Cheyne.   George M.D. F.R.S.    
AN ESSAY OF HEALTH AND LONG LIFE.
By George Cheyne, M.D. F.R.S. (a single line) The Second Edition. (a single line) Greek lettering – Hippoc. An Imbecillis (quo in Numero magna Pars Urbanorum, omnesque pene Cupidi Li-terarum sunt) Observatio major neces-saria est: ut quod vel corporis, vel Loci, vel Studii Ratio detrahit, Cu-ra sestituat. Celf. (a single line) LONDON. Printed for George Strahan, at the Golden Ball over-against the Rpyal Exchange in Cornhill’ and J.Leake, Bookseller at Bath. 1724. (the page with a two line border)
8vo. 1fep. Title Page. [1] Dedication to Sir Joseph Jekyll. [1] i-xx Preface. c-e4 Contents. e5-e6 In Clarissimi Medici with printers device. 1p Advertisements. (1)2-232. Inside the text as new. Full original calf binding. Dark and light brown panelling on boards with blind tooling, and raised bands on spine. A very good copy in fine original state.
- A very interesting 18th century treatise on health, well written by an eminent Scottish pioneering physician; George Cheyne M.D. R.C. E.d. R.S.S. (1671–1743) who regulated his own bad health by embracing vegetarianism after becoming obese with rich food and drink. He was a popular doctor and published a number of treatises on health and diet. There are chapters on the use and effects of meat, fish, vegetables wine etc. He also published other works on fevers, nervous disorders, and hygiene. In 1740, he penned his last work, a study of nutrition and natural living, 'The Natural Method of Cureing [sic] the Diseases of the Body, and the Disorders of the Mind'. Bitting p86 for a copy in French. Not in any other bibliographies. Another second edition, but confusingly dated 1725, was sold at the auction of the Marcus Crahan collection in New York, 1984.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11228

Child.   Lydia Maria    
The Frugal Housewife.
DEDICATED TO THOSE WHO ARE NOT ASHAMED OF ECONOMY.. BY MRS CHILD, AUTHOR OF THE "MOTHER'S BOOK" THE "LITTLE GIRL'S BOOK" ETC. A fat kitchen maketh a lean will - Franklin. "Economy is a poor man's revenue; extravagance a rich amn's ruin." Ninth Edition. CORRECTED AND ARRANGED BY THE AUTHOR. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, HINTS TO PERSONS OF MODERATE FORTUNE. SOME VALUABLE RECEIPTS. ETC. ETC. LONDON: PRINTED FOR T.T. AND J. TEGG, CHEAPSIDE; N. HAILES, PICADILLY; BOWDREY AND KERBY, OXFORD STREET; ALSO R. GRIFFIN AND CO. GLASGOW. 1832.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 12vo. Yellow paste-downs and end-papers at each end. 1fep. [1] Engraved frontispiece. Title page. [1] 1-172. 173-176 Index. 6 pages of very neat manuscript writing on the feps and paste-down. Original maroon calf boards with bright original gilt lettering "Mrs Child's Frugal Housewife 2s/6d." Sympathetically relaid smooth spine. Internally very clean. An excellent copy.
- This is a lovely and interesting book. The first edition (the Frugal Housewife) was published in America. 1929. Bitting informs us the title was deposited in the District Clerk's Office by David L. Child, the 12th day of November, 1829. Other editions cited by Lincoln are; the 2nd 1830; 4th, 5th, 6th,7th, all 1831; 8th, 1832. Because this edition, the 9th, was published in England, further American editions had the title changed to "The American Frugal Housewife" This new title reached thirty two editions by 1850. Oxford only cites the 15th English edition of 1835. Lownestien; p31, confusingly states that the name of the American edition was changed in 1832 because there was an "English book of the same name" She seems unaware that both the new 'American Frugal Housewife' and the English 'Frugal Housewife' were one and the same, albeit, published in two different countries. The confusion is even more widespread. Michigan State University Libraries have an essay on the 1830 American edition in their 'Historic American Cookbook Project'--'Feeding America' in their Digital Collections that states; "The Frugal Housewife was first published in Boston in 1829 and was reprinted at least four times in the next two years. By the eighth edition of 1832, the name had been changed to The American Frugal Housewife to differentiate it from the English work of Susannah Carter." Yes, Carter did publish a cookery book called 'The Frugal Housewife' but it is a totally different book that was first published sixty four years previously in 1765. Finally, after studying this copy being offered here, against the text of the facsimile copy of The American Frugal Housewife, twenty-ninth edition of 1844, with the introduction by Jan Longone, there is no doubt they are both different editions of the same book. Quite how an American cookery book, barely three years into publication, came to be printed in England, is a mystery on which this compiler would appreciate some clarity. Lowenstien p2, p25, p31.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10907

Chomell.   Noel    
Dictionaire Oeconomique
2 VOLUMES: Dictionaire Oeconomique: or, The Family Dictionary. CONTAINING The most experienced Methods of improving Estates and of preserving Health, with many approved Remedies for most Distempers of the Body of Man, Cattle and other Creatures, and the best Means for attaining long Life.-- The most advantageous Ways of Breeding, Feeding and Ordering all Sorts of Do-mestick Animals, as Horses, Kine, Sheep, Swine, Poultry, Bees, silkworms, &c.-- The different Kinds of Nets, Snares and Engines for taking all Sorts of Fish, Birds, and other Game. Great Variety of Rules, Directions, and new Discoveries, relating to Gardening, Husbandry, Soils and Manures of all Sorts; the Planting and Culture of Vines, Fruit Trees, Forest Trees, Underwoods, Shrubs, Flowers, and their several Uses; the Knowledge of Foreign Drugs, Dies, Domestick and Exotick Plants and Herbs, with their Specifick Qualities and medicinal Virtues.--- The best and cheapest Ways of Providing and improving all manner of Meats and Drinks; of preparing several Sorts of Wines, Waters and Liquors for every Season, both by Distillation and otherwise: Of preserving all kind of Fruits as well dry as liquid, and making divers Sweetmeats and Works of Sugar, and other profitable Curiosities, both in the Confectionary and Culinary Arts of Housewifery.--- Means of Making the most Advantage of the Manufacturers of Soap, Starch, Spinning, Cotton, Thread, &c.--- The Methods to take or destroy Vermin and other Animals, injurious to Garden-ing, Husbandry, and all rural Oeconomy; with a Description of Graden and other Country Tools and Utensils.--- An account of the several Weights, Mearures, &c. of Metals and mi-nerals, with their Preparations and Uses.--- All Sorts of Rural Sports and Exercises, conducing to the Benefit and innocent Enjoyments of Life; as also Painting in Miniature, and divers other Arts and Terms of Art axplained, for the Entertainment and Amusement of Gentlemen, Ladies, &c.--- The whole illustrated throughout with very Variety of Figures, for the rea-dier understanding and practising of things to which they belong. Done into English form the Second Edition, lately printed at Paris, in two Volumes, Folio, written by M. Chomell: with considerable CONSIDERATIONS and IMPROVEMENTS. Revised and Recommended by Mr, R, Bradley, Professor of Botany in the University of Cambridge, and F.R.S. In Two Volumes. VOL.1. From A-to-H. VOL.11. From H-to-Z. LONDON: Printed for D. Midwinter, at the Three Crowns in St. Paul's Church-Yard. M.DCC.XXV.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1725. Both Volumes - Folio. 32.2cm x 20cm. Volume 1. 1fep. Title page in red and black text. [1] 2pp Dedication to Theodore Jacobson, Esq; (with nice engraved devices) 4pp Preface. B-I. (no page numbers) 2fep. Original thick dark brown calf boards, re-backed in dark brown calf with raised bands and dark green calf label with gilt writing. Very sturdy. Internally clean and tight. Volume 2. 1fep. Aaaa-Z. (no page numbers) 1pp List of Books printed. 1fep. Original thick dark brown calf boards, re-backed in dark brown calf with raised bands and dark green calf label with gilt writing. Very sturdy. Internally clean and tight. A very nice copy of the rare first English edition.
- A major French-language compendium of eighteenth century information on domestic management that was widely read in Europe and later had important influence on the development of encyclopedic resources in early nineteenth century Japan. The dictionary, compiled by a French priest, ran to several editions in continental Europe but only three editions in English; this London copy and two later Dublin editions. Some nice woodcuts throughout the text expand the topics covered; these include agriculture, beekeeping, bird-traps, garden design, heraldic devices etc. Other sections include Baking, Bread-making, Sweet-making and Dessert with three woodcuts showing how to lay oval and round dessert tables plus a table ready-laid. This edition was not only translated from the work by M. Chomell but also Anglicised by Mr Bradley. A fascinating glimpse of some of the skills-for-living used in the first half of the eighteenth century.

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ref number: 11015

Clermont.   B.[Bernard]     - The English translation of 'Les Soupers de la Cour' and 'La Cuisine Reformee'
The Professed Cook
OR, THE MODERN ART OF Cookery, Pastry, and Confectionary, MADE PLAIN AND EASY. Consisting of the most approved Methods in the FRENCH as well as ENGLISH COOKERY. IN WHICH The French Names of all the different Dishes are given and explained, whereby every Bill of Fare becomes intelligible and familiar. CONTAINING --- [Chapters I. to XXII] INCLUDING A TRANSLATION OF LES SOUPERS DE LA COUR; WITH THE Addition of the best Receipts which have ever appeared in the French or English Languages, and adapted to the London Markets. BY B. CLERMONT. Who has been many Years Clerk of the Kitchen in someof the first Families of this Kingdom, and lately to the Right Hon. the Earl of ABINGDON. The THIRD EDITION, revised and much enlarged. LONDON: Printed for W. DAVIS, in Picadilly; T CASLON, opposite Stationer's Hall: G. ROBINSON, in Paternoster-Row; F. NEWBERY, the Corner of St. Paul's Church-Yard; and the AUTHOR, in Princes-Street, Cavendish-Square. M.DCC.LXXVI.
8vo. Pp. Title Page. (i-x) 48pp 'Contents' (1-610) Fully bound in dark brown calf with blind tooled borders. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and lettering and a red label. Internally quite clean and tight, however some slight foxing to first part of contents page and the title page is browned and slightly worn.
- The English translation of Menon's two works 'Les Soupers de la Cour' and 'La Cuisine Reformee'. 'Les Soupers de la Cour' was first published in 1755 and deals with dining at its most lavish, not only the grand banquets but also the smaller dinner party for twenty or thirty people, at which over a hundred dishes might be served in five courses. "Menon's book covers menus, hors d'oeuvres, entrees, and some desserts. An entire chapter is devoted to sherbets or ices and ice cream. Like Marin that other great contemporary of Menon's, both placed emphasis on their sauces. Menon's recipes were surprisingly varied, coming not only from France but Italy, Germany, Ceylon, and Flanders and used in everything from hors d'oeuvres to desserts."-- (Harrison, 'Une Affaire du Gout' 1983.) Bernard Clermont first published his English translation in 1767 under the title of 'The Art of Modern Cookery Displayed' The second English edition of 1769 had the same contents as the first but the title was changed to 'The Professed Cook'. For this third edition, however, Clermont added a considerable amount of material of his own with Menon's original work taking less of a prominent place on the title-page even though the complete text is still present. (James Burmester - Abebooks.) Of interest is the large number of ice cream recipes, such as; Cinnamon Ice, Ices of Coriander Seed, Aniseed and Junpiper Berries as well as a very unusual selection of Iced Cheeses. A fine translation of two of the great early French culinary classics.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10944

Cobbett.   William    
Cottage Economy
CONTAINING In relative to the brewing of BEER, making of BREAD, keeping of COWS, PIGS, BEES, EWES, GOATS, POULTRY, and RABBITS, and relative to other matters deemed useful in the conducting of the Affairs of a Labourer's Family; to which are added, Instructions relative to the selecting, the cutting and the bleaching of the Plants of ENGLISH GRASS and GRAIN, for the purpose of making HATS and BONNETS; and also Instructions for erecting and using Ice-Houses after the Virginian manner. BY WILLIAM COBBETT. SIXTEENTH EDITION. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY ANNE COBBETT, 137, STRAND. 1843.
2feps. Title Page, verso with Camden library stamps. 1pp Contents. [1] 5-181. [1] Engraved picture of 'Ice Houses' 1-12 List of Mrs. Cobbett's Books. 2feps. Fully Bound in modern dark brown calf with blind tooled borders. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and tooling and gilt lettering. Internally very clean with overall slight age browning. Sometime repair to title page with loss of two letters. A scarce copy.
- William Cobbett was born in Farnham, Surrey, on 9 March 1763, the son of a tavern owner. He was taught to read and write by his father, and first worked as a farm labourer. He was an English political pamphleter, farmer and prolific journalist. He thought that the reform of Parliament and the abolition of the rotten boroughs would help cure the poverty of the farm labourers. Cobbett constantly attacked the borough-mongers, sinecurists and "tax-eaters". He opposed the Corn Laws, a tax on imported grain. Through the many apparent inconsistencies in Cobbett's life, one strand continued to run: an ingrained opposition to authority and a suspicion of novelty. Early in his career, he was a "loyalist" supporter of King and Country; later, he joined (and successfully publicised) the radical movement which led to the Reform Bill of 1832 and him winning the parliamentary seat of Oldham. He wrote ten main books of which 'Rural Rides' is perhaps his best known. The first edition of Cottage Economy was published 1816.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10929

Coghan.   Thomas    
THE HAVEN OF HEALTH.
Cheifely gathered for the comfort of Students, and consequently of all those that have a care of their health; amplified upon five words of Hypocrates, written Epid.6. Labor, Cibus, Potie, Somnus, Venus. Hereunto is added, a preservation form the Pestilence, with a short censureof the late sickness in Oxford. By Thomas Coghan, Master of Arts, and Bachelor of Physicke. Ecclesiasicus oap.37.30. By surfeit have many perished: but he that dieteth himselfe prolongeth his life. The fourth Edition, corrected and amended. LONDON, Printed by Anne Griffin, for Roger Ball, and are to be sold at his shop without Temple-barre, at the Golden Anchor next the Nags-head Taverne. 1636.
Small 4to. 2feps with bookplates of Aldenham and W.G. Peene. Title page. [1] 8p Epistle Dedicatorie. 6p To the Reader. 1+2-321. [1] 22p The Table. 2feps. Modern quarter calf with marbled boards, slightly rubbed. Spine with gilt lines and black label with gilt lettering. Title page age darkened. Some soiling and marginal damp-staining. C1 defective with lower outer portion torn. Closed tear to E4. Lower outer corner of H3 torn without loss of text. Final leaf (V4) slightly damp frayed and with two small worm holes affecting lettering of final line of recto. Small neat scattered pencil marginalia throughout especially on the feps.
- The first printed English cookery book, the ‘Boke of Cokery’ produced by Pynson in 1500, was based on 15th-century texts. There was no immediate rush to print cookery books; what did appear were books of advice on diet and health, and on household and estate management, two areas which are often associated with receipts in medieval manuscripts. The best known of the first type are Sir Thomas Elyot’s 'Castel of Health'. 1539, (see item 11253 on this site) and Andrew Boorde’s ‘Dyetary of Health’ circa 1542. The two books are remarkably similar, giving advice on healthy lifestyle based on Galen, although both authors offer comments on what is suitable for Englishmen, thus adapting Galenic theory to their readers. Thomas Coghan, a later rival to these authors, based his 'Haven of Health' (1584) on Elyot, but changed the order of his book to follow Hippocrates rather than Galen, and supplied a much more extensive commentary on a wider variety of herbs than the earlier writer. In these texts one can begin to discern signs of change at the dinner-table, with Elyot’s remarks on the wholesomeness of beef for the healthy Englishman, and with Coghan’s comments on salads, eaten at the beginning of the meal, and on apple tarts, eaten at the end. The second type of publication is best represented by Thomas Tusser’s doggerel writings, ‘A Hundreth Good Pointes of Husbandrie’ 1557, expanded to 'Five Hundreth Points' in 1573. The expanded version gives advice to housewives, stressing their role as providers of care and medicines for the sick, as well as managers of the daily routine of the household. Thomas Coghan advised students to breakfast on light, digestible foods, to avoid overloading the stomach with a variety of meats at one meal, to cut down on salt and to drink milk as a counteractant to melancholy. He recognized that excessive study made students prone to mental breakdown and recommended that they take regular breaks from study to avoid exhausting their mental energy, and that they refresh their minds with recreations such as music or games” (Norman 493). “It is a book of good sense… By the use of ‘one dish onely at one meale, and drinking thereto but small drinke’ he became slender” (Osler 2331). Coghan divided preventative health into five categories: labor or exercise of body and mind, eating, drinking, sleeping and sexual relations. Includes recipes for a variety of healthy drinks, including aqua vitae, rofa solis, cinnamon water, wormwood wine and buttered beer. Norman 493. STC 5481. Lowndes, 487. See Cagle 621-22, Osler 2331-33, Walleriana 2036.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11045

Collingwood. F   and Woolams. J.     - The very scarce 2nd edition.
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. The various Articles in CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. TOGETHER WITH Directions for Baking Breads, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. BESIDES A VARIETY OF USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. The Whole Embellished with The Heads of the Authors, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year, and proper Subjets for the Improvement of the Art of Carving, elegantly engraved on Copper-Plates. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, AND JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand ---- Late from the London Tavern. THE SECOND EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED BY R. NOBLE, FOR J. SCATCHERD, NO. 12, AVE-MARIA-LANE. 1797.
8vo. 1fep. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 4p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month, with each verso blank. (curiously there is a light water stain only on the plates. Not objectionable) (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue. 445-451 Marketing Tables. 1p Advertising. 1fep. Original full dark calf covered boards with blind tooled lines on the boards. The sympathetically re-laid spine has raised bands and gilt lines. With a brown label and gilt lettering. Overall has a nice patina. Besides the light stain on the plates, the text block is very clean.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams had the unique distinction of having their first edition of ‘The Universal Cook’ of 1792, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. The first smart restaurant to open in Paris the same year as ‘The Universal Cook’ was published, was called La Grande Taverne de Londres, after the London Tavern, where John Farley its famous Chef was serving his tenure. Collingwood and Woollams had also had a spell at the London Tavern, so one assumes they were as well known as Farley. This is a nice copy of the second edition printed seven years after the first. The illustration of the two authors as the book frontispiece are quite delicately etched and not as heavy handed as in later editions. With the bookplate of the famous cookery book collector - Lord Westbury, tipped onto the front paste-down.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11131

Collingwood. F   and Woolams. J.     - The very rare first edition.
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light Repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. The various Articles in CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. Together with Directions for Baking Bread, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. Besides a Variety of USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. The Whole Embellished with The Heads of the Authors, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year, and proper Subjets for the Improvement of the Art of Carving, elegantly engraved on fourteen Copper-Plates. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, AND JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand, Late from the London Tavern. LONDON: PRINTED BY R. NOBLE, FOR J. SCATCHERD AND J. WHITAKER, NO. 12, AVE-MARIA-LANE. 1792.
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. 2feps with 2 previous owners signatures. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 2p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month, with each verso blank. (curiously they have been bound in out of monthly order. All are present). (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue of seasonal articles. 445-451 Marketing Tables. 2feps. Original full dark calf covered boards with blind tooled lines on the boards. The spine with blind tooled lines. With a dark red label and gilt lettering. Overall has a nice patina. Besides very light age browning to frontispiece and plates , the text block is very clean. Overall, a nice copy.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams were the Principal cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern on the south side of the Strand, London WC1. Strype the historian informs us, that in 1729 an original tavern called the Crown occupied the same site. The Anchor was added to the name shortly after that date, in honour of St Clements Church nearby; an anchor being the emblem of the patron saint who suffered his martyrdom by being cast into the sea with an anchor tied to his neck. The site began a few doors down Arundel St. and extended to Milford Lane. It had an entrance from the Strand thro’ a narrow courtyard. The tavern was very famous and very well frequented by the rich, famous and important members of English high society. Dr Johnson made it his second home. Taking his daily walks with his friend Boswell past Temple Bar, going westward, the Crown and Anchor was their port of call and also of many of their confreres. It was here that Dr Jonson’s famous spat with Percy took place. The Academy of Music was first started at the Tavern. The house was pulled down in 1790 and rebuilt. A very large banqueting room was erected, measuring 85x36 feet, and when packed could hold 2500 guests. It was first opened on the occasion of a birthday dinner given to Charles James Fox, M.P. and presided over by the Duke of Norfolk. The room was used for fine balls and political meetings of both the Tories and radical Parties; anyone in fact who could pay the high prices. The Tavern became the headquarters of one party or another during the Westminster parliamentary elections. It is recorded that Daniel O’Conner M.P., Brougham Cobbet, Sir Francis Burdett and others, held meetings that always crowded the room. After the 1790 rebuild, the first landlord was a famous, very large obese man; Thomas Simkin. He famously died by leaning on the upstairs banister, and calling down some instructions, the banister gave way under his huge weight and he toppled to his death below. The Tavern had elegant booths opened for their customers at the courses during the racing season and the main fairs. As well as refreshments they also held dances. Sadly, in 1854 the Tavern burned down. Afterwards the Duke of Norfolk built Arundel House on the site and further afield. This great Tavern is the establishment where Collingwood and Woollams established their substantial reputation. They had the unique distinction of having this first edition of 1792; ‘The Universal Cook’, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. This book is a record of professional 18th century English gastronomy, as opposed to the cookery books written for the housewife. As can be read on the title page, it has extensive instructions for all the tasks undertaken in such an important Tavern and its Kitchen. The equally rare second edition was published in 1797 with very little change; see item ref #: 11131. See also, item ref #: 11035 for a rare dinner invitation to the Crown and Anchor Tavern when Collingwood and Woolllams were the head cooks.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11227

Collingwood. F.   and Woolams. J.     - Purchased in India during the British Raj
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. THE VARIOUS ARTICLES IN CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. TOGETHER WITH Directions for Baking Breads, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. BESIDES A VARIETY OF USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. THE WHOLE EMBELLISHED WITH THE HEADS OF THE AUTHORS, BILLS FOR EVERY MONTH OF THE YEAR, AND PROPER SUBJECTS FOR THE IMPROVEMENTS OF THE ART OF CARVING, ELEGANTLY ENGRAVED ON FOURTEEN COPPER-PLATES. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, and JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand ---- Late from the London Tavern. THIRD EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED BY C. WHITTINGHAM, Dean Street, Fetter Lane, FOR J. STACHARD, No. 12, AVE-MARIE-LANE; H.D. SYMONDS AND HURST, PATERNOSTER-ROW; RICHARDSONS, ROYAL EXCHANGE; MARSH AND DUNSFORD, FLEET-STREET; GARNER, WESLEY, AND STARND, STRAND; LAKING, CURZON-STREET; DANGERFIELD, BERKLEY-SQUARE; MILLAR, AND JORDAN HOOKHAM BOND-STREET; KIRBY, OXFORD-STREET; LINDSELL, WIMPOLE-STREET; LLOTD, CAVENDISH-STREET;--1801.
8vo. 2feps. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 4p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month. (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue. 445-451 Marketing Tables. [1] Advertising. 2feps. Half dark brown modern calf with marbled boards and calf corners. The pages very lightly age browned with some manuscript notes. There an interesting manuscript note on the first page of recipes; "Bought this book from Col. David Smothen [?] and gave him 8 rupees for Mrs Smothen".(Probably a frugal mem-sahib selling the book before leaving for England). The whole text block has been trimmed slightly without loss of text. The third appears to be a very scarce edition, as none are cited in the bibliographies. A nice copy.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams had the unique distinction of having their first edition of ‘The Universal Cook’ of 1792, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. The first smart restaurant to open in Paris the same year as ‘The Universal Cook’ was published, was called La Grande Taverne de Londres, after the London Tavern, where John Farley its famous Chef was serving his tenure. Collingwood and Woollams had also had a spell at the London Tavern, so one assumes they were as well known as Farley. In spite of the fame and glory of Collingwood and Woollams’ book being translated into French, the French publisher had qualms. In his introduction, he wrote: “The English must eat well, look at their 'embonpoint!' If occasional recipes seem odd, they will at least, 'cher lecteur,' broaden your experience, acquainting you with ‘le catchup’ and ‘le browning’ which are unknown even to our best chefs.” In this age, with our British chefs feeling a need to bow in humble acknowledgement of the superior French culinary tradition and possible superior expertise (although this has definitely been changing in recent years) one is surprised by the above words of the French publisher. Collingwood and Woollams in turn, inform us grandly in their Preface: ‘We shall not attempt to ransack the annals of Antiquity, with a view to discover what was the food of our first parents in the garden of Eden, or in the manner they performed their culinary operation: It is sufficient for us to know a[t] present, that Cookery is become a Science, that every age has contributed its mite to the improvement of this art, which seems now to have reached a very high degree of perfection.’ Interesting! – I’m sure, Joel Robuchon, Gorden Ramsey, Paul Bocuse, Ferran Adria, Heston Blumenthal, Rick Stien, Alain Ducasse et al, are saying the same thing now, and that the great cooks of two or three generations hence, will express the same sentiments; How things change, but ultimately stay the same!.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10972

Copley.   Esther    
THE COOK'S COMPLETE GUIDE,
ON THE PRINCIPLES OF Frugality, Comfort, and Elegance INCLUDING THE ART OF CARVING, AND THE MOST APPROVED METHOD OF SETTING OUT A TABLE EXPLAINED BY NUMEROUS COPPER-PLATE ENGRAVINGS, INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRESERVING HEALTH, AND ATTAINING OLD AGE; WITH DIRECTIONS FOR BREEDING AND FATTENING ALL SORTS OF POULTRY, AND FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF BEES, RABBITS, PIGS &c. &c. RULES FOR CULTIVATING A GARDEN, AND NUMEROUS USEFUL MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. a line. BY A LADY, AUTHORESS OF "COTTAGE COMFORTS" a line. London: GEORGE VIRTUE, 26, IVY LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW.
FIRST EDITION. n/d Circa 1827. Thick 8vo. 222 x 148 x 50mm. 2 feps. 1p with ink Inscription from an aunt dated 1843. Frontispiece of a lady displaying meat, fish and vegetables. An first elaborate Title Page (The New London Cookery by a Lady). [1] Title Page. [1] 2p Contents. (1)-iv Preface. (3)4 - 812. 813 Addenda. (1)815 - 838 Index. 1fep. 5 Engraved plates in Text. Title page slightly age browned. Both title pages with small smudge not affecting text. Text Block very clean. Nicely bound with 1/4 light tan calf. Spine with raised bands and gilt lines. Dark brown label with gilt lettering. Boards with marbled paper and tan calf corners. Overall well preserved.
- This is a very comprehensive thick book with a huge 38 page Index. It is one of the many thick books of the time, all produced with similar layouts and abundant details. When they are all seen together, one is struck by how Beeton's Household Management of 1861, although some-what similar to the others, broke the mould with colour plates and better designed formatting. Hence its huge popularity. This book's title page proclaims the un-named Authoress (Esther Copley) to be the same as for the relatively small 'Cottage Comforts' (see item 10930 above). She also wrote one other small book titled 'Cottage Cookery' (see item 11016 below). Published and printed by Gorge Virtue this was a contracted work "by a Lady" that was subtly attributed to Copley to increase sales. We can be sure of this because the two "Cottage" books previously mentioned are clearly declared on the title pages as written by her. I'm sure she would wish the attribution of this book to her was also stated just as clearly.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11258