Mrs Nourse.       An early Edinburgh cookery school.
MODERN PRACTICAL COOKERY,
PASTRY, CONFECTIONARY, PICKLING AND PRESERVING. (two small double lines) By MRS NOURSE, TEACHER OF THESE ARTS, EDINBURGH. (two small double lines) ILLUSTRATED WITH COPPERPLATES. FOURTH EDITION IMPROVED AND ENLARGED. (two small double lines) EDINBURGH printed by Michael Anderson. SOLD BY THE AUTHOR, 6, GEORGE STREET; MACREDIE SKELLY & CO; 34, PRINCESS STREET; BRASH & CO. GLASGOW; GEORGE COWIE & CO. LONDON; J. CUMMING, DUBLIN; AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS. (one small line) 1821
179 x 108 x 14mm. 2feps. [1] Frontis of trussing. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface to the 2nd edition. (1)Advertisement to the 3rd Edition. (1)Advertisement to the 4th edition. (1)viii - xxiv Contents. (1)2 - 335. 3 plates of An Elegant Dinner with a quarter missing. 2feps. Internally a little smudged and age dusted. With a quarter brown calf and marbled boards and brown calf tips. The spine with raised bands, gilt tooling and lettering.
- In a fine article online by Eleanor Harris of the Episcopal Congregation of Charlotte Chapel website, she has written a quite detailed article about Mrs Nourse. She was born Elizabeth Burn to Walter Burn, a gardener in Hawick and Janet Ker. Her birth date not found. She married her husband John Nourse on November 18th, 1793 at Hawick. They had four children in quick succession from 1794,95,96 and 1797. Mrs Nourse practised her trade as a pastry-cook and confectioner in partnership with her husband until his death circa 1805. She then became proprietor of a New Town, Edinburgh pastry school. Due to encouragement from Pupils, Customers and friends, and to finance the publication she cannily opened a subscription book at her shop on 38 Princess St, to which a large number subscribed, and in 1809 she self-published the 1st edition of Modern Practical Cookery. In Eleanor Harris's article an unusual snippet records that in 1811 she was living in George St, in a house with 15 windows and a rent of £70 and received allowances for her children. Modern Practical Cookery was popular and reached its 3rd edition on 1813, with this improved and enlarged 4th edition of 1821. Another addition appeared in 1832. It also achieved wide commercial publication and distribution by William Blackwoods, and widely advertised and sold at Cadell's in the Strand, London. A Belfast edition also appeared around this time. It is not clear when she passed away but in1845 an edition was published by Armour and Ramsey of Montreal, Canada. This assured Mrs Norse posthumous fame, her curried chicken and rice soup appearing at heritage events at the Campbell House Museum, Toronto and the Culinary-Tourism Symposium. In writing this condensed version of Eleanor Harris's article I'm struck by Mrs Nourse's industriousness. She is of the same mould as other women cooks who also became cookery book writers like Hannah Glasse, Mary Kettilby, Eliza Smith, Mary Eales, Agnes Marshall, Elizabeth Moxon, Elizabeth Raffald et al, who extended themselves, because of sheer necessity, from the hot demanding kitchens to publishing. Full lives indeed, to our benefit.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11260

Murray.   Ross     - rare recipes for Swan.
THE MODERN HOUSEHOLDER:
A MANUAL OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. COMPILED AND EDITED BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. With original Illustrations Printed in Colours by Tronheim. AND NUMEROUS WOODCUTS. (A round printer’s device for Warne and Co.) LONDON: FREDERICK WARNE AND CO. BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN. NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND ARMSTRONG.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION - 1st ISSUE. Thick 8vo. 194 x 135 mm. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece of Potatoes. 1 tissue-guard. Title page. [1] (1)vi Preface. (1)viii Contents. (1)x List of Coloured Plates. (1)x List of Woodcuts. (1)2-689. (1)691-722 Index. 2p Advertisements. 1fep. 19 Coloured plates. Many In-text woodcut Illustrations. Very clean internally. Modern ¼ leather binding with marbled boards. Flat spine with gilt lines and text. In very good condition.
- Interestingly, there are 2 exact same copies of this book except for the frontispieces. They are different in both copies. One has as a frontis of the colour plate that faces page 54, featuring various flower ornamentations. This copy has the frontispiece, illustrating the various types of potatoes. This was published first, and one suspects, that because the publishers did not issue a large print run, and due to higher demand, they inserted the other forntis for the second issue. The book format is similar to Beeton’s great household management book, especially with the fine colour plates and in-text b/w woodcut illustrations. In many ways it also as interesting as Beeton’s but quite different in content. An example is Ross Murray’s recipes on pages 338/9 for roasting and making gravy from Swan. As can be seen online, there are many articles on the cooking of Swans, with some of the information edited and reproduced here: Due to the law since the 12th century, all swans at liberty on open waters belong to the Crown by prerogative right, and are the property of the Crown. Mute swans (the common Eurasian swan we see in UK, having the familiar white plumage and an orange-red bill with a black knob at the base) also have statutory protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act. By 1378 the office of 'Keeper of the King's Swans' was in existence and a document exists, entitled, "The Lawes, Orders and Customs for Swans", dating to 1482/3. From a gastronomic viewpoint, mature swans have little subcutaneous fat and their flesh is exceedingly dry, making them a tough and entirely unsuitable subject for barbecuing. This is what Ross Murray writes; “The cygnets when all hatched are of a slate-grey, which grows lighter as they grow older. The cygnets of the wild swan are white. But it is of the grey cygnets we have to speak. They are hatched in June. If they are intended for the kitchen, they are put into a separate swan pond at the end of August or the first week in September. After they have been "hopped or upped", as it is called, from their native place, grass is thrown to them twice a day with their other food for a fortnight. They are fattened on barley: a coomb (4 bushels) for each cygnet suffices for the fattening. Cygnets can only be fattened before the white feathers appear; after that no further feeding will do any good. As soon as a white feather shows they will cease fattening, no matter what food they have. They can consequently only be eaten in December, and they are a capital and magnificent Christmas dish. Their weight then will be from 25 lbs to 28 lbs.” They were slaughtered the moment their white adult plumage appeared, which pretty well coincided with Christmas. They were seven months old and very obese. Murray goes on to tell us that swan was a popular local dish in Norfolk and explains how they were roasted in homes in that county on a spit in front of the fire as a Christmas dish. He explains that the finished swan was garnished with four little swans carved out of turnips and 'a paper frill, nicely cut, about the shoulders. Other famous Chefs have recipes for swan in their cookery books. Published by the 17th century master cook Robert May, in his famous tome entitled; ‘The Accomplisht Cook’, (item # 10965 on this site) he gives recipes for 'A Swan roast' and 'A Swan Pye'. Nearly a hundred years after May published the bill of fare above, another Christmas dinner featuring a swan pie, this time as a centrepiece for the first course appeared in John Thacker's The Art of Cookery (Newcastle upon Tyne: 1758). Thacker was the cook to the Dean and Chapter at Durham Cathedral where there had been a swannery since well before the Reformation. Edward Kidder also published in his beautiful cookery book (see item # 10966 on this site), a small recipe for Swan Pye on page 6.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11243

Murrell.   John     - Extremely rare early edition.
Mvrrels Tvvo Books of Cookerie and Carving.
1st TITLE PAGE: (a straight line) The fifth time printed with Additions. (a straight line) LONDON, Printed by M.F. for John Mar-riot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet-street. 1638. The text surrounding by a double line border. 2nd TITLE PAGE: THE SECOND BOOKE OF COOKERIE. (a straight line) VVherein is set forth the newest and most commendable Fashion of Dressing, Boyling, Sowcing, or Roast-ing, all manner either Fleash, Fish, or any kinde of Fowle. (a straight line) Together with an exact order of ma-king Kickshawes, or made-dishes, of any fashion, fit to beautifie either Noble-mans or Gentle-mans Table. (a straight line) All set forth according to the new English or French fashion. BY JOHN MURRELL. (a straight line) The fifth Impression. (a straight line) LONDON, Printed for John Marriot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dun-stans Church-yard. 1638. THE THIRD TITLE PAGE: A NEVV BOOKE OF CARVING AND SEVVING. (a straight line) A small printers device. (a straight line) LONDON. Printed by M.F. for John Marriot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Churchyard in Fleetstreet. 1638.
8vo. 1 fep with ink inscription –“Mary Freeman her Book 1715” on front free end-paper, the same, but dated “1733” on verso. 3 Title pages. First title within double rule border. [1] 2nd x 1st title page [1]. 2 pages The Epistle Dedicatorie. 1-82. 2nd Title Page [1]. 85-148. 3rd Title Page [1]. 151-188. 13 pages of Tables [1]. 1 fep. Text in black letter script with woodcuts and typographical head-pieces and ornaments in-text. Front and back covers with no paste-downs. Showing original leather edging. Light age yellowing, margins of title page fractionally dusty, small section torn away from blank lower margin of M4 with loss of signature letter, minuscule wormhole in upper margin, occasional marginal thumb mark. Crisp and clean in contemporary dark brown calf, covers bordered with triple blind rule, ink stain to upper cover, spine ends worn. A very good unsophisticated copy.
- This fifth edition is probably the original second edition with new editions of this hugely important and fascinating cookery book. One of only a handful of surviving copies of any of the early editions, and one of the first cookbooks to establish cookery as a fashion, rather than simply a practical guide to running a kitchen/household. The work is divided into three parts, each with its own title page, the first two on new recipes for cooking, and the third “a New Booke of Carving and Sewing”(The medieval translation for sewing is serving). The prefaces, and its dedications, are to Mrs Martha Hayes in the first book and to Lady Browne in the second. The Author disparages previous cookery books “the most of which nevertheless have instructed rather how to marre than to make good Meate”. Murrell’s work was new, in that it established a new spirit of cookery and promises it is set forth in the English and French Fashion . He openly appeals to “London Cookery” rather than to provincial cookery. Murrell included many recipes he brought back from his experience of the new cuisine emerging in France. Unfortunately, the complete absence of any new French cookery books between 1560 and 1650 leaves a gap in our knowledge of the pre-La Varenne phase of development. In the third part of his book, Murrell also re-published sections of the first printed carving manual in English, “The Boke of Kervyne” of 1513. Though he reclaims carving as a task suitable for wives in aspiring ‘gentle’ households, he groups it with what he declares to be the most current and chic methods of cooking. In some ways Murrell’s use of this older carving manual seems a nostalgic throwback to an older style of hospitality, which he compares both negatively and positively to the new French methods. Despite its disdain for tradition, Murrell’s work includes many of the classics of British and French cooking recognizable today, including such things as rice pudding (though his recipe calls for the inclusion of ‘the smallest guts of a hog’). It also includes recipes using new world produce such as Turkey. Murrell's 'Book of Cookerie' is particularly rare in any edition; Only a handful of copies are known. STC 18303 recording only 3 copies in the UK and Folger and Library of Congress in the US. The first edition is known only by a sub-title at the Bodlein and the New York Public Library copy. No other edition is recorded. Bitting 336. Hull, ‘Chaste, Silent and Obedient.’ pp. 43-4, 187-88. Not in Vicaire, Oberle, or Alden.L1353. Scarce indeed!

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11236

Napier.   Alexander    
A Noble Boke Off Cookry
FFOR A PRYNCE HOUSSOLDE OR ENY OTHER ESTATELY HOUSSOLDE. REPRINTED VERBATIM FROM A RARE MS. IN THE HOLKHAM COLLECTION EDITED BY MRS. ALEXANDER NAPIER. LONDON: ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. 1882.
4to. Half title. Title Page. (v-xiii) (1-136) 3fep. Nicely bound in half tan calf with marbled boards. Plain spine with red label with gilt lines and lettering. Excellent condition externally and internally with minimal staining. Printed on large paper with wide margins and uncut edges. There is a very light round red library stamp (about the size of a 5p piece) on the Title page, but not affecting the text.
- This very nice book is transcribed from a manuscript in the Holkham Collection and is dated; circa 1467. Those recipes, in turn, closely resemble recipes in another famous cookery manuscript called the 'Forme of Cury' compiled about 1390. There is also on p.3. a printing of an aquatint engraving of the 'Peacock Feast' On Nov. 8th 1791, a bookseller was sued by the engraver of the 'Peacock Feast' for pirating the plate without permission. That aquatint plate was used to embellish a book called 'Antiquitates Culinaria' also about very old cookery manuscripts recording ancient Kingly Feasts. The original etching was done from a representation of a Saxon Feast on an ancient brass in St Margaret's Church, King's Lyn. It is also nice to find it as a head-piece, on p3. of this copy. On p.134, this book has an interesting glossary of obsolete medieval culinary words to be found in the 'Noble Boke of Cookery. A fascinating glimpse of English gastronomic history.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10925

Nott.   John     - With the bookplate of 'Steuart of Allanton' one of the oldest Scottish families
The Cook and Confectioner DICTIONARY:
Or, the Accomplish’d Housewife’s Companion. CONTAINING, 1. The Choicest Receipts in all the several Branches of Cookery; or the best and newest Ways of dressing all sorts of Flesh, Fish, Fowl, &c. for a Common or Noble Table; with their proper Garniture and Sauces. 11. The best way of making Bisks, Farces, forc’d Meats, Marinades, Olio’s Puptons, Ragoos, Sauces, Soops, Potages, &c. according to the English, French and Italian Courts. 111. All manner of Pastry-workss, as Biskets, Cakes, Cheese-cakes, Custards, Pastes, Patties, Puddings, Pyes, Tarts, &c. 1V. The various Branches of Confectionary; as Candying, Conserving, Preserving, and Drying all sorts of Flowers, Fruits, Roots, &c. Also Jellies, Composts, Marmalades, and Sugar-works. V. The way of making all English potable Liquors; Ale, Beer, Cider, Mead, Metheglin, Mum, Perry, and all sorts of Eng-lish Wines; Also Cordials, and Beautifying Waters. V1. Directions for ordering an Entertainment, or Bills of Fare for all Seasons of the Year; and setting out a Desert of Sweeet-meats to the best Advantage: With an Explanation of the Terms us’d in Carving. According to the Practice of the most celebrated Cooks, Confectioners, &c. in the Courts of England, France, c. and many private and accomplish’d House-wives. The Second Edition with Additions. Revised and Recommended By John Nott, late Cook the Dukes of Somerset, Ormond and Bolton; Lord Landsdown and Ashburnham. LONDON: Printed H.P. for C. Rivington, at the Bible and Crown, in St. Paul’s Church-yard. 1724. [Price six Shillings.]
8vo. 2feps. [1] Frontis-piece by J.Pine. Title page in red and black type. [1] 4p Introduction with printers device at the top. 2p Divertisements in Cookery. No page numbers but by the Alphabet 1+AL-YO. 14p Bills of Fare and Terms for Carving and setting out Dessert. 17p Index. 1p Advertisements. 2feps. Beautiful original two-tone dark tan boards with a modern dark calf spine with rasied bands and blind tooling. With a dark tan label and gilt lettering. A nice tightly bound and clean copy.
- John Nott, Cook to his Grace the Duke of Bolton strikes one in no small measure as being quite eccentric, at least on paper. In his book, the dedication is addressed to ‘all good housewives’ and starts ‘Worthy Dames----‘ He carries on, ‘-----it is unfashionable for a Book to come abroad without an Introduction, as for a Man to appear at Church with-out a Neckcloth, or a Lady without a Hoop-petticoat----‘ further on he states, ‘----of which I am satisfied you are already very sensible, or extol my own Performance; however, I flatter myself it will not, to you, be unacceptable----‘ he further addresses the Ladies, ‘---I have not troubled you with Fucus’s and Paints, for the putting of false Faces upon Nature, because you, my Country Women, for the Generality of you (as is allow’d even by all ingenious Foreigners) stand less in need of artificial Faces (your natural ones being more amiable) than those of your Sex in neighbouring Nations, with all their Paintings and Daubings;-----‘ Nott un-does his own efforts near the end of the dedication by proclaiming, ‘---And, indeed, great Pity were it if this Beneficence of Providence should be marr’d in the ordering, so as justly to merit the Reflection of the old Proverb, that though “God sends us Meat, yet the Devil does Cooks”------.’ I am sure that if English and also foreign Housewifes, as potential customers, had read the Dedication before buying it, the sales of Nott’s book would have taken a severe dip. However in saying all of the above, it is after all, extremely scarce, interesting and well laid out. There are very few copies that come up for sale at auction, bookfairs, in antiquarian bookshops or dealers catalogues.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11037

NUTT.   Frederick     - A superlatively rare find
Signed Hand Written Manuscript Recipe Book -- circa 1789.
The manuscript is in 5 approximately even sections with one fifth of the total pages blank: 1st section -- 214 numbered receipts with an index. 2nd section -- 59 numbered receipts with an index. 3rd section -- 9 pages of English spelling & shorthand studies. 4th section -- 69 pages of unnumbered receipts; mainly sweets, wines, cordials and pickles. No index. Frederick Nutt’s signature is on the very first page and in the 2nd section, above recipe # 42, for Currant Jelly. There is a date in the 4th section of June 10th 1826. The first section is almost the same as the 1st printed edition of Nutt’s 'Complete Confectioner' of 1789; It is almost identical in recipe sequence, recipe content and index. Out of 237 recipes in the 1st edition, there are only 44 recipes out of sequence in the manuscript. Most of the 44 recipes can be found in the 2nd section of the manuscript. The 2 biggest anomalies in the 1st section index are - # 1 -- the block of 6 ‘Cordials’ starting with recipe # 182. They are not asked for in the index of ‘The Complete Confectioner’. Anomaly # 2 – in ‘The Complete Confectioner’ there are 7 recipes in the chapter ‘Fruits Preserved in Brandy’ (recipe # 180) -- that are not in the 1st section of the manuscript, but scattered in the 2nd section. This is without doubt, Frederick Nutt’s own manuscript recipe book -- circa 1789, which he used to publish the 1st edition of his 'Complete Confectioner'.
16mo The manuscript measures 3 3/4" x 6 1/4". The book is dis-bound with back board present. The text block is tight. There are a couple of pages loose. All pages age browned. The text is small, neat, legible and in Nutt's handwriting throughout. Preserved in a brown cloth covered hand tied, folding sleeve. All held in a fine modern full tan calf clamshell box. Raised bands on spine with gilt lines and blind tooling in the compartments. 2 labels - one red, one green with gilt lettering. The boards edged with gilt lines.
- Although Frederick Nutt did not add his name to his famous book, 'The Complete Confectioner', it is understood that it was out of respect for another famous confectioner, Domenico Negri, at the 'Pot and Pineapple' shop in Berkley Square, where Nutt had been formally apprenticed. This probably means that many of the recipes contained in this manuscript and 'The Complete Confectioner' are from the 'Pot and Pineapple' as well as his later places of employment. All conscientious apprentices would keep a journal of all recipes seen and done, as they went about learning their trade. As can be seen in this detailed manuscript, in this respect Nutt was no exception, giving one a sense of a very diligent craftsman. One aspect of the manuscript that it is quite startling is how little editing happened between the manuscript (see the detailed description of this item above) and the published first edition of 'The Complete Confectioner'. Compared to today's multi-faceted approach and effort needed to get a successful cookery book onto the market, the manuscript and the subsequent book, surprise and amaze by their simplicity.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10908

NUTT.   Frederick     - The very rare first edition.
The Complete Confectioner
The COMPLETE CONFECTIONER; or the Whole ART of CONFECTIONARY: Forming a Ready Assistant to all Genteel FAMILIES; giving them a PERFECT KNOWLEDGE of CONFECTIONARY: with INSTRUCTIONS, NEATLY ENGRAVED ON TEN COPPER-PLATES, How to decorate a TABLE with TASTE and ELEGANCE, Without the Expence or Assistance of a Confectioner. By a Person, Late an Apprentice to the well known Messrs. Negri and Witten, of Berkley Square. London: Printed for the Author; and sold by J. Mathews, No. 18, Strand, MDCCLXXXIX. Price 10s 6d. neatly bound. Entered at Stationers Hall. (Nutt's name did not appear on the title page until the 3rd edition of 1806)
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. Pp. Half title. Title page [v-xxiv] [1] 2-212 Illustrations: Ten engraved plates, three folding, nine of table settings and one - a pastry moulding tool. (Plates 2&3 bound in back to front) A very clean copy with minimal stains. Fully bound in dark brown calf, rebacked, raised bands with blind tooling , red label with gilt lettering. Contemporary boards slightly bumped with nice polished patina. A rare item.
- Although Nutt did not add his name to the 'Complete Confectioner', it is understood that it was out of respect for another famous confectioner, Domenico Negri, at the 'Pot and Pneapple' shop in Berkley Square, where Nutt had been formally apprenticed. This probably means that many of the recipes contained in the Complete Confectioner are from the 'Pot and Pineapple' as well as his other places of employment. All conscientious apprentices would keep a journal of all recipes seen and done, as they went about learning their trade. This can be seen in the original Frederick Nutt manuscript this compiler has in his collection. Approximately a total of a third of the recipes in the manuscript match all the recipes in this first edition. The eminent cookery book dealer, Janet Clarke, informs us in her catalogue online, a very interesting little snippet about Nutt the professional confectioner and his book. To quote; "The author was obviously highly proficient in his art and his recipes are meticulous and was, at one time, offered £1000 to withdraw his work from the public in order to protect his fellow confectioners who were fearful of losing business to those who might rival them having learned their art through this work". He obviously declined the offer. One wonders in what regard Nutt's fellow professionals held him after that.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10909

Nutt.   Frederick     - an untrimmed copy.
THE IMPERIAL AND ROYAL COOK;
CONSISTING OF THE MOST SUMPTUOUS MADE DISHES, RAGOUTS, FRICASSES, SOUPS, GRAVIES,&c. Foreign and English: INCLUDING THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS IN FASHIONABLE LIFE. SECOND EDITION. BY FREDERICK NUTT. AUTHOR OF THE COMPLETE CONFECTIONER. LONDON; PRINTED FOR SAMUEL LEIGH, STRAND; AND BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY, PATERNOSTER ROW. 1819
8vo 195x120mm. 1fep. Half title. [2] Frontispiece with signature 'Frederic Nutt Esq.' Engraved by Woodman from a Drawing by Satchell. Title Page. (1)vi-viii Advertisements. (1)x-xxiv Contents. (1)2-268. (1)270-276 Index. 1fep. Original cardboard boards with advertisements on both sides. Lightly age browned but still very clearly legible. Rebacked with 1/4 dark brown modern calf with raised bands with fine gilt tooling. Two labels, one red and one black with gilt lettering. Internally very clean with original untrimmed edges. A very good copy.
- The original advertisements on the front cover gives all the information for this book. Two interesting points; It states this is the second edition but the date on the cover is 1820, while on the title page it states 1819. The back cover is a full advert for Nutt's other famous book 'The Complete Confectioner' also dated 1820. The first edition for this book is 1809 and the first edition of 'The Complete Confectioner' is 1789. Also of interest, Nutt has his first name on the front cover spelt Frederic, and on the back as Frederick. Bitting has this second of 1819, Oxford the first of 1809, Cagle the first also, and the BL one of each. A very scarce book especially untrimmed and with the original boards.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11026

Parnell.   Henry     - Rare.
A Collection of Valuable Receipts.
IN VARIOUS BRANCHES OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY, SELECTED FROM THE WORKS OF BRITISH AND FOREIGN WRITERS OF UNQUESTIONABLE AUTHORITY AND EXPERIENCE. BY HENRY PARNELL, OF LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS. London: WILLIAM DARTON, JUN. 58, HOLBORN HILL. Sold by the Booksellers in Town and Country. 1819.
FIRST and possible SOLE EDITION. 174mm x 105mm. 2feps. [1] Frontispiece dated 1822. [1] (1)4-72. 2feps. Original discoloured dark grey covers with rubbed corners. Quarter red cloth. Spine with black label lengthways with gilt lettering. Pages slightly age browned throughout with the frontis and title page a little more. Overall fine.
- There are no copies in the bibliographies nor auction catalogues. Nothing can be found out about Henry Parnell. There is no further information in the book besides that on the title page. The frontis dated 1822 added to the title page dated 1819 is a further curiosity that defies an explanation. It is a curious book with general and diverse receipts, such as 'To detect Dampness in a Bed', or 'Experienced Method of Catching Larks' also 'Method of recovering persons Apparently Drowned'. Incredibly the recipe for “British Champagne” comes after advice on 'How to destroy worms in a gravel path'. COPAC shows only two copies at Oxford, both dated 1819 and one other in the BL dated 1819 with the frontis also dated 1822. A rare item even without proof of other possible editions.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11185

Partridge.   John     - Extremely rare.
THE TREASURY OF Hidden Secrets,
Commonly called, The Good-huswives Closet of provision, for the health of her Household. Gathered out of sundry experiments, lately practised by men of great knowledge: And now newly inlarged with divers necessary Physick helps, and knowledge of the names and disposition of diseases, that most commonly happen to Men and Women. Not imeprtinant for every good Huswife to us ein her House, amongst her own Family. [Printers woodcut device] LONDON, Printed by Jane Bell, and to be sold at the East-end of Christ-Church, 1653.
Quarto, A-I in 4's. 1fep. Title page. [1] A2 - FINIS. [Total pp 63] 3p The Table. 1fep. Original full dark brown calf. Blind tooled border line to boards. Spine with gilt lines and lettering re-laid. Pages are age browned with browning to edges. Text in black letter. Top of one leaf restored without loss. A good copy of an extremely rare book.
- John Partridge was an Elizabethan author of historical poem-romance. The earthy, mundane cookbook was an unusual transgression from the norm. His book, the ‘Treasury of Hidden Secrets’ was a popular 16th and early 17th century English handbook of cookery, herbals, and medicine. First published around 1573, it was printed in London by Richard Jones, and gives John Partridge as the author. It was frequently reprinted for over 75 years; the present volume is that of the 1653 edition printed by Jane Bell. The earliest extant copy of the book is the 1573 edition. Its title was ‘The Treasurie of Commodious Conceits & Hidden Secrets’, reprinted in 1584, again by Jones, the title-page advertised it as 'now the fourth time corrected, and inlarged,' The Elizabethan printer might have been exclusively a printer, or both bookseller and printer; but booksellers were not necessarily printers. Both printers and booksellers in London were tightly controlled, licensed, censored, and fined for violations. Some copies note that Jones’s 1584 printing was 'at Eliot’s Court Press for Henry Car,' suggesting Car as a bookseller who helped to finance the printing. When the book was reprinted in 1591, Richard Jones is now located specifically ‘at the Rose and Crowne neere Holborne bridge.’ The Bodleian’s bibliographic record suggests J. Charlewood as the 1591 printer. Jones is again given as printer for the 1596 edition. The book was again reprinted in 1608. This seems to be the latest date that the name John Partridge occurs in the text; subsequent editions are published anonymously. The next reprint was in 1627, from a new bookseller and printer; the book was ‘Printed [by Eliot’s Court Press] for E.B[rewster] and R.B[yrd], and are to be sold at the ‘signe of the Bible in Cheapside.’ By 1627 the phrase, ‘Commodious Conceits’ had dropped out of the title and the title page identifies it as ‘The Treasurie of Hidden Secrets.’ In 1633 it was first printed by a woman ‘Elizabeth All-de dwelling neere Christs-church.’ Elizabeth was the widow of Edward All-de, a typical London printer whose father, John, was also a printer and whose work and style is well known. In 1637 ‘Treasury’ was ‘printed by Richard Oulton, dwelling neere Christs-church.’ As McKerrow (genealogy resources) suggest that Allde died in 1628, Richard Oulton may have taken over the press from his widow by 1637. Finally, ‘Treasury’ was last reprinted in 1653 'by Jane Bell and to be sold at the East end of Christ-church.' Originals of the 1573 printing are held by the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Henry E. Huntington Library. The only other work attributed to John Partridge is the cookery-medicine book called ‘The Widowes Treasure'. Partridge borrowed from a friend a copy of a household book written for the private use of ‘a gentlewoman in the country’, and decided it was his duty to publish it in 1585 under the title, 'The Widowes Treasure'. Copies of both Partridge's books are extremely rare, with none at auction since 1926. The BL only locates two other copies of the 1653 edition of ‘Treasury of Hidden Secrets’, one in the UK, and one in the US.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11023