Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - signed by author & editor Herman Senn.
The Modern Cook
BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI EDITED BY C. HERMAN SENN. G.C.A. MACMILLAN AND CO. LIMITED ST. MARTIN'S STREET, LONDON 1911
12mo. 1fep. Half Title page. [1] Title page. With a signed handwritten dedication 'To Mr C.L. Rothsay. with C Herman Senn's best wishes and kindest regards CHS. Jan 1/19/12. [1] v-vi Preface. vii-viii Introduction. ix-xi Contents. [1] 1-471. [1] 473-508 Specimen Menus. 509-513 Wine Cups. 513=519 Glossary. [1] 521-546 Index. 1p Advertisement. [1] 1fep. Full red cloth binding with gilt writing on the spine. Overall clean but with cracked and rubbed edges. Internally very clean.
- Herman Senn was a very under-rated author and prolific writer of cookery books and one of the founders of the Universal Cookery and Food Association - UCFA. A hugely influential member of the English catering industry at that time. This is a late edition of Francatelli's classic cookery book edited and signed by Senn and as such is an unusual collectors copy.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11128

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - A rare item
A PLAIN COOKERY BOOK FOR THE WORKING CLASSES.
BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI, LATE MAITRE D'HOTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" AND "THE COOK'S GUIDE." LONDON; GEORGE ROUTELEDGE AND SONS, THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
FIRST EDITION - 1862: 12mo. A tipped-in new end-paper and fep. 4p. Advertisements. [1] Frontispiece. Title page. [1] (1)10-11 Introduction. [1] (1)14-101. (1)103-105. [1] p22 Advertisements. A tipped-in new fep and end-paper. Original cloth cover with blue printed lettering. A little soiled but still legible. Housed in a clam-shell box, dark brown half calf with matching brown cloth boards and calf corners. Raised bands with gilt lines. Two labels, green and red with gilt lettering. A rare copy in the original state.
- In 1852, Francatelli got the food company Brown and Polson to be a sponsor of this book. In return, he gave Brown and Polson space for a large advertisement at the back, and mentioned their products by name in several of the recipes. This little volume is by far the scarcest of all Francatelli's books. It was a novel and astute idea for a popular cookery book, and was very popular with poorer people who could not afford the recipes of the cook books recording the abundant consumption of the landed gentry in their great houses. In 1854, Soyer published his equally famous little book 'A Shilling Cookery for the People' that one suspects was his response and reaction to the popularity of Francatelli's original effort, which also became over time much scarcer than Soyer's. It is easy to see why. The delicate stitching, the easily soiled covers coupled with the relative simplicity of the recipes, plus the fact they were viewed as booklets rather than books, ensured they were not overly valued. Most likely stored badly in a kitchen drawer or shelf and not considered worthy of a place of relative safety next more expensive and cherished books. This is reflected in the fact that they are very rare in the complete state and much valued by collectors.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10958

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - In amazing original condition.
The Cook's Guide and Housekeeper's & Butler's Assistant;
A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON ENGLISH AND FOREIGN COOKERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES; CONTAINING PLAIN INSTRUCTIONS FOR PICKLING AND PRESERVING VEGETABLES, FRUITS, GAME, &C, The Curing of Hams and Bacon; THE ART OF CONFECTIONARY AND ICE-MAKING, AND THE ARRANGEMENT OF DESSERTS. WITH VALUABLE DIRECTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF PROPER DIET FOR INVALIDS; ALSO FOR A VARIETY OF WINE-CUPS; AND EPICUREAN SALADS, AMERICAN DRINKS, AND SUMMER BEVERAGES. BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI. PUPIL OF THE CELEBRATED CAREME, SEVEN YEARS CHEF DE CUISINE TO THE REFORM CLUB, AND MAITRE-D'HOTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" WITH UPWARDS OF FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS. FIFTY-THIRD THOUSAND. LONDON; RICHARD BENTLEY & SON, NEW BURLINGTON STREET, PUBLISHERS IN ORDINARY TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 1884. (ALL Right Reserved)
175x125mm. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece. Title page with tissue guard. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface. (1)viii Illustrations.(1)x-xx Contents. (1)2-463. [1] 465-496 Bills of Fare. 497-500 Glossary. 501-524 Index. 1fep. Fully bound in pristine original chocolate brown cloth with ornamental black tooling all over and bright gilt writing on the spine. Speckled edges. In extra fine condition, almost as new, with very slight foxing on the frontis.
- Charles Elmé Francatelli was English by nationality. He wrote several important cookbooks, and held one of the most prestigious cooking positions in England at that time. In 1840 or 1841, he started work for Queen Victoria as Maitre d'Hotel and 'Chief Cook in Ordinary' at Windsor, staying there for four years. This is a late edition of Francatelli's 'Cook's Guide' which are not uncommon. What makes this copy so desirable is the remarkable original condition. What one wonders when seeing this book, is where has it been kept for the last 125 years. A fine collector's item or very nice present.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11145

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - The rare first edition
The Cook's Guide and Housekeeper's & Butler's Assistant;
A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON ENGLISH AND FOREIGN COOKERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES; CONTAINING PLAIN DIRECTIONS FOR PICKLING AND PRESERVING VEGETABLES, FRUITS, GAME, &C, The Curing of Hams and Bacon; THE ART OF CONFECTIONARY AND ICE-MAKING, AND THE ARRANGEMENT OF DESSERTS. WITH VALUABLE DIRECTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF PROPER DIET FOR INVALIDS; ALSO FOR A VARIETY OF WINE-CUPS; AND EPICUREAN SALADS,AMERICAN DRINKS, AND SUMMER BEVERAGES. BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI. PUPIL OF THE CELEBRATED CAREME, AND MAITRE-D'HOTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" WITH UPWARDS OF FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS. LONDON; RICHARD BENTLEY, NEW BURLINGTON STREET. 1861. (Right of Translation is Reserved)
FIRST EDITION. 1861. 1fep. Frontispiece with light water stains and slight foxing. Title page.[1] 1+iv-vi Preface. a2 Postscript.[1] 1+viii Illustrations. 1+x-xx Contents. 1+2-452. 1+454-484 Bills of Fare. 1+486-488 Glossary. 1+490-512 Index. p22 of very interesting Advertisements on pink paper. 1fep. Two plates of Appetisers facing pages 114 and 130 . Original bottle green cloth boards with blind tooling and a neatly relaid and slightly darkened original cloth spine with blind tooling and gilt writing. The guttering has been strengthened. With twenty nine in-text and two full page illustrations. A very nice copy in the original state.
- Despite his name and his French training, Charles Elmé Francatelli was English by nationality. He wrote several important cookbooks, and held in succession three of the most prestigious cooking positions in England at that time. Francatelli, of Italian ancestry, was born in London in 1805, but grew up in France. There, he learnt cooking, getting a diploma from the Parisian College of Cooking, and working under the great French chef Marie Antonin Carême. (Some sense of Careme's grand influence can be seen in this book from p197 where in-text illustrations, of Pates, Timbales, Chartreuses, Mazarines and Croustades etc. enhance the recipes.) Upon his return to England, he worked for various places and people of distinction; such as Rossie Priory and Chesterfield House; As 'Chef de Cuisine' for the Earl of Chesterfield; At Chislehurst in Kent for Sir Herbert Jenner-Fust; At the Coventry House Club; He also cooked for the Earl of Errol. On February 4th 1839, he started as 'Chef de Cuisine' at Crockford's Club in London, taking over from the previous chef Louis Eustache Ude, who had just quit in a salary dispute at the start of February. (Disraeli didn't think much of Francatelli's chances at following in Ude's footsteps, but time was to prove him wrong.) He didn't stay at Crockford's long, though; by 1840 or 1841, he started work for Queen Victoria as Maitre d'Hotel and 'Chief Cook in Ordinary' at Windsor, staying there for four years. In 1845, he published his book "The Modern Cook." in England and in America the following year. The book sold well on both sides of the Atlantic. In it, he advocated two courses for meals -- a savoury followed by dessert, which is still mostly the norm today. In 1850, he then became 'Chef de Cuisine' at the Reform Club, taking over from Alexis Soyer, who had resigned in May of that year. Francatelli worked there with distinction for seven years. In 1852, he got the food company Brown and Polson to be a sponsor of his very rare little book, "A Plain Cookery-Book for the Working Classes". In return, he gave Brown and Polson space for a large advertisement at the back of the book, and mentioned their products by name in several of his recipes. In 1861 he published this book, "The Cook's Guide and Housekeeper's & Butler's Assistant", which became the book of reference for any well-managed household. His last job was at the Freemasons' Tavern in London. He died on 10 August 1876 at Eastbourne, England. The Times ran an obituary for him on 19 August 1876 titled "An Illustrious Chef" (page 4 of that day's paper.) As a small footnote, it is known that a younger cousin of his, whom he never met, Laura Mabel Francatelli (c. 1880 or 1881 - 2 June 1967), survived the Titanic. She was travelling as secretary to Lady (Lucy) Duff-Gordon, a fashion designer at the time, who also used a sister of Laura, Phyllis Francatelli, as a model.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11028

Frazer.   Mrs     - Curry in old Edinburgh !**
THE PRACTICE OF COOKERY, PASTRY, AND CONFECTIONARY;
IN THREE PARTS: Containing, Part 1.- Receipts for macking up all kinds of plain and dressed Dishes, Soops, Sau-ces, Ragoos, Fricasses, &c. Part 11- Pies, Pasties, Pud-dings, Dumplings, Custards, Pancakes, Fritters, &c. Part 111.- Picklings and Pre-serving; Barley Sugars, Tab-lets, Cakes, Biscuits, Cheese Cakes, Tarts, Jellies, Creams, Syllabubs, Blamange; Fowls and Fishes in Jelly, with other elegant Deserts. WITH RECEIPTS FOR MAKING Wine, Vinegar, Ketchups, Syrups, Cordials, Possets, &c. Lists of Dinner and Supper Dishes: and of Articles in Season; and Directions for Carving, Trussing, &c. ILLUSTRATED WITH PLATES. By Mrs FRAZER, Confectioner, TEACHER OF THESE ARTS IN EDINBURGH. THE FIFTH EDITION IMPROVED AND ENLARGED. EDINBURGH: PRINTED FOR PETER HILL 1806.
1fep. Half Title.[1] Title page.[1] (5)+6-7 Preface. [2] 2 Engraved plates, sometimes the 2 plates are at the front as a frontispiece. [1] (1)+2-294. (1)+296-304 Index. 1fep. Full modern dark brown calf with blind tooling on the boards. Raised bands on the spine with blind tooling, gilt lines and 2 crimson labels with gilt lettering. Very clean internally with the last page of the Index slightly age browned. A handsome copy.
- Based on the format of Mrs MacIver’s 'Cookery and Pastry' of 1773 which was originally published for pupils at the school run by Maciver where Mrs Frazer taught. On the former’s death Mrs Frazer succeeded her in running the cookery school and became the sole cookery teacher in Edinburgh, or so she claimed. The recipes are really useful and clearly written, as befitted a teacher, and are indicative of the age, incorporating traditional food with such new concepts as curry. The latter is interesting as curry recipes only started appearing in the 1780s and Frazer’s recipe calls for a new ingredient, ready-made curry powder. One can only imagine and smile at the remarks made by Edinburgh people when first encountering this exotic concoction. Frazer’s book was extremely popular running into several editions, the eighth appeared in 1827. (Sophie Schneideman Cat.5. Feb.09)

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11048

Glasse   Mrs [Hannah]    
THE COMPLETE ART OF COOKERY,
EXHIBITED IN A PLAIN AND EASY MANNER; WITH DIRECTIONS FOR MARKETING; THE SEASONS FOR MEAT, POULTRY, FISH, GAME, ETC. AND NUMEROUS USEFUL FAMILY RECEIPTS. BY MRS GLASSE. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY J. S. PRATT. MDCCCXLV.
130x76mm (5" X 3") 2feps. – 1 is an ex-libris sheet with no name. [1]Frontispiece with a double line border. Title page. [1] (1)6-24. Contents (1)26-320. 1fep. With numerous in-text engravings. New blue cloth binding with gilt lettering on the spine. Internally very clean with the pages very slightly aged. A handsome copy of this late copy of Hannah Glasse's great classic. Almost classifies as a miniature. 32 pages less text than the first edition of 1842.
- A nice copy of this desirable late edition of Hannah Glasse’s famous classic first seen in 1747.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11188

Glasse.   Hannah     - A signed copy with rare frontispiece and Publishers 1st manuscript recipe for Turtle.
The ART of COOKERY MADE PLAIN and EASY
Which far exceeds anything yet published. CONTAINING, 1. Of Roasting, Boiling, etc. 11. Of Made-Dishes. 111.Read this Chapter and you will find how Expensive a Fench Cook's Sauce is. 1V. To make a Number of pretty little Dishes fit for a Supper or Side-Dish, and little Corner-Dishes for a Great Table; and the rest you have in the Chapter for Lent. V. To dress Fish. V1. Of Soops and Broths. V11. Of Puddings. V111. Of Pies> 1X. For a Lent Dinner, a Number of good Dishes, which you make use of for a Table at any other Time. X. Directions for the Sick. X1. For Captains of Ships. X11. Of Hogs Puddings, Sausages, etc. X11. To pot and make Hams, etc. X1V. Of Pickling. XV. Of making Cakes, etc. XV1. Of Cheesec akes, Creams, Jellies, Whip Syllabubs, etc. XV11. Of Made Wines, Brewing, French Bread, Muffins, etc. XV111. Jarring, Cherries, Preserves, etc. X1X. To make Anchovies, Vermicella, Catchup, Vinegar, and to keep Artichokes, French Beans, etc. XX. Of Distilling. XX1. How to Market; the Seasons of the Year for Butchers Meat, Poultry, Fish, Herbs, Roots, etc and Fruit. XX11. A certain Cure for the Bite of a Mad Dog. By Dr. Mead. XX111. A Receipt to keep clear from Buggs. To which are added, By Way of APPENDIX, 1. To dress a Turkey, the West-India Way. 11. To make Ice Cream. 111. A Turkey, etc. in Jelly. 1V. To make Citron. V. To candy Cherries ot Green Gauges. V1. To make Ironmoulds out of Linnen. By a LADY. The FOURTH EDITION with ADDITIONS. LONDON: Printed for the AUTHOR, and sold at the Bluecoat-Boy, near the Royal-Exchange: at Mrs Sshburn's China-Shop, The Corner of Fleet-Ditch; at the Leg and DIal, in Fleet-Street; at the Prince of Wales's Arms, in Tavistock Street in Civet-Garden; by W. Innys, in Pater-noster Row; J. Hodges on London-Bridge; T. Trye, near Gray's-Inn-Gate, Holburn; J. Brotherton, in Cornhill; and by te Booksellers in Town and Country. M.DCC.LI. [Price 4s. stictch'd, and 5s. bound] *** This BOOK is publish'd with His MAJESTY's Royal Licence; and whoever prints it, or any Part of it, will be prosecuted.
8vo. 1751 - 4th edition. Trade card frontispiece with the last line cropped in half. Title page. 4p To the reader. 20p The contents. 1-334. Full rich burgundy calf, with ornate French-style gilt tooling to spine compartments, with raised bands, with black label and gilt lettering. The boards have gilt lines, gilt edges, the paste-down and end-paper in marbled paper with intricate gilt on the edge of the paste-down. The fore-edge marbled. The text block has been slightly cropped with no loss and very lightly age browned through out, but quite clean overall. On page 1, Hannah Glasse has signed her name in ink. It is not the facsimile signature common in other copies. Also attached is a one page publisher's manuscript with the recipe "To dress a Turtle in the West India Way" written in a fine cursive script. The document that has been folded with the title written on the outside of the folds. This is a common way of the time for filing papers. It is in fine condition with a small tear to one of the folds.
- Hannah Glasse's well known cookery book was first published in folio in 1747. It was an anonymous work 'By a Lady' It was not until four years later in this 4th edition of 1751 that Hannah Glasse's name appears for the first time on the beautifully designed and unique engraved trade card frontispiece. It states -- Hannah Glasse - Habit-Maker To Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, in Tavistock Street - Covent Garden. The frontis is very rare. It has been missing from all other copies of the 4th edition seen by this compiler. Mrs. Pennell had a copy and had the trade card reproduced on page 42 of her book, ‘My Cookery Books.’ The frontis also provides solid evidence for the first time that this popular cookery book was indeed written by a woman, disputing Dr Johnson's famously pointed, but misguided quip about 'The Art of Cookery' -- "Woman can spin very well, but they cannot make a good book of Cookery" This most popular English writer of cookery books was hostile to French cooking. She viewed French cooking as a wasteful extravagance but her book is full of stews, roasts, boiled beef, fricassees, and deep fried dishes. Most of her recipes are more complicated than comparable French recipes from the same period. Many of Glasse's recipes, like those of her female contemporaries were the backbone of English cuisine. From her savory veal pies and baked salmon to her pickles and apple tarts, the recipes are in fact more practical than their French counterparts and many are still used in England today. Hannah did not own her book for long, as the sixth edition is the last one that she edited herself before selling the copyright. Many later revised editions started to appear because the Glasse text had a lot of shareholders who quickly began printing their own copies. However, this fourth edition is completely unique, because of Glasse's own signature, and with the hitherto unseen frontis, along with the enclosed publisher's manuscript for dressing a "Turtle the West Indian Way", that was also printed for the first time as an appendix to this edition, ensures altogether, a very handsome and rare item.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10968

Glasse.   Mrs [Hannah]    
THE COMPLETE ART OF COOKERY,
EXHIBITED IN A PLAIN AND EASY MANNER; WITH DIRECTIONS FOR MARKETING; THE SEASONS FOR MEAT, POULTRY, FISH, GAME, ETC. AND NUMEROUS USEFUL FAMILY RECEIPTS, ETC. BY MRS GLASSE. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY J.BARR & Co. 5, LITTLE FRIDAY STREET, CHEAPSIDE. MDCCCXLII.
130x76mm (5" X 3") 1fep. [1]Frontispiece with a double line border. Title page. [1] (1)6-24 Contents. (1)26-307. 308-323 Bills of Fare. 324-352 Useful Family Receipts. 1fep. With numerous in-text engravings. Slightly faded blue blind tooled full original cloth binding. The spine has be re-backed with a small chip missing and one gilt letter of the title. Internally very clean with the pages very slightly aged. A handsome copy of this small late copy of Hannah Glasse's great classic.
- Quite what Hannah Glasse would have made of this tiny tome published by J. Barr in 1842 almost 100 years after her famous first edition of 1747, we can only guess. As famous and unique as Glasse's folio first edition is, this very small late edition is at the opposite end of the scale and surely just as different and unusual. It is very scarce, especially in this fine condition. It is one of those items that if seen while out book hunting, has an immediate 'buy me' appeal, even if found in poor condition.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11125

Glasse.   Hannah     - The rare folio 1st edition of 1747.
The ART of COOKERY MADE PLAIN and EASY
Which far exceeds any Thing of the Kind yet Published. CONTAINING, 1. Of Roasting, Boiling, etc. 11. Of Made-Dishes. 111.Read this Chapter and you will find how Expensive a French Cook's Sauce is. 1V. To make a Number of pretty little Dishes fit for a Supper, or Side-Dish, and little Corner-Dishes for a Great Table; and the rest you have in the Chapter for Lent. V. To dress Fish. V1. Of Soops and Broths. V11. Of Puddings. V111. Of Pies. 1X. For a Fast-Dinner, a Number of good Dishes, which you may make use of for a Table at any other Time. X. Directions for the Sick. X1. For Captains of Ships. X11. Of Hog's Puddings, Sausages, etc. X11. To pot and Make Hams, etc. X1V. Of Pickling. XV. Of making Cakes, etc. XV1. Of Cheesecakes, Creams, Jellies, Whip Syllabubs, etc. XV11. Of Made Wines, Brewing, French Bread, Muffins, etc. XV111. Jarring and Cherries, Preserves, etc. X1X. To make Anchovies, Vermicella, Ketchup, Vinegar, and to keep Artichokes, French Beans, etc. XX. Of Distilling. XX1. How to Market; the Seasons of the Year for Butchers Meat, Poultry, Fish, Herbs, Roots, etc and Fruit. XX11. A certain Cure for the Bite of a Mad Dog. By Dr. Mead. BY A LADY. A engraved printer's device between lines. LONDON: Printed for the AUTHOR, and sold at Mrs Ashburn's, a China-Shop, The Corner of Fleet-Ditch. [Price 3s.6 (the 6 written by hand) stictch'd, and 5s. bound]
FIRST EDITION 1747. Folio. 287x184 mm. 1 fep. Title page with the the handwritten 6 after the 3s as called for in the last line. [1] 2 pages of Subscribers. 11 pages of Contents with small one inch piece with no loss missing from 1st page.1 page A small Instruction by Glasse. (1)ii To the Reader. (1)4 - 166, although miss-paginated; page numbers 66/67 and 136/137 missing with no loss to text (This miss-pagination matches Cagle's copy). 1 fep. Pages 37 - 41 with some foxing. All other pages very clean. Title page and edges slightly age browned. Spine and tips bound in sprinkled dark-brown half calf and boards marbled. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and tooled devices in compartments with red morocco label. A very fine copy.
- ‘The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy’ was written by Hannah Glasse and published in 1747 in its famous folio format. Even though it was expensive at 5 shillings for a bound copy or 3.6 shillings unbound, it was an instant success, and was a best seller for over a hundred years, being published continuously until 1843. This made Glasse one of the best-known cookery writers of the eighteenth century. She was not supplanted as a culinary authority until the work of Mrs. Isabella Beeton appeared in 1861 over a century later. The books of those famous ladies being two of the cornerstone works needed in the building of an English culinary library. As Hannah Glasse explains in the preface, the book was intended to be an instruction manual for servants - 'the lower sort' as she called them. As Hannah puts it, the book should 'improve the servants and save the ladies a great deal of trouble'. She is dismissive of the fanciful language used by other cookery book writers, which she feels simply confuses the servants: 'the poor girls are at a loss to know what they mean,' she writes. In contrast, her style is precise and direct. The power of her book though is the clarity of the writing. She's authoritative but she is also intimate, treating you as an equal. Even though a large percentage of the recipes were plagarised, even reproduced verbatim from recipes published in earlier books by other writers, she shows a great deal of her own skill and originality. It is an unprecedentedly comprehensive recipe book with simple instructions, accessible ingredients, an accent on thrift (even though she recommends in the preface that half a pound of butter is enough to fry 12 eggs), easy recipes and practical help with weights and timing, which was a big step up from previous works. Her writing style is lively, intelligent and amusing. Glasse is scornful of the elaborate and extravagant French recipes of the period, but many of her recipes will have been influenced by French cuisine, which was becoming increasingly fashionable at the time. This does not inhibit Glasse from including the earliest recipe in an English cookbook for Indian curry, albeit with just black pepper and coriander. No Huldi, Lal Mirch, Methi, Jeera etc. Even though the ‘Art of Cookery’ was a ground breaking effort that generated much interest, the fame and survival of Hannah Glasse’s book is not due to her genius or her ability as a cook, as she was neither, but for four years following its publication, there were widespread rumours that ‘The Art of Cookery’ had been written by a man. For a woman to have written such an eloquent and well-organised work seemed implausible to many. James Boswell's diary records a party at the house of the publisher Charles Dilly, at which the issue was discussed. He quotes Samuel Johnson as saying, 'Women can spin very well; but they cannot make a good book of cookery.' Many others also believed this. It was not till she edited and published her fourth edition of 1751 that Johnson’s ill-advised quip was proved false. Due to the negative press generated by the popular book being first written and published by ‘A Lady’, Glasse inserted her trade card as a handsome engraved frontispiece and signed the first page of recipes, putting to rest all the speculation. (See my 1751 edition – item number 10968 in this website). This first edition is extremely scarce, but just how scarce is hard to figure, even after a lot of research. Due to demand the second edition was published in the same year; 1747. This strongly indicates that the first print run was very small. As can be seen in the Subscriber’s list printed in the first edition, there are 202 names. Assuming the subscribers all received a copy and there was enough cash to print a few more, we can possibly assume a print run of no more than 500 copies. Scarce indeed! --- COPAC lists only 10 firsts of 1747 out of 491 copies of various other editions in British holdings. As could be expected there are substantially more second editions listed. This cookbook has a somewhat iconic status that is hard to believe. Along with Beeton's equally rare original 24 booklets of 'Household Management' published before she brought out the 1st edition in book form, they both fetch silly money when they do appear at auction. --- Bitting, pages 186-87; The STC by Virginia Maclean, page 59; Cagle, pages 497-8; Arnold Oxford, pages 76-77; The Cetus Library, sold at Bloomsbury Auctions, lot 149: Marcus and Elizabeth Crahan collection sold at Sothebys, p317; Andre Simon Bibliotheca Gastronomica , 761;

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11212

Glasse.   Hannah    
THE Complete Confectioner:
OR, THE Whole Art of Confectionary Made Plain and Easy. SHEWING, THe various Methods of PRESERVING and CANDYING, both dry and liquid, all Kinds of Fruit, Flowers, and Herbs; the different Ways of CLARIFYING SU-GAR; and the Method of Keeping Fruit, Nuts, and Flowers fresh and fine all the Year round. ALSO DIRECTIONS for making Rock-Works and Carrots, Biscuits, Rich Cakes, Creams, Custards, Jellies, Whip Syllabubs, and Cheese-Cakes of all Sorts, Strong Cordials, Simple Waters, Mead, Oils, etc. Syrups of all Kinds, Milk Punch that will keep 20 Years, Knicknacks and Trifles for Deserts, etc. etc. etc. etc. LIKEWISE, The Art of making Artificial Fruit, with the Stalks in it, so as to resemble the natural Fruit. To which are added, Some Bills of Fare for Deserts for Private Families. By H. GLASSE, Author of the Art of Cookery. LONDON. Printed for J. Cooke at Shakespear's Head, in Pater-noster Row. MDCCLXXII.
8vo. Title page. 2p - To the HOUSEKEEPERS. 1-304. [1-XV1 CONTENTS] Internally very lightly age browned but overall, very clean. Half Dark brown calf with marbled boards. Raised bands with gilt lines and red label with gilt writing. Very good modern binding. A lovely copy of a scarce book.
- It has interestingly, 2 facsimile signatures of H. Glasse. One at the end of the notes for the Housekeepers and the other on the facing page. There are also 12 pages of Bills of Fare. This copy is the 1st edition 3rd issue of 1772. The 1st Edition, 1st issue was published - 1760. The 2nd issue, published 1765.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10969