses-like black spread packaged in an opaque white glass bottle, and contained only reduced meat stock and salt (4%). It took 3 kg of meat to make 100 g of extract. By 1875, 500 tonnes of the extract were being produced at the Fray Bentos plant each year. The manufacture of the meat extract was done under the strict control of a company chemist. It was then shipped to Antwerp. On arrival in Europe it was again inspected and samples of each consignment were tested for composition and flavour. In the booklet the public are cautioned against various imitations. In 1873, Liebig's began producing tinned corned beef, sold under the label Fray Bentos. Later, freezer units were installed, enabling the company to also export frozen and chilled raw meat. A cheaper version of Liebig extract was introduced under the name Oxo in 1899. Later, the Oxo bouillon cube was introduced. In the 1920s, the company acquired the Oxo Tower Wharf on the south bank of the river Thames in London. There they erected a factory, demolishing most of the original building, preserving and building upon the riverside frontage. The Liebig Extract of Meat Company was acquired by the Vestey Group in 1924 and the factory was renamed El Anglo. Liebig merged with Brooke Bond in 1968, which was in turn acquired by Unilever in 1984. Liebig produced many illustrated advertising products: table cards, menu-cards, children games, free trade card sets, calendars, posters, poster-stamps, paper and other ephemera. These were often in the form of trading card sets with stories, historical tidbits, geographic tidbits, and so on. The sets usually consisted of six cards, one card included per product sale. Many famous artists were contracted to design those series of cards, which were first produced using true lithography, then litho chromo, chromolithography and finally offset printing. The cards remain popular with collectors and are often collected in albums. Copies of Liebig's recipe booklet are also much sought after. Due to the fact that they did not survive well in the oily and robust kitchen environment, lovely clean copies such as this one are quite rare.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11147

Liebig Company's.       - A beautiful copy of a scarce booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. Spine is relaid crimson cloth. Inside very clean with slight foxing on the title page. The guttering has been strenghtened with a light foxing not affecting the text. Overall a very good complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is rarely found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later, Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron, known as a very active organic chemist was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no debris of skin, bones nor meat) The promising lucrative plan appealed to the Baron so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of around 3000.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11063

M.H. & Mary Tillinghast.       - Two books bound in one
THE YOUNG COOKS Monitor;
OR DIRECTIONS FOR Cookery and Distilling, BEING A Choice Compendium of Excellent Receipts. Made Publick for the Use and Benifit of my Scholars. The THIRD EDITION with Large ADDITIONS. By M.H. LONDON: Printed for the Author, at her House in Limestreet. 1705. --- BOUND WITH: Rare and Excellent RECEIPTS. Experienc'd, and Taught By Mrs Mary Tillinghast. And now Printed for the Use of her Scholars only. LONDON, Printed in the Year, 1690.
12mo. 2fep. Title page. 2pp. Epistle preface, signed M.H. (9-180) 2nd Title page. (1-30) 2fep. Nicely bound in contemporary full mottled tan calf with gilt lines and fillet on boards. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines, red label with gilt lettering. Clean internally with very light ageing and minor worming to some pages without loss of text. A very rare item.
- The first edition was printed 1683. Oxford states that the 2nd edition of 1690 has an appendix. This third edition of 1705 also has an appendix. The second book; Tillinghast's 'Rare and Excellent Receipts' was first printed in 1678. This copy is the second of 1690. In Oxford's 'Notes from a Collector's Catalogue' he writes on pp87, that both his and the BM's copies of Tillinghast's book are also bound with the 'Young Cook's Monitor' There is also a surprising similarity between these 2 books bound in one volume, and the anonymous work, 'The True Way'. The three books and receipts are remarkably similar with the three Title pages all proclaiming they are; Made Publick for the Use and Benefit of my Scholars' The Epistle Directories of both books have the same similar statement addressed to her Scholars. (There is no Epistle Directory in Tillinghast's book). The 'True Way' does not have any indication of authorship, while the 'Cook's Monitor' has M.H. after the preface. This compiler suggests that Mary Tillinghast is the maiden name of the M.H. of the 'Young Cooks Monitor'. I suggest that sometime after writing/publishing her 'Excellent Receipts' in 1678, Mary Tillinghast married and assumed her married initials of M.H. while keeping the authorship of 'The True Way' anonymous. At this point in time there is no way to prove this theory, but the startling similarities between the three works (bound in two volumes) are too evident to ignore.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10960

MACKENZIE   COLIN     - Very scarce.
Five Thousand Receipts.
IN ALL THE USEFUL AND DOMESTIC ARTS, CONSTITUTING A COMPLETE AND UNIVERSAL Practical Library, AND OPERATIVE CYCLOPAEDIA. - Mr Hobbes, of Malmesbury, thought the accumulation of details a hindrance of learning; and used to wish all the Books in the world were embarked in one ship, and he might be permitted to bore a hole in its bottom. He was right in one sense; for the Disquisitions and Treatises with which our Libraries are filled, are ofter merely the husks and shells of knowledge; but it would be to be wished, that before he were permitted to bore his hole, some literary analysts should select all the facts, Recipes, and Prescriptions, useful to Man, and condense them into a portable Volume. LOCKE. By COLIN MACKENZIE, AUTHOR OF ONE THOUSAND EXPERIMENTS IN MANUFACTURES AND CHEMISTRY. A NEW EDITION. LONDON: SHERWOOD, GILBERT, AND PIPER, PATERNOSTER-ROW; AND TO BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS IN TOWN AND COUNTRY. 1834. Price 10s 6d. Bound.
Thick 143 x 150mm. 1 fep. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)6 – 798. (1)800 – 827 Index. 1p Advertisements. (1) [1] (1)4 – 22 [2] Catalogue of Modern Books. 1fep. Original full brown calf boards with gilt writing on the front. A little rubbed. Re-backed spine in modern mid-tan calf with raised bands, gilt lines and blind tooling. Black label with gilt writing. Internally quite clean. A nice copy of a very scarce book.
- Nothing is recorded nor known about MacKenzie. Oxford appears to have a first edition of 1823 and cites a third of 1824. He also states that there was reprints in America as late as 1870. Bitting has a fourth American edition of 1829 and cites a Philadelphia edition of 1866.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11118

MACKENZIE   COLIN    
Five Thousand Receipts.
IN ALL THE USEFUL AND DOMESTIC ARTS, CONSTITUTING A COMPLETE AND UNIVERSAL Practical Library, AND OPERATIVE CYCLOPAEDIA. - Mr Hobbes, of Malmesbury, thought the accumulation of details a hindrance of learning; and used to wish all the Books in the world were embarked in one ship, and he might be permitted to bore a hole in its bottom. He was right in one sense; for the Disquisitions and Treatises with which our Libraries are filled, are ofter merely the husks and shells of knowledge; but it would be to be wished, that before he were permitted to bore his hole, some literary analysts should select all the facts, Recipes, and Prescriptions, useful to Man, and condense them into a portable Volume. LOCKE. By COLIN MACKENZIE, AUTHOR OF ONE THOUSAND EXPERIMENTS IN MANUFACTURES AND CHEMISTRY. FIFTH EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED FOR G.B.WHITTAKER, AVE MARIA LANE, AND TO BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 1825. Price 10s 6d. Bound, or 12s, Calf-gilt.
Thick 140 x 147mm. 3 feps with ink stamp ‘Capt. G.D. INGLIS. R.M. A.D. 1908. Title page with Capt. Inglis’s stamp. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)6 – 798. (1)800 – 827 Index. [1] Advertisement. 3 fep with Capt. Inglis’s stamp. Original full brown calf with gilt writing on the front boards. A little rubbed. The spine is a modern quarter red cloth with gilt writing. Internally very clean. A very nice copy.
- This is a Victorian style all purpose household and hobbies book that has a gilt heading on the front cover stating "Family Library". The chapters start with Metallurgy and include Varnishes, Polishing, Artists Colours, Crayons, Miniature Paintings, Enamelling, Engraving, Dyeing, Bleaching, Brewing, Wines, Distilling, Cookery, Pastry, Perfumery, Medicine, Farriery, Tanning, Horticulture, Husbandry, Domestic Economy, Pottery, Glass etc etc. A comprehensive and true glimpse of the crafts of the time.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11117

Malouin.   Par M.     - Complete with a full set of plates.
Description et Details des Arts
DU MEUNIER, DU VERMICELIER ET DU BOULENGER; Avec une Histoire abrégée de la Boulengerie, & un Dictonnaire de ces Arts. Par M. MALOUIN. M.DCC.LXVII.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1767. Large folio. 430x295mm 1fep. Title page. [1] 2pp Table des Titres et Chapitres. (1)2-340. 10pp of Engraved plates; 2pp of the Meunier (Miller) ; 2pp of the Vermicelier (Pasta maker) ; 6pp of the Boulenger (Baker). 1fep. All pages very clean. Contemporary dark brown calf spine with blue marbled boards and calf tips. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and red gilt label. Externally very slightly rubbed but overall in excellent condition.
- The outstanding full page engraved plates chronicle the methods, equipment and final product of the Miller, Pasta maker and Baker. The book is full of precise instructions pertaining to the three trades, particularly the Baker. It details everything from the quality and storage of the wheat berries to the methods of stone grinding, to the oven construction and equipment used for processing and baking. In an article online called 'The Pristine Loaf' by Hildegard Pickles, there is a chapter detailing the changeover to Yeast. Sour-dough had remained for centuries the only leavening agent for bread making. This was also the case in France, where it represented the sole raising agent, except for cake making purposes for which brewer's yeast was used until pressed yeast replaced it. In the 17th century a fundamental change took place that is chronicled by Malouin in this book. When the changeover to yeast occurred, there was a protest, as the Medical Faculty in Paris did not approve. A resolution taken by them on 24 March 1668 resulted in no majority gained for the use of yeast alone, and only after a further resolution was made by the French parliament on 21 March 1670 were bakers allowed to use yeast. The resolution also demanded that it must be fresh and obtained from a Parisian brewery, and that it should also be mixed with sour-dough. (A typical political decsion trying to appease 3 trades at once and ending up with a mish-mash of a raising agent). The yeast in those days was obviously different and the process was changing and evolving over time. Bakers could no longer rely on the same product and had to evolve as well. One wonders how consistent the loaves were. It must have been a frustrating time for the them individually and as a trade. The beautiful and impressive plates are sometimes found at auction and fetch on their own, silly money. In the complete state with a full compliment of plates, a very rare, fascinating and handsome book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11087

Manuscript Receipts   - De Capell Brooke Family     - a distinguished provenance.
Great Oakley Hall, Northamptonshire.
One 19th Century vellum bound volume.
204x165mm. Marbled paste-downs and end-papers. Loose first page which is a two column index of 73 recipes. First sixty pages are written recipes in black and brown ink in predominately two neat hands in an early Victorian script. 24 pages of tipped-in assorted recipes. 68 blank pages. At the back 22 pages of medicinal recipes. Two recipes are dated, #73, Stewed Rabbit - 1855 Jan. 22nd Oakley. and the last written recipe for Semolina Ghnocchi inscribed Mrs Symond. June 1894, - Internally quite clean, Fully bound in age dusted vellum with a 1 inch brown stain on the front cover. The hinge and guttering are cracked but holding well. Altogether a very interesting document with fine provenance.
- This manuscript recipe book belonged to Catherine De Capell Brooke of Great Oakley Hall, Great Oakley, Northamptonshire. The Hall has been the De Capell Brooke's ancestral home for over five centuries. The Brookes' are perhaps the most ancient family in Northamptonshire still living in their ancestral home. In 1472 William Brooke purchased a manor in the small village of Great Oakley . It is situated approx. 2 miles from Corby and 5 miles from Kettering. Much of Great Oakley has been in ownership of the Brooke Family since then. The present lord of the manor is Hugh de Capell Brooke, who lives with his family in Great Oakley Hall, which was extensively renovated in the 1960s. Although in recent years extensive new housing estates have been built at the top end of the village, a preservation order exists on all trees and stone houses in the village ensuring that some of the character of Great Oakley remains for future generations. Thomas Brooke is believed to have began building Great Oakley Hall in 1555. After the death in 1762 of Wheeler Brooke the estates descended to Mary Supple whose husband took the name of Brooke. Their son, Richard De Capell Brooke, Bart: was made a Baronet in June 20th 1803. His first son, Sir Arthur, the 2nd Baronet was a famous traveller and author. (died 1858). The second son, Sir William De Capell Brooke, Bart: (born 1801) succeeded to his brother's title and estate in 1858. A Barrister at Law, he died in 1897. In 23.4.1829 Sir William married Catherine [nee Watson] De Capell Brooke (born 1802), daughter of Lewis Thomas Watson, the 2nd Lord Sones. It appears Catherine started this cookery manuscript after she got married, and it further appears it was passed on within the family after her death on 24.11.1888. With the last date of 1894 recorded, we may assume it was written and in use from, circa 1829 - 1894. Considering these kind of items are handled fairly often, and used in a relatively hazardous and oily environment it has survived well. It is altogether a handsome and well maintained household book with interesting recipes and advice. Many come up for sale but without clear provenance. The dealer from whom I purchased this item also owned other documents and ephemera from Great Oakley. He also did most of the research on Catherine De Capell Brooke.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11158

Manuscript Receipts   - the Winstanley family.     - with an excellent provenenance.
Old Braunston Hall, Leicestershire.
Three vellum bound volumes dated from the 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries.
Volume 1. 182x120mm. dated 1659. Volume 2. 207x107mm. dated 1772. Volume 3. 195x158mm. dated 1844. ---- VOL.1: - On paste- down, the name of C[lemont] Winstanley, April 1659. Written in two hands in black and brown ink, in a slightly messy script. The first 39 pages are mixed receipts in medicinal, cookery, wine and veterinary. The next 25 pages are blank. The last 12 pages at the back are written upside down to the front. They consist of very interesting lists recording the distribution of fish from one pond to another. there are four dates: 1790, 1799, 1805, 1806. Some pages have been cut and removed from the front and back of the book. VOL. 2: - The front paste-down states this book belongs to T.Parkyns her book, October 3rd, 1772. At the back there is also an inventory of Mrs Winstanely's linen dated, July 21st, 1788. The first 104 pages are daily shopping lists in a fairly messy script. The next are 4 blanks then 10 pages of cookery receipts. VOL. 3: - The front paste-down has in bold ink - Mrs Pochin's Receipt Book. It also states intriguingly in ink, another name and date - Mrs Binley, 1651. Before marriage to Ralph George Pochin (also known as ‘George’) of Barkby Hall, Leicestershire. Mrs Pochin had been Anna Jane Winstanley. The book probably belonged to, and was inherited from either her mother or mother-in-law, as the recipe on page 82 is dated 1844, 18 years before she was born. The other date of 1651 probably came from a very early branch of the Pochin or Winstanely families called Binley. (further research has not solved the puzzle). The first 82 pages are filled with recipes in a neat longhand script. Most of them have names attached with many attributed to Mrs Smith and a few to Mrs G. Pochin (Anna Jane Winstanley). The rest of the pages, a little over half are blank. There are two dates of 1807 within the text and a last date of 1844 in the last written recipe. There is also another undated, loose 32 page manuscript, in a very neat but earlier script in faded brown ink. The pages are also slightly bigger (approx 10mm all round) and more age browned than the book indicating it came from another much earlier family cookery manuscript, very possibly pre-dating the first volume. One of the recipes is attributed to Mrs Winstanley and another to Mrs M. Pochin. Given the variance between the two dates of 1651-1844, indicating these recipe books were in use for a minimum of 193 years, with the dis-bound manuscript pages indicating even earlier.
- All three volumes were the property of the Winstanely Family of Old Hall, Braunstone, and the Pochin Family of Barkby Hall, both in Leicestershire. Book 1. was the property of Clemont Winstanely. Baptised, January 15th. 1644-1672. Book 2. belonged to Jane Parkyns who was married to a later Clement Winstanley, born 1739, died 1808. Jane herself died one year before in 1807. Book 3. belonged to Anna Jane Pochin (nee Winstanley) born 1862, died 1910. Her brother James died unmarried so for the first time the succession went to his sister. She had married Ralph George Pochin of Barkby Hall, Sheriff of Leicestershire who had also been a Commander RN. The Winstanleys’ came to Braunstone in the mid 17th century. James Winstanley (the father of Clement) purchased the estate from the executors of the Hastings family after the death of Henry Hastings’ in 1649, for the sum of £6,000. A quitclaim in 1651 gave him freehold interest in the estate of Braunstone. The Winstanley’s played a vital role in determining the future economic and social history of their properties in and around Braunstone and Kirby Muxloe for the next 275 years. They had a reputation for being fair-minded and judicious, holding important roles as leading dignitaries in The Leicester Corporation. Their decisions influenced the lives of the communities of both Braunstone and Leicester. James Winstanely, Clemont's father was a puritan and a lawyer by profession in the service of the Duchy of Lancaster before taking up residence in Braunstone. He and his wife Catherine had three children. James was a member of Grey’s Inn and the Recorder of Leicester, a position he held until his failure to conform in 1662. While in office he Proclaimed Oliver Cromwell as Lord Protector. He died in 1666 and the estate passed to his eldest son Clement. Clement like his father was a member of Grays Inn and his wife was also called Catherine. Clement died in 1672 and was buried in the family vault under the alter of the 12th century church of St. Peter’s in Braunstone village. Their eldest son James became the third Winstanley to inherit the estate. He was also a member of Grays Inn and M.P. for Leicester. James married Frances, daughter of James Holt of Castleton and their only son, also named James, took over on the death of his father in 1719. He was elected to the post of High Sheriff of Leicester and married his cousin Mary Prideaux. In 1750 he bored for coal near the lakes on Braunstone Park, hoping to cash in on the lucrative trade. But one night after two weeks of hard work by his estate hands, saboteurs, thought to be from the Leicestershire Colliers, filled the bore hole with rocks and stones. With his attempt to find coal thwarted he never continued with the venture. He died in 1770. James was succeeded by his son, another Clement. In 1775 he commissioned the local architect and builder William Oldham (who later became the Lord Mayor of Leicester) to construct the present Braunston Hall . The design typical of the period, a solid Georgian residence. (See image 1. below) The Hall was built on a rise with views overlooking Charnwood forest and set in one hundred acres of fine parkland. Clement also held the Office of High Sheriff of Leicester and in 1774 a remarkable procession took place. It was the custom to accompany the Judge to the Assizes Court at the Leicester Castle. The procession left from Braunstone Hall in military fashion. Thirty gentlemen wearing blue coats with crimson collars, white waistcoats and breeches formed the main escort, with a further 400 horsemen in attendance. The spectacle drew large crowds of bystanders who cheered them on their way. His wife was Jane Parkyns (the owner of the second volume) sister of the First Baron Rancliffe of Bunny, Nottinghamshire. He died in 1808. Jane had died one year before. The next to become heir was their eldest son Clement, J.P. Lieutenant – Colonel of the Leicestershire Militia from 1802-9. He was also the Chairman of the Leicester and Swanington Railway, which opened in 1832. He died unmarried in 1855. The estate passed to his nephew James Beaumont, High Sheriff of Leicester. He was only thirty when he mysteriously disappeared while abroad in Europe. When a body was found floating in the river Moselle in Germany the Winstanley family hired the private detective “Tanky Smith” to go to Germany to identify the body. A butler from the hall accompanied him and on the evidence of some clothing and a pair of cufflinks the body was identified as James Beaumont. The year was 1862. James was unmarried so for the first time the succession went to a female member of the family, his sister, Anna Jane Pochin - nee' Winstanley (owner of the third volume). Anna Jane was married to Ralph George Pochin of Barkby Hall in Leicestershire. The Pochin family were also long established in Leicestershire, having lived in Barkby Hall since 1604. The Pochin Family Tree extends from the early 13th. Century and claims to cover 23 generations. There are still large gaps, with many Leicestershire Pochins missing. In 1904 Anna Jane relinquished the estate in favour of her son Richard Norman Pochin and moved with Ralph to Braunston Hall. Interestingly, Richard Norman Pochin, changed his name by deed poll to Winstanley. In 1911 he extended the south side of Barkby Hall by adding a wing with toilets and bathrooms. It was in 1925 while he, his wife and six children were still in residence that the Leicester Corporation compulsory purchased his land in Braunston for much needed housing. One of their children, Rosemary Philippa Winstanely born in 1914 at Braunstan Hall married Robert Poore. Their son Andrew Phillip Poore, born 1951 and the great (x 7) grandchild of the Clement Winstanley mentioned at the beginning, is the one who gave me these manuscripts. His mother passed away on the 6th Oct. 2006 at Brown Edge, West Malvern, Worcestershire. As an interesting footnote, Andrew Poore's family have a long and well documented history in the West Country. Richard Poore on the death of his brother Herbert Poore, succeeded him to the position of Bishop of Salisbury by 27 June, 1217. During his tenure he helped plan and oversee the construction of the new Salisbury Cathedral as a replacement for the old cathedral at Old Sarum. He also laid out the town of Salisbury in 1219, to allow the workers building the cathedral a less cramped town than the old garrison town of Old Sarum. Richard died on 15 April 1237. He is commemorated with a statue in niche 170 on the west front of the Cathedral he built. NB: I gratefully received an interesting e-mail from Edward Geoff Pochin on May 2011, who corrected me on some erroneous facts I had entered about the Pochin Family tree. Another Pochin - Marian Peacock, also mailed me and told me the sad story of Ralph George Pochin's aunt, an Ann (not Anna) Jane Winstanley who tragically burned to death in her London house in 1847.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11157

Markham.   Gervase    
The English Hous-Wife
CONTAINING The inward and outward Vertues which ought to be in a compleat Woman: As her skill in Physick, Surgery, Cookery, Extraction of Oyles, Banqueting stussc, Ordering of great Feasts, Preserving of all forts of Wines, conceited Secrets, Distillations, Perfumes, ordering of Wool, Hemp, Flax: making Cloth and Dying, the knowledge of Dayries: Office of Malting: of Oates, their excellent uses in a family: of Brewing, Baking, and all other things belonging to an houshold. A Work generally approved, and now the sixth time much augmented, purged, and made most profitable and necessary for all men, and the general good of this NATION. By G.M. LONDON, Printed by W.Wilson, for E.Brewster, and George Sawbridge, at the Bible on Ludgate-hill, neere Fleet bridge. 1656.
4to. 1fep. Title Page. [1] 2pp Epistle. 4pp The Table. 1-188. 1fep. On p119 illustrations of wine gages. Bound in dark brown modern half calf with marble boards and calf corners and gilt lines. Spine with raised bands, red label with gilt lettering and lines. Clean internally with very age browning. A handsome copy of a scarce book.
- Gervase Markham or 'Jervis', born 1568. English poet and miscellaneous writer, third son of Sir Robert Markham of Cotham, Nottinghamshire. He was a soldier of fortune in the Low Countries, and later was a captain under the Earl of Essex's command in Ireland . He was acquainted with Latin and several modern languages, and had an exhaustive practical acquaintance with the arts of forestry and agriculture . He was a noted horse-breeder, and is said to have imported the first Arab horse into England., otherwise very little is known of the events of his life . The story of the murderous quarrel between Gervase Markham and Sir John Holies related in the Biographia Britannica (s.v . Holies) has been generally connected with him, but in the Dictionary of National Biography, Sir Clements R . Markham, a descendant from the same family, refers it to another contemporary of the same name, whose monument is still to be seen in Laneham church . Gervase Markham was buried at St Giles's, Cripplegate, London, on the 3rd of February 1637 . He was a voluminous writer on many subjects, but he repeated himself considerably in his works, sometimes reprinting the same books under other titles . His booksellers procured a declaration from him in 1617 that he would produce no more on certain topics . Markham's writings include: The Teares of the Beloved (1600) and Marie Magdalene's Teares (1601) long and rather commonplace poems on the Passion and Resurrection of Christ. His best known book is 'A Way to get Wealth' which contains 'The English House-wife'. It is printed as '2 book' at the top of each page, indicating it is the second-book of Markam's 'Country Contentments' 1st edition - 1615. It was later published as 'A Way to get Wealth' with the 'English Hous-wife' being published as the third book.. It ran to many editions and Oxfords cites - 1623(2nd). (no 3rd). 1631(4th). 1637(5th). 1648. 1649. This copy of 1656(6th). 1660(7th). 1664. 1668(8th). 1675. 1683(9). An edition of 1653 was reprinted in 1907. Never the less, and despite so many editions, it is still a very scarce book and is usually found and sold on its own. It is as an important seventeenth century cookery book and a very interesting item that Oxford rates as having more modern recipes than those of preceding books, albeit with many obsolete dishes. He also rates the medical recipes and finds them disgusting and appalling, with the use of animal dung and other filthy ingredients being frequently used. Surprisingly the first recipe for Haggis is found in the 1615 edition (and subsequent editions) of Markham's 'English Hus-wife' in chapter 8 about the benefits of Oates. NB: I just received an interesting and welcome email from Regula Ysewijn, a food photographer, informing me that Haggis did not appear first in the English Hous-wife as I have mistakenly stated above, but in a cookery book called ‘Liber Cure Cocorum’, from the County of Lancashire in England. Written in verse and dating from around 1430. Called ‘Hagese’ in the book, the general recipe mirrors the one made in Scotland. As I was born in Scotland, it is a big surprise to find that it now appears our celebrated national pudding possibly originated in England. I am now going to see if I can take this very surprising news further. My research must now try to answer the following …. Did the Lancashire recipe originate in Lancashire or any other English location, or did it originate in Scotland and was brought to England. Lets see….

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10923

Marshall   Agnes Bertha     - with the four coloured plates.
THE BOOK OF ICES
INCLUDING CREAM AND WATER ICES, SORBETS, MOUSSES, ICED SOUFFLES, AND VARIOUS ICED DISHES, WITH NAMES IN FRENCH AND ENGLISH, AND VARIOUS COLOURED DESIGNS FOR ICES. BY A.B. MARSHALL. (Copyright.) REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION. London: MARSHALL’S SCHOOL OF COOKERY, 32, MORTIMER STREET. SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO., LIMITED, 4, STATIONERS’-HALL, COURT. [Price Half-a-Crown net.]
180 x 120mm. n/d. Front paste-down and end-paper with lovely advertisements. Half-title. On verso advertisement for all Marshall’s books. [1] Frontispiece – one of the four coloured plates. Title page with tissue guard. [1] (1)vi-vii Contents. [1] (1)2-52. (1)54-76 Advertisements featuring wonderful illustrated drawings of Marshall’s ice-moulds, ice-pots and machines. (1)78-79 Index. On verso advertisement for all Marshall’s dry goods. [1] End-paper and paste-down with lovely advertisements. Original bright blue cloth cover with blind tolled lines and bright gilt writing. Internally very clean with the four coloured plates with tissue guards. A lovely copy of this very scarce much sought after thin volume. Earlier copies were published without the plates and had limited advertisements.
- In Ivan Day's extremely interesting web-site "Historic Food" there is an article about the history of ice-moulds. It states "The tradition of making novelty ices in the form of vegetables, fruits and other food items seems to have started in late seventeenth Naples, where moulded sorbetti were known as pezzi duri (hard pieces). A pewter mould for making asparagus ices is illustrated in Gillier's 'Canammeliste Francaise' - Nancy: 1750. By the 1860s these moulds were to be found at ‘most ironmonger's', so bunches of ice cream or water ice asparagus (see image #6 below) seem to have become popular by this time with Victorian diners. They were frequently illustrated in nineteenth and early twentieth century cookery texts, such as this work by Marshall, also Theodore Garrett and John Kirkland. American mould manufacturers were still making asparagus moulds in the 1950s, though by this time, they had become much stouter in order to facilitate easy demoulding. The earlier, narrow moulds are not easy to use, as the asparagus ices are difficult to turn out without breaking. They should be dipped into cold water for about twelve seconds and the ices rolled out onto a clean table napkin with the finger tips, rather than the point of a knife, which is usual with most other ice-moulds".--- If you go hunting thro' the stalls on Portobello Road, London, on a Saturday morning you will still be able to find those Victorian pewter or copper ice-cream moulds. The good ones can now cost hundreds of pounds. They are much sought after by serious collectors.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11146