Kriegl.   Georg Christof     ITEM # 1. Rare. A limited number for VIP guests.
Erb-Huldigung,
ITEM # 1. Welche der Allerdurchleuchtigst-Grobmachtigsten FRAUEN/FRAUEN MARIAE THERESIAE, Zu Hungarn,r und Boheim Konigin, Alls Ertz-Herzogin zu Oesterreich, Von Denen gesammten Nider-Oesterreichischen Standen/ von Tralaten/ Herren/ Rittern/ auch Stadt und Meardten alleruntertbanigft abgeleget Den 22. Novembris Anno 1740. Und auf Verordnung [sec.] ohl-ermelten Loblichen Herren Standen/ mit allen Umstanden ausfuhrlich beschrieden worden Duch Herrn Georg Christoph Kriegl/ einer Lobl. Sci. Dest. Landschaft Syndicum. (Elaborate printer's border device) Gedruckt zu Wienn in Oesterreich, Ben Yohann Baptist Schilgen, einer Hochlobl. Nider-Oesterreichischen Landschaft Buchbrudern.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 17.3"x11" (280x440mm) Large folio. 1fep. Engraved frontispiece of Empress Mariae-Theresiae. [1] Title page in red and black. [1] (1)4-92. 1fep. With eleven beautiful engraved plates; 4 single page, 1 very long extended 3'11" folding plate of the coronation procession, (see image #6 below) and 6 double page (some of them showing the banquets set up for the ceremony guests). The large folding plate has had a tear expertly repaired. The frontispiece slightly brittle at the edges but not affecting the engraving. Internally very clean with wide 2.5" margins. Full contemporary dark brown calf with a blind stamped coat of arms of the Archduchy of Austria in faded gilt on the top board and those of Austria-Enns on the lower board.. A very handsome copy with a nice patina.
- A magnificent book, that is a testimonial work to commemorate the ceremony of homage (Erbhuldigung) a month after the coronation of Mariae Theresa of Austria, on October 20th, 1740, who succeeded to the throne from her father, Charles VI of Habsburg. Printed in a limited number of copies to be distributed to entitled guests. The last 6 of the magnificent engraved copper plates depict richly laid tables for the royal lunch with the guests already at the table and with a list of the entitled ones. The plates engraved by Muller GA from drawings by A. Altomonte, who was architect and engineer of the court. Six of the plates were first used in Gulich’s description of the entry of Joseph 1 on 22nd September, 1705. This is an uncommon and very scarce book. The plates are especially interesting to the cookery book collector, in that they convey the laid tables and lavish banqueting set-up for the highest layer of Austrian society of that time.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11046

La Chapelle.   Vincent     - Published first in English then French.
The Modern Cook:
CONTAINING INSTRUCTIONS For Preparing and Odering Publick Enter-tainments for the Tables of Princes, Am-bassadors, Noblemen, and Magistrates. As also the least Expensive Methods of providing for private Families, in a very elegant Manner. New Receipts for Dressing of Meat, Fowl, and Fish, and making Ragouts, Fricassees, and Pastry of all Sorts, in a Method never before Publish'd. Adorn'd with COPPER PLATES, Exhibiting the Order of Placing the different Dishes, etc. on the Table, in the most polite Way. By Mr. VINCENT LA CHAPELLE, Late Cheif Cook to his Highness the Prince of ORANGE. The Third Edition. LONDON: Printed for Thomas Osborne, in Gray's-Inn. MDCCXLIV.
Third edition. Complete. 2feps. Title page. Dedication on verso. p 1-IV. p IX-XL. The Contents. 1-432. Illustrations. 6 letterpress folding plates of bills of fare and elaborate table settings. 2feps. A nice contemporary full dark brown calf binding with raised bands on the spine. A red and green label with gilt lettering. Gilt lines on the spine and boards. Internally very clean throughout. A beautiful copy, with one of the folding plates measuring an unusual eighteen inches long.
- Vincent La Chapelle, French Master cook to Phillip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, then William IV, Prince of Orange, after to Madame de Pompadour the mistress of Louis XV. When Chesterfield was sent to the Hague as Ambassador to arrange the marriage of William of Orange to Anne, daughter of George 11, he took La Chapelle with him. After Chesterfield returned to London, La Chapelle stayed behind and entered the service of William of Orange, to whom his books are dedicated. (Mossiman pub. Collection). Cagle has a 3rd edition of 3 volumes, dated 1736, with 16 folding plates.-- Maclean also has third editions of 1736 and 1744, both 3 volumes, a 4th edition of 1751 in 1 volume, but annoyingly, no mention of plates. -- Bitting has the 1st edition of 1733 in 3 volumes with 16 folding plates. She also has the 4th of 1751 with 6 folding plates. -- Oxford gives the 1st of 1733 in 2 volumes, the 2nd in 3 volumes and the 3rd of 1744 and a 4th of 1751, both 1 volume only, with no plates noted - urgh!. Oxford states: "This seems a most excellent and well arranged book, though some of the recipes are very strange. A 'strengthening broth' is made of two hundred sparrows with other ingredients. For besieged towns the author gives a recipe for 'broth cakes' which may be carried about, and 'preserv'd above a year'. The broth cakes are obviously a precursor to the modern day stock cubes. Vincent La Chapelle is now known to have been a little creative with the truth regarding his employment record and other issues. Maclean on p85. raises these points and also mentions Philip and Mary Hyman's very good article in Petits Propos Culinaires vol 2, pp 44-45, highlighting La Chapelle's famous spat with Massialot. Whatever claims of plagiarism between these two famous Chefs, this is nevertheless a great cookbook. Uniquely, La Chapelle published this work first in English in 1733 and then brought out the first French edition (Le Cuisinier Moderne) in 4 volumes in 1735. A 2nd French edition followed in 1742 with a new volume added. All complete copies or sets of La Chapelle's cookery books are extremely scarce.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10982

Lamb.   Patrick     - First edition - first issue - 1710.
Royal Cookery; or, the Complete Court-Cook.
CONTAINING THE Choicest Receipts in all the particular Branches of COOKERY, Now in Use in the Queen's PALACES OF St. James, Hampton-Court, and Kensington, Windsor.With nearly Forty Figures(curiously engraven Copper) of the magnificent Entertainments as Coronations, Istal-ments, Ball, Weddings, &c. at Court; Also Receipts for making the Soups, Jellies, Bisques, Ragoo's, Pastes, Tan-sies, Forc'd-Meats, Cakes, Puddings, &c. By PATRICK LAMB, Esq, Near 50 Years Master-Cook to their late Majesties King Charles II, King James II, King William and Queen Mary, and to Her Present Majesty Queen ANNE. To which are added, Bills of Fare for every Season in the Year. London, Printed for Abel Roper, and sold by John Morphew, near Stationers-Hall. 1710.
FIRST EDITION. 1st ISSUE. 1710. 8vo 195x125mm. 1fep. Half title. [1] Title Page. [1] 6p Preface. 4p Contents. 2p Content of Tables. (1)2-127 with 36 plates, many folding. [1] 12p Bills of Fare. 4p Advertisements. 1fep. Full contemporary dark panelled calf with blind tooled fillets on the boards. Expertly rebacked with raised bands and gilt lettering. A handsome very clean copy with a fine patina.
- There is some confusion amongst dealers, catalogue compilers and bibliographers about the issue sequence of the two first editions of 1710. One issue point asks which comes first; the Roper imprint or the other, the Aitkins imprint. Another issue point is the date that is printed on later editions on the third line of adverts at the back of the book. The copy on offer here has no date in the adverts. It has the half title; often missing and all 36 plates as called for. Confusion also exists over the plate count. Bitting cites 34, Viciare calls for 36 and Alan Davidson's copy, sold on March 24th 2011 at Bloomsbury auctions, had 35 plates, conforming with the printed 'Contents of the Tables' list. These oddities appear to constitute printer's mistakes rather than defining different editions. Patrick Lamb (1650-1708/9) began work in the royal household as a child. In 1683 he advanced to become royal cook, then in 1677 he was appointed as master cook to the queen consort, a post that he held jointly with that of office of Sergeant of His Majesty's Pastry in Ordinary, to which he was appointed in November 1677; he became Master Cook to the monarch in February 1683. Lamb's culinary skills were most famously in evidence at extraordinary events like coronations. Lamb's name is recorded in Francis Sandford's famous book 'The History of the Coronation of James II'- printed 1687. He is given a stipend of gold coins for his efforts as Master Cook to His Majesty during the Coronation feast. At the auction of the cookery book collection of Tore Wretman, sold in Southby's, London, Thursday 2 October 1997. an incomplete copy of Sandford's book was sold with a manuscript note on the fep. in Lambs handwriting and signed by him, stating: 'his copy given to him by His Majesty'. Lamb was Master-Cook to five Monarchs and his book was the most heavily illustrated English cookery book to date. Some of Lamb's contemporaries contend that this book was speculatively published under his name. ODNB remarks that the text incorporates recipes for elaborate royal dishes alongside lavish royal table layouts that suggest the text and additions were drawn from Lamb's own papers. There were new editions in 1716, 1726 and 1731. This one is a very clean and complete copy of the rare first edition. Lamb's posthumously published book (He died in 1709) is one of the most important items in any comprehensive antiquarian cookery book collection. Good copies continue to find very high prices. In April 7th 2008, a gastronomic collection assembled by Walter and Lucille Fillin and sold at the Swann Galleries, NYC, featured a first edition of Lamb's 'Royal Cookery' (the same as the copy on offer here). It was sold to the trade for $19,200.oo. According to Swann, this set an auction-price record.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11025

Langham.   William     - The 1633 edition.
THE GARDEN OF HEALTH
CONTAINING THE sundry rare and hidden vertues and properties of all kindes of Simples and Plants. Together with the manner they are to bee vsed and applyed in medicine for the health of mans body, against diuers diseases and infirmities most common amongst men. Gathered by the long experience and industry onf WILLIAM LANGHAM. Practitioner in Physicke. The second Edition corrected and amended. LONDON, Printed by THOMAS HARPER, with permission of the Company of Stationers. M.DC.XXXIII.
4to. 198 x 148mm. 1fep with flowing script - George King senior and Thomas King junior 1703. Title page. [1] 2 pages To the Reader. 4 pages Table of Simples. (1)2-702. 66 pages of A Table. 2feps with George King in script dated 1653, and George Thrift 1709. The dense text printed mainly in gothic type and 'indices' at the end of the chapters in roman type.Text block nice and tight and uniformly age browned but all clearly legible. Original dark brown leather on boards with a skillfully relaid spine with raised bands and gilt lettering. Has a nice patina. The inside cover paste-downs not placed showing original boards and leather edging.
- William Langham's ‘Book of Health’ is a concise medicinal herbal with many recipes interwoven into the text. Langham devotes a chapter to each plant, describing its parts and their uses. To every item of information he added a number, and at the end of the chapter there is a table of conditions relating to the numbers in the text. For instance under Fennel, one of the longest entries there are 132 items of information, ranging from ‘Adder biting’ to ‘Yard ache’. Included is a discussion of almonds, anis, apples, artichokes, barley, basil, beans, beets, bread, butter, capers, cardamom, carrots, caraway, chestnuts, cinnamon, citrons, cloves, cockles, coriander, crab, cress, cucumber, currants; that’s just a selection taken from the A-Cs. With two general indexes, one consisting of a list of 421 simples. The other index is the converse of the lists at the end of individual plants, as it indicates the ills and diseases that can be helped by the use of the many different plants. For example, forty-eight plants were indexed under consumption and eighty-eight under colic, whilst 'lust to abate' merited twenty, with thirty-five to cause it. The table repeatedly lists 10,000 plants that can be used for more than 1,150 conditions and functions. Langham includes some American plants that had only recently reached Europe. He was not the first to use this system. Henry Lyte’s English translation of Dodoen’s famous herbal ‘The New Herbal’ of 1578, [see item 11078 on this site] has four separate indexes; one for classic Latin names of plants; one for apothecaries, the Arabs and modern herbalists; one for the English names; and the fourth a subject index of what plants could do. While the title must have been influenced by the 'Gart der Gesundheit' published by Johann Wonnecke of Kaub in 1485, or the '[H]Ortus Sanitatis', published by Jacob Meydenbach in Mainz Germany on 23 June 1491, the text is quite independent. Langham's very rare text is absorbing and interesting, and when checked against known modern remedies it is amazing how many are similar. Every page has nuggets of information that seem to transcend time. The first edition was published in London, 1579. In the exhibition catalogue "Four Hundred Years of English Diet and Cookery" at the Bancroft Library, it is noted that "This may be the first use of cross-referencing." Like the Lilly Library, the Bancroft has the second edition only.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11197

Lemery.   M. Louis     The very rare first English edition.
A TREATISE OF FOODS In GENERAL:
First, The Difference and Choice which ought to be made of each Sort in parti-cular. Secondly, The Good and Ill Effects produced by them. Thirdly, The Principles wherewith they abound. And, Fourthly, The Time, Age and Constitution they [f]suit with. To which are added, Remarks upon each Chapter; wherein their Nature and U[f]ses are explained, according to the Principles of Chymi[f]siry and Mechani[f]sm. Written in French, By M. LOUIS LEMERY, Regent-Doctor of the Faculty of Phy[f]sick at Paris, and of the Academy Royal of Sciences. Now done into English. LONDON, Printed for John Taylor, at the Ship in St. Pauls-Church-Yard. MDCCIV.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1 fep with provenance - Tomasina Bunyan, dated March 1830. [1] The Appropriation page is mis-bound, it should be bound in after the Title page. [1]. 3p To Monsieur Boudin. [1] 6p The Preface. 6p A Table of Chapters. (1)11-XX Of Foods in General. 1-310. 6 p Index. 2p Advertisements. 1 fep. The text block has been rebound tightly. The pages are evenly age browned with notations & some marginalia in an 18th century hand. Overall a fine copy. Contemporary dark brown panelled calf boards with a re-laid matching modern calf spine with raised bands with a black morocco label with gilt writing and tooling.
- M. Louis Lémery, - 1677–1743, wrote and published the first French edition of ‘Traité des alimens ‘ in 1702. In 1704 this very rare first English edition was translated and printed. Lemery was appointed physician at the Hôtel-Dieu de Paris in 1710, and became demonstrator of chemistry at the Jardin du Roi in 1731. He was also the author of ‘Dissertation sur la nature des os ‘ - 1704, as well as of a number of papers on chemical topics. His father Nicolas Lémery, (November 17, 1645 – June 19, 1715) a chemist, was born at Rouen. He was one of the first to develop theories on acid-base chemistry. Lemery's extremely scarce antiquarian book is also found in facsimile in the Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. They have made it available as part of their commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of facsimiles of rare and hard-to-find books. Bitting p.281; Cagle 821; Maclean p.89; Oxford 1704.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11191

Lemery.   M. Louis     The very scarce 2nd edition.
A TREATISE OF FOODS In GENERAL:
1. The Difference and Choice which ought to be made of each Sort in particular. 11. The Good and Ill Effects produced by them. 111. The Principles wherewith they abound. And, 1V. The Time, Age and Constitution they [f]suit with. To which are added, Remarks upon each Chapter; wherein their Nature and U[f]ses are explained, according to the Principles of Chymi[f]siry and Mechani[f]sm. Written in French, By M. LOUIS LEMERY, Regent-Doctor of the Faculty of Phy[f]sick at Paris, and of the Academy Royal of Sciences. Now done into English. LONDON, Printed for Andrew Bell, at the Cross Keys and Bible in Cornhill. 1706.
8vo. 1 fep. [1] Sponsors page dated 1703. Title Page. The Appropriation page. 3p To Monsieur Boudin. [1] 6p The Preface. 6p A Table of Chapters. (1)11-XX Of Foods in General. 1-320. 6 p Index. 2p Advertisements. 1 fep. The pages are evenly and very lightly age browned. Overall a very nice copy. Very nice contemporary dark brown two tone paneled calf boards and calf spine with raised bands.
- M. Louis Lémery, - 1677–1743, wrote and published the first French edition of ‘Traité des alimens‘ in 1702. In 1704 the very rare first translated English edition was published. This second English translation of 1706 is equally as scarce to rare. The French editions appear on the market more often, but are still quite scarce. Oxford as usual is perceptive. He states - "It is a very interesting book and full of ancient lore and superstition" as well as having good 18th century information on all sorts of contemporary food items. Rather than the usual rote following of a recipe, this book can be picked up and read more conventionally. Due to its rarity it does not appear in most of the great collections sold in past auctions.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11192

Liebig Company's.       - A beautiful copy of a scarce booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. Spine is relaid crimson cloth. Inside very clean with slight foxing on the title page. The guttering has been strenghtened with a light foxing not affecting the text. Overall a very good complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is rarely found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later, Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron, known as a very active organic chemist was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no debris of skin, bones nor meat) The promising lucrative plan appealed to the Baron so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of around 3000.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11063

Liebig Company's.       - A nice copy of a beautifully designed booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. The guttering has a little rust form the staples not affecting the look or text. Overall a very nice complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is not usually found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron was known as a very active organic chemist and was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no weight of skin, bones nor meat) The idea appealed to the Baron and promised to be very lucrative, so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, (see image #2 below) where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of 3000. The meat extract was a molasses-like black spread packaged in an opaque white glass bottle, and contained only reduced meat stock and salt (4%). It took 3 kg of meat to make 100 g of extract. By 1875, 500 tonnes of the extract were being produced at the Fray Bentos plant each year. The manufacture of the meat extract was done under the strict control of a company chemist. It was then shipped to Antwerp. On arrival in Europe it was again inspected and samples of each consignment were tested for composition and flavour. In the booklet the public are cautioned against various imitations. In 1873, Liebig's began producing tinned corned beef, sold under the label Fray Bentos. Later, freezer units were installed, enabling the company to also export frozen and chilled raw meat. A cheaper version of Liebig extract was introduced under the name Oxo in 1899. Later, the Oxo bouillon cube was introduced. In the 1920s, the company acquired the Oxo Tower Wharf on the south bank of the river Thames in London. There they erected a factory, demolishing most of the original building, preserving and building upon the riverside frontage. The Liebig Extract of Meat Company was acquired by the Vestey Group in 1924 and the factory was renamed El Anglo. Liebig merged with Brooke Bond in 1968, which was in turn acquired by Unilever in 1984. Liebig produced many illustrated advertising products: table cards, menu-cards, children games, free trade card sets, calendars, posters, poster-stamps, paper and other ephemera. These were often in the form of trading card sets with stories, historical tidbits, geographic tidbits, and so on. The sets usually consisted of six cards, one card included per product sale. Many famous artists were contracted to design those series of cards, which were first produced using true lithography, then litho chromo, chromolithography and finally offset printing. The cards remain popular with collectors and are often collected in albums. Copies of Liebig's recipe booklet are also much sought after. Due to the fact that they did not survive well in the oily and robust kitchen environment, lovely clean copies such as this one are quite rare.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11147

LOVEL.   HENRY     - A medieval chirograph manuscript - 1259.
An esteemed 13th century Royal cook.
In the household of Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, consort of King Henry III, c.1223-91.
The manuscript is very fine vellum. 242 x 253mm. 24 lines, in a handsome book-hand medieval script in Latin. Indented chirograph deed cut in two proven parts, with one part given to each party. Without a seal. 2 small wormholes, folds, slightly creased, small stain, slightly browned but in remarkable condition bearing in mind the date; 1259. Housed in a strong cardboard folder with marbled paper and large label.
- A charter agreement between Hugh Gernegan and Henry Lovel, the greatly favoured cook of her ladyship the Queen. Hugh has demised to Henry his manor of 'Harpefeld' (actual now: Harpsfield, Hatfield, Hertfordshire) with all its tenants' homages, lands and services; also referring to a rent in St. Albans. as received from Hugh and Ela his wife to farm [lease] for four years from the feast of All Saints to Henry III on 1st. Nov. 1259, for ten marks [£6 13s. 4d.] a year, payable in the King's hall at Westminster. Witnesses: Sir William de Hecham, Robert de Ehelniaresford and others. Quite how Henry Loval came to receive the contents of this charter is not known. Another great gift from the King to Henry Lovel is also mentioned in the Fine Rolls of Henry III. - "5 November 1256, For Master Henry Lovel. The king has granted by his charter to Master Henry Lovel, the queen's cook, a certain place at Crochefeld' in the parish of Bray which contains ten acres and the fourth part of one acre by the king's perch of 20 feet to have to him and his heirs forever, rendering therefor 41d. per annum to the bailiff of Bray who shall be at that time for the king's use for all service etc." We see here that Lovel was already relatively very well-off even before the receiving the contents of the velum manuscript above. - The fine rolls in the reign of King Henry III 1216–1272, was an agreement to pay the king a sum of money for a specified concession. The rolls on which the fines were recorded, provide the earliest systematic evidence of what people and institutions across society wanted from the king and he was prepared to give. The earliest surviving rolls compiled by the English royal chancery exist in almost continuous sequence from 1199. They are preserved in The National Archives at Kew. For Henry III’s reign there are fifty-six rolls, as this one also, are written in Latin on parchment. Since Henry’s regnal year began on 28 October, each roll runs from 28 October in one calendar year to 27 October in the next. Over the course of the King's reign the rolls expanded greatly in length, many having a dozen or more membranes and containing over 30,000 words. They open a large window onto the politics, government, economy and society of England in the hinge period between the establishment of Magna Carta at the start of Henry’s reign and the parliamentary state which was emerging at its end. Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 – 24/25 June 1291) was a French noblewoman who became Queen consort of England as the wife of King Henry III from 1236 until his death in 1272. She was married at 14 years old. She served as regent of England during the absence of her spouse in 1253 who was away fighting in France. (It was also rumoured that at this time Eleanor granted Henry Lovel a small forested estate). Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought many relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry Londoners who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables. Eleanor had five children, including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion. In 1272 Henry died, and their son Edward became king. She remained in England as queen dowager, and raised several of her grandchildren. She retired in 1286 to Amesbury Priory in Wiltshire, eight miles north of Salisbury. Eleanor died on 24/25 June 1291 at the priory and was buried there. The site of her grave is unknown, making her the only English queen without a marked grave. Her heart was taken to London where it was buried at the Franciscan priory of Greyfriars. It is not recorded when Henry Lovel's period of service started or finished in the Royal kitchens. What is clear, is that he must have been very highly regarded as a servant and cook. He brings to mind Patrick Lamb, another famous royal cook, whose fine cookery book of 1710 (ref:# 11025 on this web-site) mirrors the same royal patronage that elevated Henry Lovel's position in life. Check online; Item # 56 in the Fine Roll C 60/54, 41 Henry 111 -- https://frh3.org.uk/content/calendar/roll_054.html.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11050

LOVELL.   MATILDA SOPHIA     Hugely under-rated research and cookery book.
THE EDIBLE MOLLUSCA
of GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND with Recipes for Cooking them. by M.S. LOVELL. "And the recipes and different modes of dressing - I am prepared to teach the world for nothing, - If men are only wise enough to learn." Atheneus, Deipnos, Book i. .60. SECOND EDITION. (aa small printer's device). LONDON; L. REEVE AND Co., 5 HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. [All rights reserved]
Second edition, first issue 1884. Small 8vo. 190 x 125mm. With 12 fine hand coloured lithographs. (illustrator - G.B.Sowerby). 1fep. Half-title. [2] Coloured frontis of various edible snails w/ Latin and English names. Title page. [1] 1page Preface. [1] 1p Contents. 1p Illustrations. [1] First illustrated page of a Clam. (1)2-274. 275-287 List of works consulted. 1p Errata. (1)290-310 Index. [2] (1)2-16 Reeve and Co List of works. 1fep. Full purple cloth binding, slightly mottled, with blind tooling on both covers and gilt text on the faded spine and a gilt snail on the front. Internally very clean.
- From part of the preface we learn of Ms Lovell's motivation for writing about this intriguing wide-ranging subject: We understand the good qualities of oysters, cockles, and a few other kinds; but some equally nutritious (which are universally eaten on the Continent) are seldom, if ever, seen in our markets, or are only used locally as food, and the proper modes of cooking them are scarcely known. I have therefore endeavoured to call attention to all the eatable species common on our coasts, and also to those which, though not found here in abundance, might be cultivated as easily as oysters, and form valuable articles of food: In an article written in 2007 by S.P. Dance on the Deep Dyve Library website, we learn that Thomas Bell wrote a review of this book on 'The Athenaeum' in 1867, the year of publication of the 1st edition. It is obvious that he had studied it closely. Stating in his review; "The title of this book indicates but a small item in its contents, and does scant justice to its real interest. The gastronome who takes it up as a mere cookery-book, or the general reader who, by the same impression, rejects it unexamined, will alike upon a partial and inadequate notion of its merits. In fulfilling what purports to be its main design, then it has indeed, exhausted the subject in a most satisfactory manner, and laid before us the modes of preparing an immense number of tempting dishes, many, perhaps most, of which are new to the English epicure". Indeed, the book is full of surprises in its text. The small gems of advice, the numerous insights gleaned, the many recipes for Oysters, Snails, Mussels, Sea Urchins, Cockles, Razor Clams, Scallops etc, makes this a seriously underestimated book that is now becoming sought after. Ms Lovell lists within 14 pages, approx. 430 sources researched. A great, scarce unusual book.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11299