Copley.   Esther    
THE HOUSEKEEPER'S GUIDE
OR A PLAIN & PRACTICAL SYSTEM OF Domestic Cookery, BY ESTHER COPLEY. Author of Cottage Comforts &c. (A small illustration of kitchen equipment) London. PRINTED FOR JACKSON & WALFORD 18 St PAULS CHURCH YARD 1834.
FIRST EDITION. 180 x 113 mm. 1fep with ownership inscriptions. Frontispiece of a fine illustration of a kitchen scene. 1st ornate Title page. 2nd Title Page. (1)iv - xi Introduction. 5 plates of Carving and Butchery Illustrations, 1loose. (1)2 - 391. [1] (1)394 - 407 Index. [1] 1fep. 1/4 green publisher's original cloth with original grey paper hardboard covers. Text block slightly dusty but fine. Overall in good original condition. This is possibly Copley's scarcest title.
- Esther Copley (born Esther Beuzeville on 10 May 1786 in London, died on 17 July 1851 in Eythorne, Kent) was a prolific author of children's books, tracts, and books on domestic economy. Cottage Comforts (1825), addressed to the working people, went into scores of editions, for example. Among several other works on domestic matters was the pamphlet Hints on the Cholera morbus (1832), on how to prevent and treat the disease. Her stories for children were mainly didactic, designed to make them thrifty and good by providing examples of moral behaviour. She also wrote longer, non-fiction works for children, including Scripture Natural History for Youth (1828) and a 500-page History of Slavery and its Abolition (1836). [Ref: Rooke Books - Home of the mad librarian]

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11269

COPLEY.   ESTHER     This title printed anonymously.
THE NEW FEMALE INSTRUCTOR;
OR YOUNG WOMAN'S GUIDE TO DOMESTIC HAPPINESS; CONTAINING GENERAL RULES FOR THE REGULATION OF FEMALE CONDUCT; TOGETHER WITH THE ELEMENTS OF SCIENCE, AS GEOGRAPHY, ASTRONOMY, NATURAL HISTORY, BOTANY, &c IMPORTANT HINTS IN REGARD TO ECONOMY; ALSO, Examples of Illustrious Women: TO WHICH ARE ADDED, ADVICE TO SERVANTS; A COMPLETE ART OF COOKERY; WITH PLAIN DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING; AND A GREAT VARIETY OF MEDICINAL AND OTHER USEFUL RECEIPTS; BEING AN EPITOME OF ALL THE REQUIREMENTS NECESSARY TO FORM THE FEMALE CHARACTER, IN EVERY CLASS OF LIFE. (a small single line) Illustrated with appropriate Engravings. (a small single line) LONDON: THOMAS KELLY, 17, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCCXXXVII.
8vo. 217 x 147 mm. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece dated 1834. Title page. (1)iv-vi Preface. (1)viii Contents and Directions for plates. (1) 2-3 Introduction. 4-664. (1)666-670 Index. 1fep. Seven plates. Bound in full dark-brown calf with ornate faded gilt-spine re-laid. Text dusty and stained in places. Overall fine.
- Esther Hewlett Copley (1786 - 1851) was a Baptist prolific writer of fiction (children) and histories. Born in London to a French Huguenot silk manufacturer. She married James Hewlett, evangelical curate at St Aldates, Oxford, in 1809, and chaplain at Magdalen and New College. In 1827 she married William Copley a Baptist minister at New Road, Oxford, where she had already joined after the death of her first husband. In 1837 he became minister at Baptist Church, Eythorne, Kent, but her husband suffered signs of alcoholism, and he eventually left her in 1843. She remained at Eythorne until her death in 1851, but left the Baptist chapel in 1844, though she remained a Baptist. She wrote prolifically after 1815, mostly works for children, religious and moral tracts (uniting morality with domestic economy), and sacred history and biography, including The Cook's Complete Guide - 1827. (see item #11258 on this site). Cottage Comforts - 1825, (see item #10930 on this site). Cottage Cookery - 1849. (see item #11016. on this site). The Housekeeper's Guide - 1834. (see item #11269. on this site). The Young Servant’s Friendly Instructor - 1827. Catechism of Domestic Economy - 1850. Among her works for young people are The Old Man's Head, or, Youthful Recollections - 1823. My Mother's Stories, or, Traditions and Recollections - 1838. The Poplar Grove, or, Little Harry and his Uncle Benjamin - 1841. and Family Experiences and Home Secrets -n1851. Among her works written for children are Scripture Natural History for Youth - 1828. Scripture History for Youth - 1829. and Scripture Biography -m1835, and possibly her most significant work, A History of Slavery and its Abolition - 1836.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11303

Cox.   James     - An unusually long 19" plate.
The Practical Confectioner,
EMBRACING THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF Pastry, and Confectionery, IN ALL THEIR VARIOUS BRANCHES; Containing upwards of 200 Genuine and Valuable RECEIPTS; CONSISTING OF upwards of 60 Second-Course and Supper Dishes; INCLUDING Jellies, Creams, Soufflés Puddings, Chantillas, and Ornamental Pastry and Confectionary of every description: Preserving in all its Various branches; Cakes and Biscuits of various kinds; Ice Creams and Water Ices; Sugars, Candies, Syrups &cc.; Many of which have never appeared in Print: the whole written in the plainest manner, without the least ambiguity; WITH THE BILLS OF FARE FOR BALL SUPPERS, ON A LARGE AND SMALL SCALE. BY JAMES COX. London: Published by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Browne; and sold by all the booksellers in the United Kingdom. 1822. PRICE EIGHT SHILLINGS.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION: 12 mo. 2feps. Title page with printers - Newcombe of Broad-Street, Bristol on verso. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface. 4 Plates of Bills of Fare, 3 folding with the largest measuring an unusual 19 inches long. (1)8-220. (1)222-234 Index. 2feps. Full calf with slightly faded boards and relaid calf spine with blind tooling, gilt lines and lettering. Cookery books are famed for the attrition they suffer in the greasy hands of those that use them. Although this one lacks the aforementioned grease, internally it is slightly yellowed with age, but overall its a fine copy of an extremely scarce book.
- One of the landmark books in the field of confectionery, pastry and sweets. A sole edition, the date on the preface states Clifton (Bristol) August 1822, and also advertised for 8 shillings in The London Literary Gazette on Saturday, September 14th 1822. One sees the antiquated style of the title echoed in other books throughout the 19th century. Never the less, Cox’s well illustrated and informed work and although probably one of the the lesser known, is certainly on a par with the other great Confectioners; Nutt, Jarrin, Borella, Dubois et al. Copies in any condition are extremely scarce, even possibly rare. A key work in any collection of antiquarian cookery books. COPAC reveals five copies: St Andrews , Aberdeen, Cambridge, the Wellcome library and the BL also has one copy.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11153

Dalgairns   Mrs     - The 2nd Edition.
The Practice of Cookery.
ADAPTED BY THE BUSINESS OF EVERY DAY LIFE. BY MRS DALGAIRNS. SECOND EDITION. EDINBURGH: PRINTED FOR CADELL AND COMPANY EDINBURGH: SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, LONDON: AND ALL BOOKSELLERS. [A small single line] 1829. [an messy ink stain in the top right corner, not affecting text].
174 x 105 mm. fep. Title page. [1]. Preface (1)vi-viii. Preface to the second edition. [1]. Index (1)xii-xxix. [1] Half Title page. [1]. (1)2-524. Appendix (1)526-528. 1fep. 1455 recipes in total. Full dark tan contemporary binding. Original re-backed spine with black label and gilt lettering. Some ink writing on the title page and with a small hole not affecting the text. Overall a nice copy.
- Online there is a surprising amount of detailed information about Mrs Dalgairns and her book: "The Practice of Cookery Adapted to the Business of Every-day Life.". Most of the information can be found at three places: #1 - http://www.cooksinfo.com --- #2 - http://www.electricscotland.com -- #3 – The Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada, Vol 45, No 1 (2007) 'A Fortuitous Nineteenth-Century Success Story' by Mary F. Williamson of York University, Toronto, Canada. Most of the relevant information online is reproduced here. Mrs Dalgairns had the ‘The Practice of Cookery’ published in 1829, and republished up until 1860. This copy is a 2nd edition, published in Edinburgh in 1829, the same year as the 1st edition, also published there. Cagle has a 2nd, and proclaims it is not shown in any other bibliographies consulted. Interestingly Cagle's 2nd edition asks for 532 pages. This copy has 528 and appears to be complete. One can only assume the missing 4 pages are advertisements. Catherine Emily Callbeck Dalgairns was an upper-middle class amateur foodie. The goal of the book was to enable any cook or housekeeper of limited experience to know how to prepare well most dishes in fashion at the time. She hoped that, at the same time, it might "be no less useful to the mistress of a family, if required for occasional reference." She stated at the outset that she was not providing any new recipes, but trying to select the best amongst those "already established in public favour." She either tested them herself, or relied on the opinion of "persons whose accuracy in the various manipulations could be safely relied upon." She used an unusual and helpful method in her book. Instead of doing all her introductory remarks lumped together at the beginning of the book, she put relevant remarks at the start of each chapter. She provided both a chapter list at the front, and an index at the back. Catherine was born into a privileged family in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (PEI), approximately in the late 1780s. She had three sisters, and two brothers. She was very much a child of the British Empire. Though born on Prince Edward Island, she had relatives in Ireland, England and in the American colonies. Her parents were Phillips (sic) Callbeck (1743 to 28 February 1790) and Anne Coffin (1752 to 15 October 1826.) Her father was Attorney-General and Surrogate-General of Probate of the Island of St John (aka Prince Edward Island), then president of His Majesty's Council for the same colony. He owned 20,000 acres of land there. During the American Revolution, he was taken prisoner during a sally by two American privateers into Charlottetown Harbour, taken south to the American colonies, and handed over to Colonel George Washington. Washington set him free with a letter of apology. On 11 September 1808, Catherine married Peter Dalgairns (born in Scotland on 29 October 1793. The couple left PEI sometime shortly afterward, living first in London, then moving to Dundee, Scotland around 1822. In 1829, she published her cookbook. The couple never returned to Prince Edward Island. They both died in Dundee, Scotland: Catherine on 1 March 1844 and Peter in 1853. Occasionally, you may see her referred to as perhaps the first "Canadian" cookbook author. Her Canadian association is tenuous, though, and mostly an accident of birth. It may be more accurate to term her, as does Mary F. Williamson, a 'British North American'. As far as the cook book is concerned, being printed in Edinburgh by an author residing in Dundee, the recipes are not exclusively Scottish. The recipes are highly varied, with many French culinary terms. There are recipes for Currie, Indian Pancakes, Caveach of Fish, Meat Kebabs, a rather basic Sauce Robert, a Boudin a la’ Richlieu. An interesting and fairly original Cookery book. Oxford p163 for a 1st edition. Bitting a 6th of 1836.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11245

Dallas   Enaeas Sweetlands     Once owned and signed by G.A. Sala. [image below]
KETTNER'S BOOK OF THE TABLE.
KETTNER'S BOOK OF THE TABLE. A MANUAL OF COOKERY. PRCTICAL - THEORETICAL - HISTORICAL. Written in George Augustus Sala's small neat hand - "The literary and critical portion of this book was written by my very dear friend Enaeas S. Dallas, sometime of the " Times" Newspaper and Editor of "Once a Week". A poem form Paradise Regained. Somewhat obscured by stencilled holes of the FORBES LIBRARY. NORTHAMPTON. MASS. LONDON. DULAU AND CO. SOHO SQUARE.1877. A poem form Paradise Regained. Somewhat obscured by stencilled holes of the FORBES LIBRARY. NORTHAMPTON. MASS. LONDON. DULAU AND CO. SOHO SQUARE.1877.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. Marbled end-papers with Forbes Library bookplate. On verso -1 fep. 1p Half-title - THE BOOK OF THE TABLE and an inscription in Sala's neat hand - George Augustus Sala, 46 Mecklenburg Sq. W.C. 1878. On verso a two-line poem from Paradise Regained. Title Page. [1]. 1p dedication to GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA. [1]. 1-16 Introduction. 1p Half-title - THE BOOK OF THE TABLE. [1]. 19-500. 4 blanks for Notes. 1fep. Marbled end papers, Old red marbled boards with red leather quarter binding and tips, all with gilt lines. Red leather spine compartmentalised with dull gilt tooling. Internally a little brown aged but overall very clean. Also enclosed: 1p. 7x4.5 inches with minor creases. From the Reform Club 24th January - no year given. An autograph letter signed: "G.A. Sala to G.Linnaeus Banks, sending 'a doz. stamps for Shakespeare heads" and mentioning the Shakespeare committee business" Internally a little brown aged but overall very clean. Also attached: 1p. 7x 4.5 inches with minor creases. From the Reform Club 24th January - no year given. An autograph letter signed: "G.A. Sala to G.Linnaeus Banks, sending 'a doz. stamps for Shakespeare heads" and mentioning the Shakespeare committee business"
- Kettner’s was one of the first and oldest French restaurants in London. Opened in Romilly Street in Soho 1867 by August Kettner, known as a very fastidious chef to Napoleon III. English aristocracy in waistcoats, and in love, would bring their wives and their mistresses to try Kettner's French cuisine for the first time – feasts of carp fillets à la Duxelle, fried Gudgeon with asparagus in cream, devilled Kidney and thick Eel stews, all followed by Apple and Almond tarts for dessert. Ever popular with historical figures throughout its gilded history. King Edward VII is said to have courted his mistress, actress Lillie Langtry, there. They say that the philandering King had a secret underground passageway built between the restaurant and the Palace Theatre next door, so that his mistress could slip away after performances for an intermission of supper downstairs and a final act in the private rooms upstairs. The lounge and Champagne Bar have welcomed visitors including Oscar Wilde wining and dining the rent boy Charles Parker, Agatha Christie tucking into a bouillabaisse, Sir Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and Bing Crosby among others. Kettner’s wasn’t just part of Soho, it was Soho. It was the sordidness and the sobriety. Rising up around the restaurant over generations, Soho was built and re-built to be London’s den of iniquity. Today, a more discreet and gentile Kettner’s comprises seven Georgian townhouses, including the Grade II-listed club space and two bars, all carefully restored with close attention to original features and details. On the three top floors are 33 bedrooms and the Grade II-listed Jacobean Suite, with its own private entrance. The Kettner’s well known art collection is inspired by the buildings’ former risqué reputation. Now, as is the way of the world, the restaurant is re-branded, re-born. The continuation of the Kettner name may serve only as a wink to the past and a nod to the future, in the sober but still vibrant district of Soho. E.S. Dallas [Enaeas Sweetland Dallas] was the author of Kettners 'Book of the Table' and was a very good friend of Sala's. G.A. Sala, born in London, tried his hand at writing, at a very early date and in 1851 attracted the attention of Charles Dickens, who published articles and stories by him in Household Words and subsequently in All the Year Round, and in 1856 sent him to Russia as a special correspondent. In 1860, over his own initials "G.A.S.", he began writing "Echoes of the Week" for the Illustrated London News, and continued to do so till 1886, when they were continued in a syndicate of weekly newspapers almost to his death. William Makepeace Thackeray, when editor of the Cornhill, published articles by him on Hogarth in 1860, which were issued in column form in 1866; and in the former year he was given the editorship of Temple Bar, which he held till 1863. Meanwhile, he had become in 1857 a contributor to The Daily Telegraph, and it was in this capacity that he did his most characteristic work, whether as a foreign correspondent in all parts of the world, or as a writer of "leaders" or special articles. His literary style, highly coloured, bombastic, egotistical and full of turgid periphrasis, gradually became associated by the public with their conception of the Daily Telegraph; and though the butt of the more scholarly literary world, his articles were invariably full of interesting matter and helped to make the reputation of the paper. Sala died at Brighton on 8th December, 1895. In an email I received from Linda Gifkins, she kindly informed me of a hitherto unknown edition of Sala's quite rare book 'The Thorough Good Cook', printed by Brentano's - New York, Chicago, Paris, & Washington in 1896. Sala was twice married. His first wife, Harriet, whom he married in September 1859, died at Melbourne in December 1885. In 1891 he married a second wife, Bessie, third daughter of Robert Stannard, C.E., who survived him.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11251

Dalrymple.   George     - A sole edition. Very scarce
The Practice of Modern Cookery;
ADAPTED TO FAMILIES OF DISTINCTION, As well as to those of The MIDDLING RANKS of LIFE. To which is added, A GLOSSARY explaining the Terms of Art. By GEORGE DALRYMPLE, Late Cook to Sir John Whitefoord, Bart. EDINBURGH: Printed for the Author. Sold by C.ELLIOT, Edinburgh; and T.LONGMAN, London. MDCCLXXXI.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1781. 1fep. Title page. [1] 1p Dedication to Lady Whitefoord. [1] 1+vi Preface. 1+2-462. 1+464 Glossary of Terms. 1+466-475 Index. 1p Errata. 1fep. Title page evenly browned. Some minor foxing and staining to first six leaves. Some very light age browning throughout. Original dark brown sheep boards. Modern sympathetically rebound dark brown spine with raised bands and blind tooling. A dark brown label with gilt lettering and lines.
- George Dalrymple provides us with around one thousand recipes, giving them both English and French names. He is also one of the first cookery writers to give a glossary of terms. These points are remarkable according to Maclean. In his preface Dalrymple explains "there are a number of excellent receipts I have had occasionally from others..." – Maclean may be rather less enthused had she realised that Dalrymple plagiarized many of the recipes from the Frenchman, Bernard Clermont’s cookery book, ‘The Professed Cook' first edition, 1755. (which in turn is a translation of Menon’s French work ‘Les Soupers de la Cour). George Dalrymple had been cook to Sir John Whitfoord and the book is dedicated to his wife. Sir John, the third baronet, lived in Whitefoord House in the Canongate in Edinburgh. Whitfoord is supposed to have been the original of Sir Arthur Wardour in Scott's 'Antiquary' and was one of the early partrons of Burns who celebrated him in verse and who made his daughter Maria [Cranstoun] the heroine of the 'Braes of Ballochmyle'. He was a very well-known figure in the Scottish capital and was depicted in Kay along with his cronies, Major Andrew Fraser and the Hon. Andrew Erskine (Edinburgh Portraits, 1877, no. cxcii). Thus it can be assumed that Dalrymple had cooked for the great and the good of mid-seventeenth century Edinburgh. This is a sole edition and uncommon in most cookery book collections. An interesting read also. Vicaire 244; Oxford p.113; Bitting p.114; Cagle 640; Maclean p.37; Lehmann p.141.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11036

de Bonnefons.   Nicolas     An important milestone in the development of French Cuisine.
LE JARDINIER FRANCOIS.
QUI ENSEIGNE A CULTIVER les Arbres, & Herbes Potagers; Avec la maniere de conserver les Fruits, & fairetoutes fotes de Confritures, Conserves, & Massepains. DIEDE AUX DAMES. DIXIEME EDITION. Augmentee par l'autheur de plusients ex-periences qu'il a faites. [a printer's colophon] A PARIS, Chez NICOLAS LE GRAS, au troi-sieme Pillier de Grand'Salle, du Palais a L, couronnee. [a single long line] M. DC. LXXXIV. AVEC PERMISSION.
1684. Thick 8vo. 1 fep. Book Title page outlining the 3 Tomes. Tome 1: Le Jardinier François. [the French Gardener]. Title page. [1] Epistre aux Dames 10p.Preface 5p. [2] Frontispiece of a garden scene. 1-309. 6p. (miss-numbered) The Table. Tome 2. Les Delices de la Campagne. . [the Delights of the Countryside]. [1] Frontispiece of Garden workers. [1] Epistre aux Dames 4p. Preface 2p. [1] 2nd Frontispiece of a Baker. Title page. 2-321. 322-328 The Table. Title page: Tome 3. La Maniere de Cultiver des Arbres Fruiterers. [the Way of Cultivating Fruit Trees]. [1] Dedication 2p. Preface 22p. 1-126. [1] 2nd Title page. Instructions pour les Arbres Fruiterers. [Instructions for Cultivating Fruit Trees]. [1] Le Libraire au Lecteur 2p. 131-238. Tome 4. Title page: Traité des Chasses, des la Vénerie et Fauconnerie. [Treatise about things Venery and Falconry]. [1] 241-282. Table des Chapitres. 1fep. Some slight age dusting throughout. Bound in original full dark brown leather with raised bands on spine and a nice patination. Small piece of leather missing from back cover. Slight cracking to joints but holding well. Overall good condition.
- Bonnefons was a 17th century French writer who was also the 'valet de chambre' of Louis XIV. In the 1650's He published two very important cookery books; 'Le Jardinier François' and 'Les Delices de la campagne' which marked a major turning point in French cooking. In Melissa M. Wittmeier's well researched article online titled 'The Art of the Table in Eighteenth-Century France', she informs us that French cuisine changed very little during the Middle Ages. Even during the Renaissance when a type of more refined cooking was introduced, the French diet remained as it was and dominated by certain cereals and legumes for the poor, and by spicy, boiled meats for those who could afford them. Vegetables were generally considered indigestible with little to no health benefits attributed to them. During the reign of Louis XIV, [The Sun King] all of that changed. The king's preference for certain delicacies, his love for his garden and for the fruits and vegetables that it produced, set the stage for the culinary revolution and standards for fresh produce that would inspire so many great French Chefs still to follow in the future. When Louis XIV died in 1715, doctors noted upon conducting his autopsy that his stomach was three times the size of that of the average adult. Bonnefons noted in 'Les Delices de la campagne', that for the presentation, "the middle of the table will be left empty, since the master of the house will have difficulty in reaching it because of his girth." Several pages later, Bonnefons documented some "instructions for feasts"; the eight courses of the feast took more than six pages to describe and included so many plates that the Sun King's eating habits, his sumptuous and excessive repasts, his extravagant and lavish entertainment, became legendary. Bonnefon's books also elaborate in print a major change in cookery, where he emphasized cleanliness, complementary flavours and simplicity in food preparation. His oft-repeated quote; “Let a cabbage soup be entirely cabbage. . . and may what I say about soup be a law applied to everything that is eaten.” Because of Bonnefons close proximity to the King and his rare abundant gardens at Versailles, and also being a very good writer, this is a historically important book documenting Court cuisine and a practical progressive development in French cookery that ultimately was a major tenet that helped establish it as one of the world's major cuisines.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11294

De Swinfield.   Richard     - A presentation copy inscribed by the editor.
A Roll of Household Expenses
OF RICHARD DE SWINFIELD, BISHOP OF HEREFORD,DURING PART OF THE YEAR 1289 and 1290. EDITED BY THE REV. JOHN WEBB, M.A., F.S.A., M.R.S.L. (An engraved printers device; a possible portrait of Swinfield). PRINTED FOR THE CAMDEN SOCIETY. M.DCCC.L1111.
12mo. 223x168mm. Front paste-down and end-paper marbled. 2fep. (With a ms. inscription "T.E. Winnington, from the editor 1854). Title page. Verso, printers name & address. 1p Camden Society names. Verso, Camden Society disclaimer. 1p Dedication to Arcbishop of York. [1] (1)viii-xiii Preface. [1] 1p Header. [1] (1)xviii-ccxxxii Abstract and Illustrations. (3)4-108 The Roll. (3)112-197 The Endorsements. [1] (3)202-242 Appendix. (1)244-249 Glossary. [1] (1)252-267 General Index. [1] (1)270 Addenda et Corrigenda. 1fep. Rear paste-down and end-paper marbled. Contemporary dark bottle green morocco half binding with marbled boards. Spine with raised bands and gilt lettering in one compartment. With the bookplate of T.E. Winnington on the front paste-down. Internally very clean. A handsome copy.
- A record of Richard de Swinefield's expenses as bishop that survived for the years 1289 and 1290. The accounts offer a rare glimpse of the organisation and expenses of a major household in the time period. During the 296 days covered by the record, his household moved 81 times, with 38 of these stops associated with him visiting his diocese during April through June. The record also shows that he supported two scholars at Oxford University The record has been printed a number of times, including by the Camden Society in 1853 through 1855. This copy was printed in 1854. Richard de Swinfield's last name may come from Swingfield located near Folkestone, Kent. His father was Stephen of Swinfield, who died in 1282, and his brother Stephen remained a layman. Other information about his family and upbringing is unknown, nor is his day or year of birth. He earned a doctor of divinity degree, but the location of his university studies is unknown. By 1264 Swinefield was a member of the household of Thomas de Cantilupe, who went on to become Bishop of Hereford in 1275. Swinefield held the prebend of Hampton in the diocese of Hereford, before 1279 and held that prebend until his election as bishop. Shortly after 17 April 1280 he was named Archdeacon of London, having previously held an unknown prebend in the diocese of London. Swinefield was elected to the see of Hereford, or bishopric, on 1 October 1282. The election was confirmed by John Peckham, the Archbishop of Canterbury on 31 December 1282, and Swinefield was given custody of the spiritualities and temporalities, or the ecclesiastical and lay income producing properties of the see by 8 January 1293. He was consecrated on 7 March 1283. During Swinefield's time as bishop, he was not involved in politics, and spent most of his time in his diocese. He rarely attended Parliament, usually excusing himself on the grounds of urgent diocesan business or his own bad health. He inherited a number of lawsuits from his predecessor, which he managed to settle. Swinefield also resolved a dispute over the boundary between the diocese of Hereford and the diocese of St Asaph, a Welsh bishopric, with the settlement being not entirely to the Welsh bishop's liking. The town of Hereford also had disagreements with Swinefield, and on one occasion the bishop threatened excommunication against the town unless they submitted. Swinefield was concerned to ensure that his clergy were well treated. He worked to ensure that churches within his diocese were not misappropriated through the granting of custody to unworthy candidates, as well as trying to keep order in the monasteries. His main efforts though went toward securing the canonization of his predecessor Thomas de Cantilupe. This did not however take place until 1320, after Swinefield's death. Swinefield died on 15 March 1317, and was buried in Hereford Cathedral, where a memorial in the transept's north wall shows Swinefield dressed as a bishop and holding a building. (See photo 1 below) Two of his nephews were given offices within the diocese, with John given the precentorship in Hereford Cathedral, and Gilbert made the chancellor there. Another possible relative was Richard Swinfield, who also held a prebend in the diocese.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11089

Digby.   Sir Kenelme     - First Edition - 2nd Issue.
The CLOSET Of the Eminently Learned Sir Kenelme Digby Kt. Opened:
Whereby is DISCOVERED Several ways for making of Metheglin, Sider, Cherry-Wine, &c. (the 2nd PART) TOGETHER WITH Excellent Directions FOR COOKERY As also for Preserving, Conserving, Candying, &c. Published by his Son's Consent. London, Prinetd by E.C. & A.C. For H. Browne, at the West-End of St. Pauls, 1671.
FIRST EDITION - 2ND ISSUE. 2 Parts. 1ST PART: Marbled end-papers with lovely elaborate gilt tooling. 2 fep. [1] Portrait frontispiece of Digby aged 62. Title page. [1] 2p 'To the Reader'. 1-103. 2ND PART: COOKERY: 104 - 251. 8p 'The Table'. [1]. 3fep. Marbled endpapers with lovely elaborate gilt tooling. Very handsome honey coloured polished calf by Bayntun (Riviere). French fillet frame on covers, raised bands, spine elaborately gilt in compartments with elegant central floral bouquet stamp, two crimson labels, intricately gilt turn-ins. At some time the back cover has split on one side from the board and been expertly rejoined as before, without loss. Marbled end papers, all edges gilt. From the Spokane Public Library, with the perforated and ink stamp on the 'To the Reader' leaf and with same accession number printed by hand on another page. The Frontis and title page have had expert repairs to page edges with no loss. Very slight hint of soiling here and there, but overall a very pleasing copy of a book not often found in agreeable condition. The binding at some time have had the boards break form the spine and getting reset. Now completely tight and very handsome. A very scarce item.
- The Frontispiece and Title page are slightly darker than the rest due to the book being on display at the Spokane Public Library for protracted periods of time. It also appears that the very good repairs carried out to those same page edges, (without loss) was due to paper brittleness accrued while on display. The first edition was printed in 1669. NUC locates an aggregate of nine copies of the two editions in seven libraries. Digby (1603-65) was a writer, navel commander, diplomat, scientist, philosopher, privateer, religious conversationalist, and more. In his book he devotes 89 pages to metheglin, which he also calls meath, a honey based brew to which various spices are added. From meath, Digby moves on to other liquids, including his own complicated 'aqua mirablis' recipe, the ingredients of which include cloves, spearmint, marigold and sack. Gradually the entries progress to more solid food, porridges and broths and end with meats and sweets. A few recipes include apples but there is singularly little talk of vegetables. The description of "how to fatten young chickens in a wonderful degree" gives one an insight into the Brobdingnagian zest of an aristocracy that had no misgivings about its place at the top of the food chain. Lit up by candles to ensure round-the-clock feeding, chicks were fed a pap of pulped raisins, bread and milk , to make them so fat that; "they will not be able to stand, but lie down upon their bellies to eat". Sir Kenelme Digby, who became as plump and rotund as one of his chickens, died on 1665. His first edition - first issue of 1669, was printed posthumously by his steward, George Hartman who used the recipes from Digby's papers. Hartman in turn, printed a book of Cookery in 1682 called 'The True Preserver'

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10932

Dodoens.   Rembert     - The rare first ed. of 1578 with Thos. Campion's signature.
A Nievve Herball,
Or, HISTORIE OF PLANTES: wherein is contayned the vvhole discourse and per-fect description of all sortes of Herbes and Plantes: their diuers & sundry kindes: their straunge Figures, Fashions, and Shapes: their Names / Natures / Operations / and Ver-tues: and that not onely of those whiche are here growyng in this our Countrie of Englande / but of all others also of forrayne Realmes / commonly used in physicke. First set forth in the Doutche or Almaigne tongue, by that learned D. Rembert Do-doens, Physition to the Emperour: And nowe first translated out of French into English, by Hen-ry Lyte Esquyer. AT LONDON by m Gerard Dewes, dwelling in Pawles Churchyarde at the signe of the Swanne. 1578. Title within woodcut historiated border, with woodcut arms of the translator on verso.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1578. Large thick 4to. 295x202mm. 1fep. Engraved Title strengthened and reinforced at the edges with no loss. On the verso - Henry Lyte's coat of Arms and a crest "a swan volant silver upon a trumpet gold," (which was not actually granted him by Clarenceux King of Arms uпtil the following year). 2p, Dedication to Queen Elizabeth. 1p, Dedication to the friendly and indifferent Reader. 3p, Latin text headed W.B. and Thomas Newton. 1p, A commendation to Henry Lyte. 2p, To the Reader, in commendation of this worke. Verso - woodcut portrait of Dodoens. 4p, Medical credentials of Rembert Dodoens. 2p, Epistola ad Lectorem of Rembert Dodoens. 6p, Appendix. 1-779. 24p Index in Latin. (one page with srengtheened edge). On verso, Antwerp printers allegorical woodcut colophon. 2 feps, first blank with neat manuscript writing and on the last blank; Thomas Campion's signature. The first six pages and the engraved title page slightly dusty. With 870 woodcuts of plants. A full dark brown calf binding with blind tooled lines and device on the boards. The spine with raised bands, blind tooled lines and a red morocco label with gilt lettering. A nice copy of the very rare first with the wonderful woodcuts. (It was even described as very rare in the 17th century). Bookplate on front paste-down of Henry W. Poor.
- Rembert Dodoens, born Mechelen, Belgium on June 29, 1517, died in Leyden, Netherlands on March 10, 1585. He was a Flemish physician and botanist, also known under his Latinised name Rembertus Dodonaeus. In 1530 he started his studies of medicine, cosmography and geography at the University of Leuven, where he graduated in 1535, then establishing himself as a physician in Mechelen in 1538. He married Kathelijne De Bruyn(e) in 1539. From 1542-1546 he stayed in Basel. He turned down a chair at the University of Leuven in 1557, also turning down an offer to become court physician of emperor Philip II of Spain, instead choosing to became the court physician of the Austrian emperor Rudolph II in Vienna (1575-1578). He then became professor of medicine at the University of Leiden in 1582. Dodoens' great herbal ‘Cruydeboeck’, 1554, was influenced by the herbal of Leonhart Fuchs. He divided the plant kingdom in six groups. It treated in detail especially the medicinal herbs, which made this work, in the eyes of many, a pharmacopoeia. It was translated first into French in 1557 by Charles de L'Ecluse and called a ‘Histoire des Plantes’, and then into English (via L'Ecluse) in 1578 by Henry Lyte, and titled ‘A Neiwe Herbal, or Historie of Plants’. This first edition of the English translation was printed in folio at Antwerp, in order to secure the woodcuts of the original; the blocks being too heavy and valuable to transport. It has 779 pages mostly in black-letter and 870 woodcuts, about thirty of which are original. Lyte added very little original matter to the text. A second edition in square octavo and without any woodcuts, was printed in 1586 in London by Ninian Newton, and a third in 1595 by Edmund Bollifant in the same size. A folio edition also without woodcuts was published by Edward Griffin in 1619. In its time, it was the most translated book after the Bible. It became a work of worldwide renown, used as a reference book for two centuries. Dodoens's last book, ‘Stirpium Historiae Pemptades Sex sive Libri XXX’, 1583, was the Latin translation of his ‘Cruydeboeck’. It was used as a source by John Gerard for his Herball. The BL holds four copies; This first of 1578, other editions of 1586, 1595 and 1619. THOMAS CAMPION was born in London on February 12, 1567. He was a law student, a physician, a composer, a writer of masques and a poet. He went to Peterhouse College - Cambridge in 1581. In 1586 was admitted to Gray's Inn in London to study law. He participated in the Gray's Inn revels of 1588 and contributed songs to the Gesta Grayorum revels of 1594, but seems never to have been called to the bar. Campion's first poetic attempts were in Latin. His love of quantitative versification in classical Latin poems carried over into his English poems and songs. Campion was first published in 1591, when five of his songs appeared in Newman's unauthorized edition of Sidney's Astrophel and Stella. Four years later he published his own book, a collection of Latin epigrams, called Poemata (1595). Campion's reputation rests chiefly on his lyric poems, which are distinguished by their musical quality and charm. They were published 1601-1617 in four books of airs, beginning with A Booke of Ayres to be Sung to the Lute, Orpherian and Bass Viol (1601). Campion spent three years (1602-1605) on the Continent, and received the M.D. degree from the University of Caen in 1605. After returning to England, he practised as a doctor in London from 1606. During that time, he wrote several masques which were performed at the court of James I. Perhaps the best of them was the Lords' Masque (1613). In 1613 he also published A New Way of Making Fowre Parts in Counterpoint, a book on music theory. Campion died in London, probably of the plague, on March 1, 1620, and was buried at St. Dunstan's-in-the-West. Henry W. Poor whose bookplate is tipped into this book, was born in 1844, and was an American banker and publisher of 'Poors' Railway Manual'. He was also a famous wall street dealer, active in leather and ice securities garnering a fortune in excess of $5,000,000. He was a collector of fine art and had a library that was without equal anywhere in the country. He died in 1915.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11078