Reynolds.   M. A.    
THE COMPLETE ART OF COOKERY,
EXHIBITED IN A PLAIN AND EASY MANNER, WITH DIRECTIONS FOR MARKETING; THE SEASONS FOR MEAT, POULTRY, FISH, GAME, ETC. BY M.A. REYNOLDS. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY NEWMAN & CO. MDCCCL. Surrounded by an ornate border of leaves.
FIRST EDITION 1850. 130x82 mm. 1fep. Half Title. [2] Frontispiece with a double line border. Title page. [1] (1)viii-xx Contents. (1)22-242 with many etchings in the text. 243-256 Bills of Fare. Last page at the end – J.S. Pratt, Printer, Stokesley, Yorkshire. 1fep. Untrimmed text block. Original brown cloth covers, blinds stamped. Spine scuffed at each end. Very clean internally. A nice copy in the original state.
- After much research, information about this title and author cannot be found. Not showing in any of the bibliographies. COPAC also showing no copies. Researching online for the printer J.S. Pratt of Stokesley, Yorkshire, the following interesting data was found; The Pratt, Stokesley printing collection, was formerly the property of D W Richardson. It was housed at Stokesley library from 1978, but has now been moved to Northallerton library. The collection consists of about 200 items, mostly books, printed in Stokesley during the mid to late nineteenth century. The bulk of the collection was printed by J S Pratt, but other printers such as W F Pratt, Tweddell and Sons and W Braithwaite also feature. In conclusion one must attribute rarity to this little tome.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11226

Rose.   Giles     - Complete copy of one of the rarest cookery books
A perfect School of INSTRUCTIONS For the Officers of the Mouth:
SHEWING The Whole ART of A Master of the Household, A Master Carver, A Master Butler, A Master Confectioner, A Master Cook, A Master Pastryman. Being a Work of singular Use for Ladies and Gentlewomen, and all Persons whatsoever that are desirous to be acquainted with the most Excellent ARTS of Carving, Cookery, Pastry, Preserving, and Laying a Cloth for Grand Entertainments. The like never before extant in any Language. Adorned with Pictures curiously Ingraven, displaying the whole Arts. By Giles Rose one of the Master Cooks in His Majesties Kitchen. LONDON, Printed for R. Bentley and M. Magnes, in Russel-street in Covent Garden, 1682.
FIRST and SOLE ENGLISH EDITION. 12mo. 2fep. Title Page with single line border. 8pp The Dedication. 10pp To the Reader. 4pp The Contents. 1-563 [1] 2fep. Forty two woodcut illustrations (most of which are full page) in the text. Internally very clean with no browning or foxing. Contemporary dark brown calf with double blind-fillet around the sides. Red morocco label with gilt lettering. Raised bands and overall, a nice patina. An exceptional rarity.
- The rare English edition of 'L'Ecole Parfaite des Officers de Bouche' first edition - 1662. One of the most important and popular titles of 17th century French Gastronomy. This English edition comprises of the six original books, (and not five as is sometimes supposed) 'Le Maistre de Hostel; or, Steward of a Family; 'Le grand Escuyer tranchant; or, The Great Master Carver; 'Le Sommelier Royal; or, The Royal Butler; 'Le Confiturier Royal; or, The Royal Confectioner; 'Le Cuisinier Royal; or, The Royal French Master Cook; and 'Le Pastissier Royal; or, The Royal Pastry Cook'. Including numerous, remarkable and primitive woodcuts depict table settings and various carving methods, including more than fifty ways of carving fruit. An interesting aside is that the engraved plates mirror (especially the fruit carvings) the very rare treatise on the art of carving by Jacques Vontet's - 'L'art de Trancher la Viande et Toutes Sortes des Fruits' [circa Lyon 1647]. Oxford states "It seems an excellent book, although it contains some strange things: 'Wine for the Gods', 'Sauce d'Enfer', 'Sheeps Feet for an Afternoon drinking" There are directions for folding napkins. There are dozens of ways of cooking eggs -- 'Eggs a l'Intrigue', 'Eggs a la Negligence', etc - and dozens of different pies and tarts, including 'a tart of frogs', 'a tart made with tortoise' and Sausages made from the Brain of a Capon'. Simon Gough states with insight in one of his wonderfully eccentric catalogues 'Food for Thought' -- "it is curious how few great collections of cookery books contain this volume". By way of an answer, he further proclaims, -- "It is one of the rarest cookery books in the English language" In past years at auction, there are no copies in any of the great cookery book collections of Schraemli, Westbury, Simon, Lambert, Crahan, Wretman, Marks. There was an incomplete copy from Simon Hall's collection, sold at the Dominic Winter Book Auctions in 2005. In the 80's Simon Gough had the complete 'Lister' copy for sale in his 47th catalogue. The Lister copy came up again at auction in the Cetus Library sale at Bloomsbury Books on Sept. 22nd 2011, proving just how very few there are in circulation. No more than three recorded; with one of them incomplete. OCLC indicates eight copies only; Bitting p. 407; Cagle 970; Wing R1933.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10959

Rundell.   Mrs     - A rare second edition - 1st issue.
A NEW SYSTEM OF DOMESTIC COOKERY;
FORMED UPON PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMY. And adapted to the Use of PRIVATE FAMILIES. BY A LADY. A NEW EDITION, CORRECTED. LONDON: PRINTED FOR JOHN MURRAY, FLEET-STREET; J.HARDING, ST.JAMES'S-STREET; AND A.CONSTABLE AND CO. EDINBURGH; At the Union Printing-Office, St.John's Square, by W.Wilson. 1807. Price Seven Shillings and Sixpence.
Small 12mo. 2nd edition - 1st issue. (The second issue has considerably more pages) 2feps. [1] Frontispiece. Title page. [1] (Entered at Stationers Hall) 1p Advertisement. 1p Directions to Binder. p18 Contents. 1-xxx Miscellaneous Observations with seven plates of carving meats. 1+2-323. [1] 1+326-351. 3p Advertisements. 2feps. Half crushed dark tan calf spine and corners with marbled boards. Spine with raised bands, gilt tooling and lettering. Original uncut paper edges. Internally, slightly dusty but overall very clean. A very nice copy.
- Maria Rundell was the original ‘domestic goddess.’ An elderly Edinburgh widow whose best-selling book on cookery, medicinal remedies and household management defined the perfect home. ‘A New System of Domestic Cookery’ was a publishing sensation in the early 1800s. It sold half a million copies and conquered America, and its profits helped found one of the Victorian era's most influential Edinburgh based publishing empires, one which boasted Lord Byron, Charles Darwin, Sir Walter Scott, Jane Austen, Benjamin Disraeli and Arthur Conan Doyle among its authors. Nearly 180 years after her death, the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh holds one of the most significant single collections of papers on 19th century literature. The ‘John Murray Archive’ compiled by the seven generations of Murrays, was recently bought by the library, for the staggering sum of £31,000,000, chiefly with lottery money. It includes 150,000 pages of letters, manuscripts and documents from some of the most significant thinkers, scientists and writers of modern history. Scholars have largely ignored Mrs Rundell, a friend of the Murrays and the widow of a surgeon from Bath, and overlooked her remarkable role in the company's success - a success soured by a bitter feud. In 1805, aged 61, she had sent the second John Murray, the son of the Scottish printer who set up a small publishers in London in 1768, an unedited collection of recipes, remedies and advice on running a home. She had compiled it originally for her seven daughters, and offered it to Murray free of charge. Murray recognised its potential. It was some 60 years since the first English cookery book had been written by Hannah Glasse, and Mrs Rundell's 'New System of Domestic Cookery, Formed upon Principles of Economy and Adapted to the Use of Private Families by a Lady', was about to become the bible for Britain's 19th century bourgeoisie. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography describes it as "the earliest manual of household management with any pretensions to completeness, it called forth many imitations". Stored in a double-locked 'cage' in the library's vault, Murray’s firm's 'subscriptions book' for November 21 1805 reveals advance sales of 310 copies. In July 1807 booksellers placed advance orders for 1,150 copies for this edition. By 1841 it had run to 65 British editions, selling 10,000 copies a year. It was snapped up in Britain's colony, America, where it was retitled "American Domestic Cookery and The Experienced American Housekeeper" and there ran to 37 editions, and was translated into German. It sold more than 245,000 copies in the UK, remaining in print until the 1880s. Its profits enabled Murray to buy one of the most famous addresses in literature - 50 Albemarle Street, Mayfair. Doubling up as the publisher's offices and home, Albemarle Street's drawing room became the location for some of the most influential gatherings in 19th century English literature. Murray's guests would include Isaac Disraeli, father of the future Prime Minister, George Canning, a Foreign Secretary and briefly Prime Minister, Sir Walter Scott and Lord Byron. The poet was one of Murray's biggest signings. The archive reveals that Mrs Rundell and her publisher soon fell out. In 1807, the year of this edition on offer, the author wrote angry letters about errors in the new edition. She said: "I am hourly struggling against my feelings, but they are grievously wounded." It had been "miserably prepared". Corrected editions soon appeared, but by 1814 their relationship had collapsed. Convinced Murray was neglecting her book, she offered a revised version to a rival, Longmans. They issued injunctions against each other. Mrs Rundell prevented Murray from republishing the book after his rights expired. Murray blocked her rival version, rightly claiming he had improved and "embellished" the book. Their battle ended in 1821, when the Lord Chancellor cancelled both injunctions and asked them to settle privately. In February 1823 a legal agreement records that Murray paid her "the sum of two thousand and one hundred pounds of good and lawful money". Later, Mrs Rundell moved to Lausanne, Switzerland, where she died in 1828, aged 83. It was only then that her authorship was revealed. Online, at auction, in dealer’s catalogues and in book shops, later editions by Rundell are numerous and very common. We are informed erroneously in some bibliographies, that this 1807 copy is the rare first edition. In fact the first was published 1805/1806 in a very small number. This copy is the equally scarce second edition, of which only a little over a thousand copies were published. This is an exceptionally clean, untrimmed copy; A real collectors item.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11042

Sala.   George Augustus     - With a brief note signed by G.A. Sala
The Thorough Good Cook
A SERIES OF NOTES ON THE CULINARY ART AND NINE HUNDRED RECIPES BY GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA. CASSELL AND COMPANY, Limited LONDON, PARIS & MELBOURNE 1895 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
FIRST AND SOLE ENGLISH EDITION. 210x172mm. Paste-down and fep in designed paper. On verso of fep: a tipped-in note on Reform Club embossed paper stating "Reform Club: Thursday. Dr Sir a line to say that I shall be duly with you a little before 8. Faithfully Yours G.A. Sala. (underlined) The Rev. T. Shore." Half Title. Verso advertisement for Sala's books. Title Page. Verso with a small illustrated device titled 'Belle Sauvage'. (1)vi-viii Preface 1. (1)x-xiii Preface 11. (1)xv-xvii Preface 111. 2p Contents. [1] (1)2-467. [1] (1)470-492 Index. Fep and paste-down in designed paper. The fine tooled and embossed original cover with gilt still in very good condition but the spine and the back edge of covers are sunned. All edges gilt. Internally very clean and in very good condition. An uncommon book especially with the autographed note.
- George Augustus Sala, (see 1st photo below) the youngest son of Augustus Sala (1792-1828) and Henrietta Simon (1789-1860), was born on 24th November, 1828. After the death of his father, George's mother supported herself and five surviving children by teaching singing and giving annual concerts in London and Brighton. Educated at the Pestalozzian school at Turnham Green, Sala left at fifteen to become a clerk. Later he found work drawing railway plans during the Railway Mania of 1845. A talented artist, Sala also worked as a scene-painter at the Lyceum Theatre and in 1848 was commissioned to illustrate Albert Smith's 'The Man in the Moon'. This was followed by an illustrated guidebook for foreign tourists that was published by Rudolf Ackermann. Other work included prints of the Great Exhibition and the funeral of the Duke of Wellington. Sala was also interested in becoming a journalist and in 1851 Charles Dickens accepted his article, 'The Key of the Street', for his journal, 'Household Words'. This was the first of many of Sala's articles that Dickens published over the next few years. In April, 1856, Dickens sent Sala to Russia as the journal's special correspondent. He also contributed to the author's next venture, 'All the Year Round' and other journals such as the 'London Illustrated News', 'Punch Magazine' and 'Cornhill Magazine'. In 1857, Sala began writing for the 'Daily Telegraph'. For the next twenty-five years he contributed an average of ten articles a week. Although paid £2,000 a year for his work, Sala, who was an avid collector of rare books and expensive china, was always in debt. Sala loved traveling and in 1863 accepted the offer of becoming the Telegraph's foreign correspondent. Over the next few years he reported on wars and uprisings all over the world. During the Franco-German War he was arrested in Paris as a spy but was eventually released from prison. He wrote several books based on his travels including 'From Waterloo to the Peninsula' (1867), 'Rome and Venice' (1869), 'Paris' (1880), 'America Revisited' (1882), 'A Journey Due South' (1885) and 'Right Round the World' (1888). After leaving the Daily Telegraph Sala moved to Brighton where he attempted to start his own periodical, 'Sala's Journal'. The venture failed and left him deeply in debt and in early 1895 he was forced to sell his large library of 13,000 books. George Augustus Sala died at Brighton on 8th December, 1895. In an email I received from Linda Gifkins, she kindly informed me of a hitherto unknown edition of 'The Thorough Good Cook' printed by Brentano's - New York, Chicago, Paris, & Washington in 1896. Sala was twice married. His first wife, Harriet, whom he married in September 1859, died at Melbourne in December 1885. In 1891 he married a second wife, Bessie, third daughter of Robert Stannard, C.E., who survived him. Sala was a great friend of Alexis Soyer and was a member of the Reform Club whilst Soyer was the Chef de Cuisine there.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11144

Salmon.   William     - The very scarce first edition of 1695.
The Family Dictionary; or Houshold Companion:
Wherein Alphabetically laid down Exact Rules and ChoicePhysical RECEIPTS FOR The Preservation of Health, Prevention of Sickness, and Curing the several Diseases, Distempers, and Grievences, incident to Men, Women, and Children. Also, Directions for Making Oils, Ointements, Salves, Cordial-Waters, Powders, Pills, Bolus's, Lozenges, Chymical Pre-parations, Physical-Wines, Ales, and other Liquors, &c. and Descriptions of the Virtues of Herbs, Fruits, Flowers, Seeds, Roots, Barks, Minerals, and Parts of Living Crea-tures, Used in Medicinal Potions, &c. Likewise, Directions for Cookery, in Dressing Flesh, Fish, Fowl, Seasoning, Garnishing Sauces, and Serving-up in the Best and most acceptable Manner. The Whole ART of Patry, Conserving, Preserving, Candying, Confectionary &c. Also, The Way of Making all sorts of Perfumes, Beautifying-Waters, Pomatums, Washes, Sweet-Balls, Sweet-Bags, and Essences: Taking Spots, and Stains out of Garments, Lin-nen, &c. and Preserving them form Moths, &c. Wash-ing, or Brightning Tarnished Gold, or Silver Lace, Plate, &c. Together, With the Art of Making all sorts of English Mead, Metheglin, &c. And the ART of Fining, and Recovering Foul or Faded Wines. The MYSTERY of Pickling, and Keeping all Sorts of Pickles throughout the Year. To Which is Added, as an APPENDIX, The Explanation of Physical Terms, Bills of Fare in all Sea-sons of the Year. With the ART of CARVING. And many other Useful Matters. By J.H. London, Printed for W. Rhodes, at the Star, the Corner of Bride-Lane, in Fleetstreet, 1695.
FIRST EDITION. 12vo. 1fep. (missing first blank) Title page, slightly brittle at edges with no loss. On verso - Licensed, February the 28th 1695. 5p Preface. [1] AC-YO. (no page numbers, but complete.) 16p Appendix. 2fep. (one original) Pages uniformly age browned throughout. One page 'BL' has a 4" strip of the border with a very small loss of text. With modern full dark tan calf, with double fillets on the boards. Raised bands with blind tooled lines. With red label with gilt writing.
- Dr William Salmon, a noted Empiric, born 2nd of June 1644. According to an inscription under his portrait in ‘Ars Anatomica’, he studied and wrote a profusion of books on medicine, surgery, anatomy, pharmacology, astronomy, gardening, cookery, astrology, religion and translated several Latin medical classics into English. Salmon used the title of MD on his title pages, but according to Stanley H. Johnston, Jr., Curator of Rare Books at The Holden Arboretum, "most writers doubt that he was entitled to it. He still is somewhat difficult to assess since he is known to have amassed a 3,000 volume library containing many of the medical classics and produced several medical publications that were sufficiently erudite that his critics have claimed they were ghost-written for him." Rupert Halliwell at SimsReed Rare Books in London describes Salmon as a "learned man, with a taste for the obscure" and notes that his library, auctioned off after his death, "contained works in French, Greek, Latin and Hebrew, on medicine and other subjects." But his enemies asserted that his earliest education was from a charlatan with whom he travelled, and whose business he eventually inherited. And he seems ill-inclined to prove them wrong. He lived at a time long before hospitals had out-patient facilities. At this time "irregular practitioners" frequently lived near the gates of St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London. Their patients were those who could not or would not be admitted to the hospital. Salmon thus set up his stall near the Smithfield gate of St. Bartholomew's. It was there he "treated all diseases, sold special prescriptions of his own, as well as drugs in general, cast horoscopes, and professed alchemy," according to Norman Moore in his article about Salmon in the OUP's Dictionary of National Biography. Always game to write something different, in 1696, he published one of England's first cookery books. ‘The Family-Dictionary, or, Houshold Companion’. This volume is both a cookery book and a compendium of information for the home-maker, very much like the Household books of Isabella Beeton. It was meant to be the only household reference a housewife would need. Here is Salmon's very elegant recipe for Black-Pudding with no starch at all; To make this the best, and fare exceeding the common way. Boil the Umbles of a Hog tender, take some of the Lights [lungs] with the Heart, and all the Flesh about them, taking out the Sinews, and mincing the rest very small; do the like by the Liver: add grated Nutmeg, four or five Yolks of Eggs, a pint of Sweet Cream, a quarter of a pint of Canary [wine], Sugar, Cloves, Mace and Cinnamon finely powdered, a few Carraway-seeds, and a little Rose-water, a pretty quantity of Hog-fat, and some Salt: roul it up about two Hours before you put it into the Guts, then put it into them after you have rinsed them in Rose-water. The alphabetical format of Salmon's book is very strict so that the topic that immediately precedes ‘Black-Pudding’ is ‘Biting by a Snake, Adder, or Mad Dog.’ William Salmon’s name only appeared on the second edition, corrected and much enlarged of 1696 and with no mention of the J.H. on the title page of this copy. Oxford p45, cites the first of 1795; MacLean p128, the 4th of 1710 and a 4th with additions of 1734; Bitting p416, has the 1st and the 3rd of 1705. Cagle pp 706-707, cites the 1st and the 4th of 1710.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11021

Sandford.   Francis     - A magnificent copy.
Coronation of James II
THE HISTORY OF THE CORONATION Of the Most High, Most Mighty, and Most Excellent MONARCH, JAMES II. By the Grace of GOD, KING of England, Scotland, France and Ireland. DEFENDER OF THE FAITH &c. And of His Royal Consort QUEEN MARY: Solemnized in the Collegiate Church of St. PETER in the City of WESTMINSTER, on Thursday the 23 of April, being the Festival of St. George, in the Year of Our Lord 1685. With an Exact Account of the several Preparations in Order thereunto, Their MAJESTIES MOST Splendid Processions, and Their Royal and Magnificent FEAST in WESTMINSTER HALL. The Whole Work Illustrated with SCULPTURES. By HIS Majesties Especial Command. (With a large engraved vignette of the Royal Coat of Arms) By FRANCIS SANDFORD Esq; Lancaster Herald of Arms. In the Savoy: Printed by Thomas Newcomb, One of His Majesties Printers 1687.
Large Folio. 410x270mm. Marbled paste-down and endpaper. [2] 2fep with verso bearing name of 'Imprimatur'. Title Page in red and black text and engraved vignette finely rebacked. [1] 2p To the King. 1p James R. [1] 2p Preface. 2p Contents. 1-135. [1] 2feps. Back endpaper and paste-down marbled. Full polished calf, panelled elaborate gilt spine with raised bands, inner gilt fillets on the paste-down and gilt edges to the boards and pages. In all, 3 engraved vignettes and 31 engraved plates. That is 2 detailed plates of the Regalia, Ground plan of Westminster, ground plan of St. Peter, 2 views of the Cathedral of Westminster during the service, The Royal Couple after the in-thronization, ground plan of Westminster Hall showing the King and Queen's Dinner plan, inside of Westminster Hall showing the King and Queen at Dinner with the service of the first course of the Hot meal, Manner of Champions, with 2 extra plates of the magnificent Fireworks display on the Thames and the procession of William 11. These superb plates engraved by S.Moore, W.Sherwin, N.Yeates, Sturt and Collins. This copy is an early issue before some of the headpieces and initials were printed. Page 33 is present in two states, with and without the marginal engraving of five crowns. Lipperhide #2688 mentions only 28 plates with 2 reproductions. Ex-libris the Rev. William Bree, Rector of Allesley. A magnificent and desirable copy.
- Many a 'splendid occasion' in European history - coronation, royal wedding, funeral, beatification, embassy or triumphal entry - has been commemorated in an illustrated 'festival book.' Like a souvenir scrapbook, such volumes record memorable events down to their most fleeting aspects, eg; the food and the fireworks. Catholic Italy and France, eminent in opera and liturgy, were the chief producers of festival books. Even though England came late to the genre, 'The History of the Coronation of James II' is one of the most splendidly illustrated books of the seventeenth century. It served as a visual touchstone for subsequent coronations, almost inventing a tradition. British royal ceremonial is one of the few to survive intact, and it remains the most magnificent and brilliantly orchestrated. Here in thirty one double-page plates, drawn under the direction of the herald Francis Sandford, one may follow every detail of the procession and banqueting, from the discreet presence of the diarist Samuel Pepys, holding a pole of the canopy that shields the king, to the "1,445 dishes of the delicious viands" consumed that day. Henry Purcell, one of England's greatest composers, died in November 1695, and is buried in Westminster Abbey. At the time of the coronation of James II in 1685, Purcell was Keeper of the King's Instruments and Organist of the Chapel Royal. The introit ‘I Was Glad’ with its text taken from Psalm 122 was written by Purcell especially for the coronation. This is just one of the myriad of details that make the event so exceptionally well documented, thanks to Sandford’s book published two years after the Coronation. Of particular interest to the cookery book collector is the large chapter starting on p108 titled 'The Royal Feasts in Westminster Hall'. It contains a list of all 144 dishes placed on the table of the Peers and Peeresses. In all there is a breakdown of the placement of the total 1445 Dishes. There is also 2 beautiful plates of the table layout and the actual Dinner of the King and Queen. On p119, Patrick Lamb Esq, His Majesties Master-Cook (and author of "Royal Cookery' 1710) is mentioned for his part in the feast, and on p127, his payment of £50 is documented. Sandford's book was so well received and so admired that in many ways it set the standards for great British Royal occasions of the future. These traditions are singularly unique and unchanged even today. In a diverse and fast changing world the magnificence of these fantastic Royal occasions still attracts huge interest around the world. To view these traditional and colourful pageants on TV and to then read the book, one gets a true historical sense of the continuity of the British Monarchy.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11024

SAULNIER.   L.     - The very scarce first English edition - 1924.
LE REPERTOIRE DE LA CUISINE
Translated by E. BRUNET; Chef to the Duke of Roxburge. La bonne cuisine est la base du bonheur. A. ESCOFFIER. [an illustration of a young chef carrying a basket of fresh bread] 1st ENGLISH EDITION Coyrights 1914. On SALE LONDON: Maison ALLARD, 35a, Old Compton Street, W,1. PARIS: DUPONT & MALGAT, 40, Rue Coquilliere, 40. 1924.
190 x 130mm. 2feps. Half-title. [1] Title in red & black text. [1] Dedication to Auguste Escoffier. [1] vii Hors-d'Oeuvre a la Francaise. [1] ix-xi Preface. [1] xiii-xiv The Menu/The Wines. xv-xvi French Culinary Terms, page slightly trimmed without loss. xvii- xx The Index A-L. All the chapters have nice illustrations at the beginning and end. (1)2-236. 2feps. Internally very clean and tight. The original burgundy cardboard covers slightly rubbed on edges. With the spine expertly and sympathetically re-laid in burgundy cloth with black text. The front cover with the original indented black tooling and with a hairline crack not affecting anything. Their scarcity is attributed to the fact that many did not survive the harsh kitchen environment, the chefs greasy hands and being stored without thought. Most copies found are quite battered and worn. This copy is very good in the original state.
- The 'Repertoire de la Cuisine' was first published in France in 1914. It became, in France and the UK after being translated into English, the indispensable guide to the serious professional apprentice chef of classical cuisine. Louis Saulnier, a student of Auguste Escoffier, wrote this book (commonly called Le Répertoire) as a guide to his mentor's cooking and as a shorthand guide to 'Le Guide Culinaire' written and published by Escoffier 1903. The A-L index is based on the departments of a big classical kitchen brigade. A - Fundamental elements of cookery. B - Garnishes and Sauces. C - Hors-d'Oeuvre. D - Soups. E - Eggs. F - Fish. G - Entrees of Abats-Poultry and Game. H - Releves and Entrees of Butchers meat. I - Salads. J - Vegetables and Farinaceous Products. K - Sweets. L - Savouries. The complete list of all the French classical recipes in abbreviated form with no measurements nor quantities. Eg: The classic Sauce Chasseur - "Saute, swill with white wine, brandy, tomatoed half glace, add sliced mushrooms sauteed with chopped shallots, sprinkle with chopped parsley". To cook any recipe in the Repertoire requires a complete knowledge of all the classical terms, basic preparations and techniques. A fantastic culinary compendium that is equal to Escoffier's 'Aide Memoire'.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11205

Scappi   Bartolomeo     - Excedingly rare first edition, 1st issue. A Renaissance classic with stunning plates.
OPERA DI M. BARTOLOMEO SCAPPI
CVOCO SECRETO DI PAPA PIO QVINTO, DIVISA IN SEI LIBRI. Nel primo si contiene il ragionamento chef a l’ Autore con Gio.suo discepolo. Nel secondo si tratta di diverse viviande di carne, si di quadrupedi, come di volatili. Nel terzo si parla Flatura, e Flagione de pesci. Nel quarto si mostrano le liste del presentar le vivande in tavolo, cosi di grasso come di magro. Nel quinto si contiene l’ordine di far diverse forti paste, & altri lavor. Nel sefto, & altimo libro si ragiona de’convalescenti, & molte altre sorti di vivande per gli infermi. Con le discorso funerale che fu fatto nelle effequie di Papa Paulo 111. Con le figure chef anno bisogno nella cucina, & alli Reuerendissimi nel Conclave. [A square Tramezino printer's device showing a picture of Sibylla with large lettering around it]. QVAL PIV FERMO E IL MIO FOGLIO E IL MIO PRESAGGIO. Col priuilegio del summo Pontefice Papa Pio V. & dell’Illustrifs. Senato Veneto per anni XX.
FIRST EDITION – FIRST ISSUE. n/d 1570. Inside board and end paper with marbled paper. 1 fep. Title Page. [1] 2p PIVS PAPA V. 1p 1570.22.Martij in Rog. 1p Cosmos Medices. 2p ALL’ILLVESTRE, ET MOLTO REVER. SIG. 1p A I LETTORI. [2] Frontispiece Illustrated portrait of Scappi. 1-12(1) RAGIONAMENTO CHE L’AVTORE. 13(1)TAVOLA DEL PROMO LIBRO. 14-369 leaves, as unusually the recto and verso of each leaf count as one page.(1). (This also includes a section of curious pagination between a second page, numbered 123 and titled Libro Quatro Delle Liste, to page 141. There is a first correct page 123 before the mis-pagination. This anomaly is present in other 1st editions, with correct foliation, and no text loss). 6p TAVOLA. 8p HAVENDO. 27 Engraved Plates (one double page) [1] 1 fep. Inside board and end paper with marbled paper. Bound nicely in a full dark brown sheepskin. Spine with two tone black raised bands and dark brown compartments all with fine blind tooling, and a dark red label with text in gilt. The finely blind tooled dark brown boards are two tone, with black centre compartments and with finely tooled edges. The title page and the illustrated plates are very slightly age browned. The whole text-block in very good condition with edges coloured green. In excellent overall condition.
- The best known earliest printed Renaissance cookery books start in 1475 with Bartolomeo Sacchi's - Platina, De Honesta Voluptate et Valetudine. Next came the oldest cookery text, believed to have been compiled in the late 4th or early 5th century AD and called Apicius - De re Coquinaria, and first printed in January 1498. Followed by Cristoforo di Messisbugo's - Di Bhanchetti, which was published posthumously in 1549. This first edition of Scappi’s Opera, (meaning Work) was printed 21 years later in 1570 and memorably eulogised by Anne Willan - “Bartolomeo Scappi is to cooking as Michelangelo is to fine arts; in its beauty as a printed work, in its ordered presentation and comprehensiveness, his cookbook ‘Opera’ exemplifies the practical elegance of the High Renaissance.” - As Willan alludes to, no other book has matched ‘Opera’ for its twenty seven handsome and scrupulously accurate drawings, depicting the ideal renaissance kitchen setup with all the equipment of the expert cook. This is the first issue of two editions of 1570, undated and with 369 pages rather than the 444 numbered leaves of the dated second issue. Harvard Catalogue gives the first issue priority. Due to differences between settings, there is a suggestion the undated issue may have been printed by Maurice Tramezino’s brother Francesco, in Rome. This bears out because Scappi was in service in Rome and the plates and some initials were made and transferred from Venice and then back for Maurice’s dated edition which was also set from manuscript. It was Pope Pius V who personally gave the Tramezino brothers the privilege on March 29th 1570 to print Scappi’s book. Reprints of ‘Opera’ were continually published till 1643. Bartolomeo Scappi, born c.1500 whose origins have been discovered due to fairly recent research, came from the town of Dumenza in Lombardy, with an inscription on a stone plaque inside the church of Luino. Prior to this, the first known fact of his life was in April 1536, when he cooked a dinner afforded by Cardinal Lorenzo Campeggio for the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. Already Scappi at thirty six years old is serving exalted guests. He served as a cook to several other cardinals after that, and then started to serve Pope Pius IV in the Vatican papal kitchen. He continued work in the service of Pope Pius V as his ‘cuoco secreto’ – private cook. Pius V himself, described Scappi as ‘peritissimus Magister’ (a most skilled Master). Indeed he was. Great thanks must be conveyed to Terence Scully who wrote and published in 2008, a fantastic full English translation of ‘Opera’. To read Sculley’s book is to see how Scappi was indeed an incomparable Master cook. Opera is laid out with astonishing practicality, detail and precision that is not, arguably bettered nor equaled, until Escoffier’s ‘Guide Culinaire’ of 1903. Pope Pius instructed Scappi to teach his two able apprentices, Francisco Reinoso and Giovanni, everything he knew and to also write a book so all his secrets would be preserved. Reinoso was trained as a Steward and Giovanni in the kitchen with Scappi. Pope Pius's instructions to Scappi to undertake the trainings and record his knowledge on manuscript were taken up by him with sincere enthusiasm and diligence. Sculley's English translation acknowledges this and also clearly conveys that two prime ingredients that cannot be divorced from great cooking or a Master Cook; great passion and love. Scappi's Opera achieves its greatness because of that. The Opera comprises 6 books that clarify precisely everything the two apprentices needed to emulate the Master. Bartolomeo lists approximately 1000 recipes of the Renaissance cuisine and describes cooking techniques and tools, giving the first known picture of a fork. He declared Parmesan to be the best cheese on earth and noted that the liver of domestic goose raised by the Jews is of extreme size and weighs between two and three pounds, indicating that Jews of the time were practising the overfeeding of ducks and geese needed to produce Foie Gras. Recipe #140 of book 2 gives long, very detailed instructions for spit-roasting domestic Peacock. He also advises at the beginning of the recipe, that the White Peacocks have black flesh, but are more tasty than than all other fowl. It is treated using the same modern procedure for some game birds, being hung in this case, for eight days before plucking and drawing. Scappi thought that Caviar was better cooked. It came in sealed casks from Alexandria. He also serves it raw on warm toast with orange juice and pepper over it. In Book 3 there are recipes for Hermit Crabs. He informs us that there is not much meat in the claws, but the goodness lies in their viscera. It takes six crabs to fill one shell. Interestingly there were also soft-shell crabs, or as described in Opera; tender crabs, available only from early April to end of May. (These are the same as the famous seasonal soft-shell crabs, harvested on the eastern seaboard of the USA). There are also precise instructions for preparing and cooking Porcupine and baby Hedgehogs. Included are 230 recipes for pastry as well as for pizza and pasta; tortellini, tagliatelli, ravioli etc. All the recipes are very detailed, and the advice on how to keep all ingredients in their best state is exemplary. The qualities, personal and professional, needed to fulfill all positions in the household are comprehensively noted. There are even illustrations and instructions for the kitchen and the food service while the Cardinals are in Conclave. His detailed knowledge of the formal arrangements and procedures for them suggests he had observed and participated in many of them from the viewpoint of the kitchen. He observed and finely described the details of the ten weeks following the funeral of Pope Paul 111. Terence Sculley notes Scappi's account of the gratification he felt in fulfilling the grave and exceptional obligations of the various kitchens to serve the food to the conclave of 1549-50. It appears nothing is forgotten nor omitted from Opera. A fascinating account of elite gastronomic refinement. Bartolomeo Scappi died on the 13th April 1577 and was buried in the Guild church of SS. Vincenzo and Anastasio in Regola dedicated to cooks and bakers. The church was demolished in 1891 and the cook's' guild was moved to San Salvatore in Onda. What happened to Scappi’s remains is not recorded. Complete first editions of Scappi's Opera come up at auction extremely rarely. A 1570 edition was sold at Sothby's on June 5th 2013 for £37,500.oo. Cagle lists a 1570 2nd issue, a 5th of 1598 and a 9th of 1643. Bitting has a 1570 2nd issue with 16 plates missing, and 1605 folio ed and a 1590 ed with plates missing. Westbury had four 1570 2nd issues, two of 1610 and one of 1643. Vicaire records seven copies with only one 1570 2nd issue. Maggs Bros Cat.No 645 shows a 1570 2nd issue, a 2nd ed of 1581 and a 1605 ed. Mosimann has a 1570 2nd issue, thus proving the superlative rarity of this 1st issue of the 1570 1st edition.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11220

Secundus.   Dick Humelbergius    
Apician Morsels;
OR, TALES OF THE TABLE, KITCHEN, AND LARDER: CONTAINING A NEW AND IMPROVED CODE OF EATICS; SELECT EPICUREAN PRECEPTS; NUTRITIVE MAXIMS, REFLECTIONS, ANECDOTES, &C. ILLUSTRATING THE VERITABLE SCIENCE OF THE MOUTH; WHICH INCLUDES THE ART OF NEVER BREAKFASTING AT HOME, AND ALWAYS DINING ABROAD. BY DICK HUMELBERGIUS SECUNDUS. "O vow qui stomach Iaboatis, accurate, et ego vow restaurabo!" Vide p.106. "Always breakfast as if you did not intend to dine; and dine as if you had not broken your fast." -- Code Gourmand. New York: PRINTED BY J. & J. HARPER, 82 CLIFF-ST. SOLD BY COLLINS AND HANNAY, COLLINS AND CO., G. AND C. AND H. CAR-VILL., W. B. GILLEY , E. BLISS, AND O. A. ROORBACH; --PHILADELPHIA. CAREY, LEA, AND CARRY, J. GRIGG, TOWAR AND HOGAN, U. HUNT, R.. COWPERTHWAITE, E. LITTELL, AND BROTHERS, AND M'CARTY AND DAVIS; -- ALBANY, O. STEELE. 1829.
12mo. 190X116mm. Paste-down and end-paper marbled paper. [1] 1fep. [1] Frontispiece of Mr Eatingtown. Title page. [1] 2p Contents, xxv chapters. [2]9-212. 1fep. [1] End-paper and paste-down marbled paper. Half tan calf with black and tan speckled paper boards with nice patina. the spine has raised bands, gilt lines and gilt tooled devices. with a red label and gilt lettering. Internally very lightly age-browned throughout. A scarce book.
- Dick Hemelbergius Secundus, was actually a sixteen-century annotator named Gabriel Hummelberger making a comeback in this tome of 1829. In 'The Literary Gazette and Journal' for the year 1829, in the book review section, the critic pans the author of 'Apician Morsels' for his performance as not equal to that of a true man. He further takes an arrogant broadside at the author and other scribes of the day, for their use of French or other languages, which they do not understand. He goes further, boldly stating --- "Their style is as full of French and other phrases as a plum pudding is of plums and currants -- you cannot tell which is the radical tongue or the principal ingredient. It might be supposed that the English was copious enough to express all the ideas of the learned, imaginative, and highly gifted, and infinitely too copious to be needed by these literary shrimps, who have neither original thought nor ideas of any kind to express; ----- of these faults our Apician scribe affords us plenty of specimens". Strong stuff indeed. Apician Morsels; or Tales of the Table, Kitchen and Larder has been attributed to the Gothic novelist William Beckford, though others suspect the hand of Richard Chenevix, reviewer for the Edinburgh Review, (which may account for the venom in the critique of The Literary Gazette). 'Apician Morsels' announces "a New and Improved Code of Eatics," with "Select Epicurean Precepts," and "Nutritive Maxims, Reflections, Anecdotes . . . illustrating the Veritable Science of the Mouth." In addition to original essays on various aspects of cookery and good-living, Humelbergius takes his "Nutritive Varieties" (without attribution) from Grimod, along with other treatments of meals, invitations, and bonne chère.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11154

Senn   C. Herman     - The best edition.
Practical Gastronomy
AND CULINARY DICTIONARY WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED 'RECHERCHE COOKERY" UP-TO-DATE DESCRIPTIONS of the FOLLOWING BRANCHES -- HORS-D'OEUVRES, SOUPS, DRESSED FISH, ENTREES, REMOVES, SAUCES, ROASTS, SECOND COURSE DISHES, VEGETABLES, SALADS, SWEETS, AND SAVOURIES. Sketches and Quotations of Culinary Literature. A COMPLETE MENU COMPILER AND REGISTER OF MOST KNOWN DISHES IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH. WITH PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE SAME. THIRD EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED BY CHARLES HERMAN SENN. INSPECTING AND CONSULTING CHEF DU CUISINE, NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL OF COOKERY, DISTINGUISHED WITH THE GRAND DECORATION OF "LE CORDON ROUGE" GOLD MEDALLIST AND MEMBER OF THE ACADEMIE DE CUISINE, PARIS. Published by SPOTTISWOODE & CO., NEW-STREET SQUARE, LONDON. [1895]
Very thick 8vo. 17.5 X 11.5cm. Black paste-downs and end-papers. 1fep. Half Title with illustration on verso of 'Cornet of Nougat' [1] Frontispiece printed in brown. Title page with top illustration of 4 fairies working in a kitchen. (The punctuation on the title page is inconsistent: a single quotation-mark precedes, and double marks follow 'Recherche Cookery') [1] 3-6 Preface. 7-10 Contents. 11-916. 917-926 Index. 1-9 Advertisements. 9 plates printed in brown. Many in text illustrations. Modern half black calf with marbled boards and calf corners. Raised bands with beautiful gilt lines, dots and dentelles. With two calf labels, red and green with gilt writing. A pristine copy with very slight foxing on the half title and back of frontispiece.
- Charles Herman Senn, born in Lirstal, Switzerland,1864, died at his desk at 110 Victoria Street, London on 18th October 1934. He was a prolific writer of cookery books. Driver lists thirty two separate titles with one hundred and forty three various editions. Driver states; "Considering Senn's stature in the culinary world and his remarkable output of cookery books, it is odd that there is no authoritative biography or evaluation of the man and his work. The richest source of information is LCoF which owns Senn's library. Most significant in the collection are Senn's working copies of his own books marked up with changes for subsequent editions. Also in the collection are review copies signed by their authors and sent to Senn for his comments, which as a group present a picture of the cookery-book publishing world of the time with an immediacy not found in the copyright libraries." This third edition of Senn's 'Practical Gastronomy' is considered the best and the scarcest and the most appreciated by collectors and chefs. This edition had the chapter 'Recherche cookery' added. This increased the book to 806 numbered recipes, in turn creating a very thick tome and a fascinating read.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11011