Marshall   Agnes Bertha     - with the four coloured plates.
THE BOOK OF ICES.
[FOURTEENTH THOUSAND.] INCLUDING CREAM AND WATER ICES, SORBETS, MOUSSES, ICED SOUFFLES, AND VARIOUS ICED DISHES, WITH NAMES IN FRENCH AND ENGLISH, AND VARIOUS COLOURED DESIGNES FOR ICES. BY A.B. MARSHALL. (Copyright.) REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION. London: MARSHALL’S SCHOOL OF COOKERY, 32, MORTIMER STREET. SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO., LIMITED, 4, STATIONERS’-HALL, COURT. [Price Half-a-Crown nett.]
180 x 120mm. n/d. Front paste-down and end-paper with lovely advertisements. Half-title. On verso advertisement for all Marshall’s books. [1] Frontispiece – one of the four coloured plates. Title page with tissue guard. [1] (1)vi-vii Contents. [1] (1)2-52. (1)54-76 Advertisements featuring wonderful illustrated drawings of Marshall’s ice-moulds, ice-pots and machines. (1)78-79 Index. On verso advertisement for all Marshall’s dry goods. [1] End-paper and paste-down with lovely advertisements. Original bright blue cloth cover with blind tolled lines and bright gilt writing. Internally very clean with the four coloured plates with tissue guards. A lovely copy of this very scarce much sought after thin volume. Earlier copies were published without the plates and had limited advertisements.
- Mrs. Agnes Bertha Marshall (born Walthamstow, Essex 1855 – died Brighton 1905) was a celebrity cook similar to today's television stars who hold cookery demonstrations and write books. Had there been television in her day, Mrs. Marshall would have without question, been a cookery pundit on the small screen. She was very well informed and always keen to adopt new technology. Agnes Marshall wrote four books: ‘The Book of Ices’ 1885; ‘Mrs. A.B. Marshall's Book of Cookery’ 1888; ‘Mrs. A.B. Marshall's Larger Cookery Book of Extra Recipes’ 1891; ‘Fancy Ices’ 1894; These are considered to be some of the finest books of their type ever written, especially those on ices, of which Mrs. Marshall was the Queen. Her recipes are clear, accurate, and well illustrated. She was very industrious, owning and running a domestic staff agency business, selling domestic and cooking equipment, and running a successful school of cookery in Welbeck St, London. She campaigned vigorously for better standards of food hygiene. Agnes toured extensively, lecturing and demonstrating her techniques to huge audiences. She even took her lectures to the United States in the summer of 1888. Two years earlier in 1886 she had started a magazine called "The Table". Mrs. Marshall can be credited with the invention of the ice cream edible cone, mentioned in her 1888 cookery book, the recipe being "cornets with cream". This predates American claims to the invention in 1904. There are no known earlier references to the edible ice cream cone, which nowadays we all take for granted. Her books stimulated demand for imported Norwegian ice, which was supplied from the building that is now the London Canal Museum. An exhibition at Syon House (1998) and at London Canal Museum (1999) told the story of her amazing life. Marshall has been neglected by historians, and is not famous today, unlike Mrs. Beeton, whose work benefited from commercial promotion long after her death. In contrast Mrs. Marshall's family did not make a long-term success of her business. Sadly, Agnes Marshall’s life ended too early. She died at age of forty nine recovering from injuries sustained from a riding accident. Marshall’s newspaper, company, and school survived her well into the twentieth century and her influence and opinions endured even longer.

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ref number: 11135

Mason.   Charlotte    
The Ladys Assistant
For Regulating and Supplying her Table, Being a Complete System Of Cookery Containing One Hundred and Fifty select Bills of Fare, properly disposed for Family Dinners Of Five Dishes, to Courses Of Eleven and Fifteen; With Upwards Of Fifty Bills of Fare for Suppers, from Five Dishes to Nineteen; And Several Deserts: Including Likewise, The fullest and choicest Receipts of various Kinds, With Full Directions for preparing them in the most approved Manner, from which a continual Change may be made, as wanted, in the several Bills of Fare: Published from the Manuscript Collection of Mrs. Charlotte Mason, A professed Housekeeper, who had upwards of Thirty Years Experience in Families of the first fashion. The Third Edition. "The most refin'd understanding and the most exalted sentiments do not place a " woman above the little duties of life." Mrs. Griffith. London; Printed for J. Walter Homer's- Head, Charing- Cross. M.DCC.LXXVII
8vo. 2fep with manuscript signature of Catharine Driffield 1701. Title Page. [1] 2pp. Introduction to First Edition and Adverts to the second edition. [1]+1-123 Bills of fare. [1] 125-428. 429-436 List of seasonal foods. 21pp Index. 1pp Adverts. 2feps. Light tan original calf boards with nice patina. New tan spine with blind and gilt tooling, and gilt lines, and red and green labels with gilt lettering. Minor foxing on last few leaves of index and the end papers. Very clean internally.
- An excellent copy. 123 Bills of fare according to the rules of polite society are the main subject of The Lady’s Assistant: its first 124 pages contain text-only arrangements for between five and nineteen dishes as well as simple cold suppers. The subsequent wealth of recipes, including some relating to New England cooking, are interspersed with pithy information about the resources required by a good cook including an entire section on spices, their origins and uses, and condiments (pp. 290-92). The work closes with lists of seasonal fruit, vegetables and meat for all months of the year, and an extensive index. The Lady’s Assistant was first published in 1773. Little is known about the author, Mrs. Charlotte Mason, whose active period ended with the eighth, i.e. final contemporary edition of this book in ca. 1800: in the subtitle, Mason declares herself ‘a professed housekeeper, who had upwards of thirty years experience in families of the first fashion’, and references her manuscript collection as a source for the material published in this book. The text is preceded by the introduction to the first edition, the ‘Advertisement to the Second Edition’ – which notes that the text has been revised and enlarged, with ‘a full, select, and really useful collection of receipts and amendments, which makes The Lady’s Assistant [...] the most complete book of cookery hitherto extant’ – and the ‘Note to this Edition’, which states that, ‘the continued quick sale of the last corrected edition of this publication [...] ascertains the merits of the book’. ESTC N12254; Maclean, p. 95. Simon, BG 1013.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10910

Massialot.   Francois     - The very rare 1st English edition.
THe Court and Country Cook:
GIVING New and Plain Directions How to Order all manner of ENTERTAINMENTS, And the best sort of the Most exquisite a-la-mode Ragoo's Yogether with NEW INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONFECTIONERS: SHEWING How to Preserve all sorts of Fruits, as well dry as liquid: Also, How to make divers Sugar-works, and other fine Pieces of Curiosity; How to set out a Desert, or Banquet of Sweet-meats to the best advantage; And, How to prepare several sorts of Liquors, that are proper for every Season of the Year. A WORK more especially necessary for Stewards, Clerks of the Kitchen, Confectioners, Butlers and other Officers, and also of great use in private Families. Faithfully translated out of French into English by J.K. London: Printed by W.Onley, for A. and J.Churchill, at the Black Swan in Pater-noster-row, and M.Gillyflower in Westminster-hall. 1702.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 12mo. 1fep. Title page with double lined border. [1] 5p Preface. 3p Table of Entertainments. 7p A Table. 14p A General Table. [1] 4p Preface to the Reader. 2p Contents of instructions to Confectioners. 1p Contents of instructions for Liquors. 8p A Table. [1] 8 Engraved plates of set tables. 1-276. 1-130 New Instructions for Confectioners (with 2 in-text engravings on P126 & 128). 1-20 New Instructions for Liquors. 2feps. Original full dark calf boards with fillet design very slightly rubbed on corners. Sympathetically re-backed with dark brown calf, gilt lines with brown label with gilt writing. In good condition with some worming up to the end of the tables. Overall a good copy of the very rare first edition.
- This is a translation into English of Massialot’s two famous books. Firstly his best; 'Nouveau cuisinier royal et bourgeois' first appeared in French, anonymously, as a single volume in 1691, and was expanded to two in 1712, then three volumes in a revised edition of 1733-34. His lesser cookbook, 'Nouvelle instruction pour les confitures', also appeared anonymously in French, in 1692. In an article online by Douglas Muster titled ‘The Origins and History of Meringue’, he informs – “François Massialot, the first chef of Louis XIV (1638 - 1715), published the recipe for a beaten and baked egg white and sugar confection he called meringue in a cook book published in 1692. In his book, Massialot dubs, what he calls “... a little sugar-work, very pretty and very easy ... can be made in a moment ...”. As Massialot’s book was translated and published into English by 1702, strangely, the citation in the Oxford English Dictionary for the first use of the term meringue in English is 1706. Although Massialot’s recipe for a baked beaten egg white and sugar confection was not the earliest, it appears it is embedded firmly in French and English and phonetic variations in other languages; Spain: merengue. Germany: meringe. Italy: meringa” - 8th century. This translation of Massialot's important books is among the scarcest and hardest to find. There are no translated copies recorded in any of the great collections that have come up for auction.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11120

MASSIALOT.   FRANCOIS     - With the bookplate of Anton Mosimann
NOUVELLE INSTRUCTION POUR LES CONFITURES,
LES LIQUEURS, ET LES FRUITS; Ou l’on apprend a’ confire toutes; sortes de Fruits, tant secs que liquides; & divers ouvrages de Sucre qui sont du fait des Officiers & Confiseurs; avec la maniere de bien ordonner un Fruit. Suit du Nouveau Cuisinier Royal & Bourgeois, egalement utile aux Maitres d’Hotels & dans les Familles, pour scavoir ce qu’on sert de plus a’la mode dans les Repas. NOUVELLE EDITION. Revue, corrigee, & beaucoup augmentee, Avec de nouveaux Desseins de Tables. (Printer’s device) Du Fonds de Cl. Prudhomme. A PARIS, AUPALAIS, Chez SAUGRAIN Fils, Grand’ Salle, du cote’ de la Cour des Aydes, a’la Providence. M.DCC.XL. AVEC PRIVILEGE DU ROY. (With some Ms. writing not affecting the printed text).
12mo. Marbled paste-down and end-paper. [1] 1fep. Title page. [1] 6pp Preface. 4pp Table des Chapitures. 4pp Approbation. (1)2-518. 36pp Table des Matieres. 6pp Catalogue des Livres. Fep possibly lacking. Marbled paste-down and end-paper. With two folding plates of table settings with sweets displayed. Contemporary full dark brown speckled calf with raised bands and elaborate French gilt tooling in the compartments. With a black label with gilt border and writing. The corners of the boards slightly rubbed. With a nice patina. Internally very clean. A nice copy.
- François Massialot, born in Limoges, 1660, died in Paris, 1733. He was a French chef who served as chef de cuisine (officier de bouche) to various illustrious personages, including Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, the brother of Louis XIV, and his son Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, who was first duc de Chartres then the Regent, as well as the duc d'Aumont, the Cardinal d’Estrées, and the marquis de Louvois. His ‘Nouveau Cuisinier Royal et Bourgeois’ first appeared, anonymously, as a single volume in 1691. His other cookbook, ‘Nouvelle Instruction pour les Confitures, les Liqueurs et les Fruits’ appeared, also anonymously, in 1692, and reprinted several times in the eighteenth century. Massialot describes himself in his preface as "a cook who dares to qualify himself royal",... and it is not without cause, for the meals which he describes..."have all been served at court or in the houses of princes, and of people of the first rank." An innovation in Massialot's book was the alphabetical listing of recipes, a step toward the first culinary dictionary. Meringues make their first appearance under their familiar name with Massialot, who is also credited with Crême Brulée, in which the sugar topping was melted and burnt with a special dedicated red-hot fire iron. Another first with Massialot is two recipes in which chocolate is an ingredient: in a sauce for wigeon and in a sweet custard. Until then, chocolate was consumed solely as a drink. Massialot's works were translated into English as ‘The Court and Country Cook' 1702, and were often reprinted.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11103

May.   Robert     - An important 17th century cookery book
THe Accomplisht Cook,
OR THE Art and Mystery OF COOKERY Wherein the whole ART is revealed in a more easie and perfect Method, than hath been publisht in any language. Expert and ready Ways for the Dressing of all sorts of FLESH, FOWL, and FISH, with variety of SAUCES proper for each of them; and how to raise all manner of Pastes; the best Directions for all sorts of Kickshaws, also the Terms of CARVING and SEWING. An exact of all Dishes for all Seasons of the Year, with other Al-a-Mode Curiosities. The Fourth Edition, with large Additions throughout the whole work: besides two hundred Figures of several Forms for all manner of bak'd Meats, (either Flesh or Fish) as Pyes, Tarts, Custards, Cheesecakes and Florentines, placed in Tables, and directed to the Pages yhey pertain to. Approved by the Fifty Five years Experience and Industry of ROBERT MAY, in his Attendance of several parsons of great Honour. London, Printed for Obadiah Blagrave at the Bear in St. Pauls Church-Yard, near the Little North Door. 1678.
8vo. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece. Title page with single line border. 2pp. The Epistle Dedicatory. 4pp. The Preface. 3pp. Authors Life. 5pp. Triumphs and Trophies. 8pp. Of Carving and Sewing. 6pp. Bills of Fare. 1-461. 10pp. The Table. 1p. Books Printed. 1fep. The four plates are present; 2 have been expertly repaired without loss but with some browning at the folds. Internally very clean with numerous woodcut illustrations in the text. Contemporary full dark brown calf boards with nice patina. Sometime very sympathetically re-backed spine with raised bands, blind tooling and gilt lettering. A very nice copy and extremely scarce in the complete state.
- Other Editions are; 1660 (1st) 1665 (2nd) 1671 (3rd) of which there are 2 imprints. 1678 (3rd & 4th) 1685 (5th) As a Frontis there is a portrait of May with 'AEatis Suae 71, 1660' in the background and beneath are the lines "What! wouldst thou view but in one face -- all hospitalitie the race -- of those for the Gusto stand, -- whose tables a whole Ark comand -- of Nature's plentie, wouldst thou see -- this sight, peruse May's booke, tis hee. -- Ja. Parry. For Nathaniell Brooke, at the Angell in Cornhill: There are two poems at the beginning in May's honour, and a story of his life which mentions that he was the son of a cook and he was trained in France. This training accounts for his giving nine recipes for preparing snails and one for baking Frogs. In the Preface May says that "God and my own conscience would not permit me to bury these my experiences in the Grave" and that 'The Queens Closet Opened' was the only book comparable to his own. May's "Accomplisht Cook' is one of the great 17th century cookery books and one of the cornerstones of a good comprehensive cookery book collection. It is the record of a professional cook of that time. It is a well laid out book covering all aspects of the contemporary kitchen. In some editions there are two very large plates which unfold. This edition (and most others I have seen) has the two large plates separated into four.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10965

Menon.   Louis Francois Henri de     - In superb condition - as new.
The French Family Cook
BEING A complete System of French Cookery. Adapted to the Tables not only of the Opulent, but of Persons of moderate Fortune and Condition. CONTAINING Directions for choosing, dressing, and serving up all Sorts of Butcher Meat, Poultry, &c. The different Modes of making all kinds of Soups, Ragouts, Fricandeaus, Creams, Ratasias, Compots, Preserves, &c.&c. as well as a great Variety of cheap and elegant Side Dishes, calculated to grace a Table at a small Expence. Neccesary for Housekeepers, Butlers, Cooks, and all who are concerned in the Superintendence of a Family. TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH. LONDON: Printed for J. BELL, No. 148, Oxford Street, nearly opposite New Bond Street. M.DCC.XCIII.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION 1793. 8vo. 2feps. Title Page. [1] 6pp Bills of Fare. (1)iv-xxiv Contents. (1)2-342. 2pp Advertisements. Fully bound in modern mid-brown calf, with 18th century style blind tooled panelled fillet on the boards with blind tooled line borders. Spine with raised bands and gilt lines, red label with gilt lettering. Internally extremely clean, as new. A rare item especially in this immaculate condition.
- Although no author is named on the title page, this is the first English translation of Menon's - La Cuisiniere Bourgeoise, originally written in French, and published in Paris, 1746. Maclean notes a 4th edition of 1796 with an altered main title, although sub-titles unchanged. Menon's books excite a lot of interest but nothing was known of him, till very recently; Sophie of Sophie Schneideman Rare Books had an early two volume set of 'La Cuisiniere Bourgeoise' dated 1752. This set was the author’s own copy, signed on the first page. It was the copy from the Chateau de Villiers library according to small pen inscriptions on each title and tiny stamps on the first blanks. The first blank of the first volume bears the remarkable history of the book, written in ink in 1875. The story it relates is that the first owner of the book was Mrs. Menon. It next passed to Margueritte Menon, her daughter, who was married to Claude Dodant. The next recepient of the set was Anne Dodant, wife of Henri de Villemenard. Their son Charles de Villemenard next owned it, there-after going to to Marie de Villemenard and finally to the author of the note, Villiers. The note is initialed and dated. Interesting; this is now the most up-to-date information on Menon. Perhaps with this little bit, further relevant information can be garnered in the future. His books in French and English are much sought after and constitute an important addition to any cookery book collection.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10940

Middleton.   John     - With a distinquished provenance
Five Hundred New Receipts
IN COOKERY, CONFECTIONARY, PASTRY, PRESERVING, CONSERVING, PICKLING; AND THE Several Branches of these ARTS necessary to be known by all good HOUSEWIVES. By JOHN MIDDLETON, Cook to his Grace the late Duke of Bolton. Revised and Recommended by Mr. HENRY HOWARD. LONDON: Printed for THO. ASTLEY, at the Rose against the North Door of St. Paul's. M DCC XXXIV.
FIRST & SOLE EDITION OF 1734. 8vo. Title Page. (i-iv) (1-249) 8pp 'Index' 1p 'Advertisement' Fully bound in contemporary light brown calf (sometime re-laid) with gilt lined borders. Spine with raised bands and faded gilt lines and a green label wit gilt lettering. Internally very clean - almost as new. The paper is unusually thick. With three bookplates, one of which is Claudia Q. Murphy's. A very scarce item.
- There appears to be two types of first issues. This one which is the large and thick papered version. A thinner paper issue also exists. The title page is featured in MacLean's 'Catalogue of Household and Cookery Books 1701-1800' She states that it is her favourite eighteenth century cookery book title page, among all others. It is very distinctly laid out with the printer 'Thomas Astley's' emblem of a Rose featured predominately. (The rose could also be mistaken for an artichoke!) The whole is surrounded by a two line border. This copy was sold, April 19th. 1926, at the auction rooms of Anderson Galleries, New York City, from Claudia Q. Murphy's cookery book collection. It went for $2.50. The sale also featured many other rare items for around the same prices. How one wishes 'time travel' was possible.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10949

Moffet (Muffett).   Thomas     - Exceptionally clean.
Healths Improvement;
OR, Rules Comprizing and discovering The Nature, Method, and Manner of Preparing all sorts of FOOD Used in this NATION. (A single flat line) Wriiten by that ever Famous THOMAS MUFFETT, Doctor in PHYSICK: (A single flat line) Corrected and Enlarged BY CHRISTOFER BENNET, Doctor in Physick, and Fellow of the College of Physicians in London. (A single flat line) LONDON, Printed by Tho: Newcomb for Samuel Thomson, at the sign of the white Horse in Pauls Churchyard, 1655.
FIRST EDITION. 4to. 190 x 146 mm. 1fep. Title page. [2] Imprimatur page. (1)2-8 The Table. 2pages To the Reader. 1-296. 1 fep. Full dark brown sheep. Blind tooling to covers and spine. Gilt lettering and red leather label with gilt lines. A very light small water stain on upper corner of the title page and next four pages, not affecting text, otherwise, almost as new. Some occasional marginalia in a neat hand. Many bibliographical sources printed in margins. An exceptionally nice clean copy of a very scarce book.
- There exists a varied number of ways that Muffett (as spelled in this edition) is written. Cagle shows at least six ways. He also states Moffett is preferred by NUC, Mouffet by BMC, and Muffett by BNC. For the sake of filing them together on this site, I have used the later 'Moffet'. In an interesting historical thesis featuring Thomas Muffett, written and posted online by Christopher A. DeAngelo of Haverford College, PA, USA, who starts his dissertation with the famous poem:- “Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet / Eating her curds and whey / Along came a big spider / And sat down beside her / And frightened Miss Muffet away!”. Mr DeAngelo further states; "Thomas Muffet, the 16th century English natural philosopher, is best known today for the above nursery rhyme. He apparently wrote it about his daughter. Some people have even suggested that the poem refers to Muffet’s experiments on his daughter with spiders, which led to her being deathly afraid of them for the rest of her life. Despite the wide acceptance of these claims, there is no historical evidence to support any of them. Whether or not Muffett had anything to do with the actual writing of the poem, it is undeniably linked to him. The poem includes two concrete allusions to Muffett’s work. The spider is a direct reference to Muffett’s ‘Theatrum Insectorum’, in which the largest section deals with the classification of spiders. The curds and whey come straight out of ‘Healths Improvement’, where Muffett named curds and whey (both wheat products) as essential to a good diet". Thomas Moffett was born in 1553 and died in 1604, so it must be assumed that the Christofer Bennet mentioned in the title page of ‘Healths Improvement’ who corrected and enlarged the book, was the first one to edit Muffett’s manuscript notes. One must then wonder how much he added and what exactly is Muffett’s original work. Whatever the truth, this is a very interesting work.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11232

Moffet.   Thomas     - the very rare second ed.
Health's Improvement:
OR, RULES Comprizing and Discovering the Nature, Method and Manner Of PREPARING all sorts of FOODS Used in this Nation. Written by that ever famous THOMAS MOFFET, Doctor in Physick. Corrected and Enlarged by Christopher Bennet, Doctor in Physick, and Fellow of the College of Physicians in London. To which is now prefix'd A short View of the Author's Life and Writings, by Mr. Oldys. AND An Introduction, by R.James, M.D. LONDON: Printed for T.Osborne in Gray's-Inn MDCCXLVI.
12mo. 1fep. Title page. On verso Imprimatur. 2p Epistle. 2p The Table. (1)viii-xxxii The writings of Dr Moffet. (1)2-66 Introduction. (1)68-398. 1fep. Full contemporary dark brown calf with nice patina. Sometime sympathetically relaid spine in dark calf with blind tooled lines and dark red label with faded gilt lettering. Slightly age browned throughout but overall a very nice copy of the second edition of 1746.
- Very unusually, this second edition is printed ninety one years after the first edition of 1655. Thomas Moffet, (born 1553, died 5 June 1604), was an English naturalist and physician. He is best known for his Puritan beliefs, his study of insects in regards to medicine (particularly spiders), his support of the Paracelsian system of medicine, and his emphasis on the importance of experience over reputation in the field of medicine. Muffet was born to Thomas Moffet in Shoreditch, London. From the ages 8 to 16 years, he attended the Merchant Taylors' School. The following year, in May 1569, he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, however he only stayed there for two and a half years. In October of 1572, he transferred to Gonville Hall. He continued his education there until his graduation the following year, in 1573, when he received his Bachelor Degree. Afterward, Muffet studied medicine with Thomas Lorkin and John Caius. Three years later, he began his Master's program at Trinity College, at which point he was expelled from Gonville Hall. In Spring 1578 Muffet boarded with Felix Platter, chief physician of Basel, where he adopted the Paracelsian system of Medicine. In 1579, he was awarded his MD from Basel with a censored version of his thesis, entitled 'De Amodinis Medicamentis' (1578). The year after receiving his MD, in 1580, Muffet studied silkworm anatomy in Italy before finally returning to England. That December, he married his first wife, Jane, in St. Mary Colechurch, London. Two years later, he was recognized as a qualified physician by the College of Physicians in London. This was not expected, as Muffet was a strong advocate for the Paracelsian system of medicine, which was not widely respected by the medical community. Two years later, in 1584, Muffet finished his 'De jure et praestantia chemicorum medicamentorum'. This document is said to have anticipated Bacon's emphasis on the advancement of learning. That same year, Muffet wrote a letter attacking the London College of Physicians for Papist influences through the lens of his own Puritan beliefs. The following year, however, he was admitted to the College of Physicians, becoming a fellow in February 1588. Later that same year he published his 'Nosomantica Hippocratea' advocating support for the work and writings of Hippocrates. Nine years later in October 1597, Muffet was elected as a member of Parliament for Wilton. Three years later in 1600, Muffet's wife, Jane, died. He married Catherine Brown that same year. Four years later on June 5, 1604, Thomas Muffet died at the Bulbridge Farm, in Wilton, Wiltshire. His work in nutrition was collected in his book 'Health's Improvement' which was designed more for the layman than for contemporary medical professionals. This work is the first with a list of British wildfowl, recognizing for the first time the migratory habits of many of them. This book was first published in 1655 even later than 'Theatrum Insectorum'. Robert Lovell's 'Panzoologia' is supposedly indebted to Muffet's descriptions of birds from 'Health's Improvement' and of insects from 'Theatrum Insectorum'. This is somewhat highlighted in the first recipe on page 245; Moffet describes being shown a dead flying fish from the West-Indies by Sir Francis Drake. Drake describes their taste as good and tender similar to herrings. Further in page 245 Lobsters are described as Marine Locusts. An unusual and interesting book of the time about all kinds of animals, fish and foodstuffs.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11162

Mollard.   John    
The Art of Cookery
MADE EASY AND REFINED; COMPRISING AMPLE DIRECTIONS FOR PREPARING EVERY ARTICLE REQUISITE FOR FURNISHING THE TABLES OF THE NOBLEMAN, GENTLEMAN, AND TRADESMAN. BY JOHN MOLLARD. THIRD EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR; AND SOLD BY HIM, No 42, DOVER-STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS; AND J. RIDGWAY, No 170, PICCADILLY. 1807. Price 7s. 6d. T. Gillet Printer, Wild Court, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
12mo. 3feps. Title page. [1] 1p Dedication to Proprietor of The London Tavern. [1] (1)vi-viii. 16p Contents. 12 Plates of Monthly Table Settings. (1)2-211. [1] 3feps. Modern dark brown half calf with marbled boards. Mild foxing throughout.
- This 1807, 3rd edition of John Mollard's 'Art of Cookery' is an interesting read. First published in 1801 and running to five editions by 1836 it gives many unusual recipes. Here from the 1836 edition is Mollard's and the English take on ‘pilaf’ (or pillaw or pilau), -- 'Pilau Of Rice: Wash, pick, and boil a pound of rice in plenty of water till half done, with a dozen of whole cardamom seeds; then drain it, pick out the seeds, and put the rice into a stewpan, with three quarters of a pound of fresh butter and some pounded mace, and salt. Cut a loin of house lamb, or some fresh pork, into small pieces; put them into a frying-pan, add a small quantity of cinnamon, cloves, cummin and cardamum seeds pounded and sifted, with a bit of butter and some Cayenne pepper, and fry the meat till half done. Then add two bay leaves, and four good sized onions sliced, to a pint and a half of veal broth; boil them till tender and rub them through a tamis cloth or sieve. Then boil the liquor over a fire till reduced to half a pint, and add it to the fried meat and spices, together with some peeled button onions boiled. Place some of the rice at the bottom of another stewpan, then a layer of meat and onions on the rice, and so on alternately till the whole is put in. Cover the pan close, set it in a moderately heated oven for two hours and a half, and when to be served, turn the rice out carefully on a dish'. In preparation, because of the addition of meat, this is more of a Briyani than a Pilau. One wonders how separate the rice grains will be after 2 1/2 hours in the oven. Mollard's recipe for Twelfth Cake is the earliest known, and makes a large yeast-leavened bun, more like a stollen than a rich English fruit cake of the kind we now associate with Christmas. Cakes of this kind were usually baked in wooden hoops, or garths. Twelfth cakes were iced with almond paste or sugar icing and ornamented with sugar-paste crowns and/or small sugar or wax sculptures of Twelfth Day characters. It is fascinating that there is not a single mention of vanilla, chocolate, or tomatoes in over 210 pages: sweets are all based on custard or fruit, and the ketchups are made from mushrooms or walnuts. With the three quarters of a pound of butter to a pound of rice required for the Pilau above, one assumes in the guests - bull-like constitutions. Truly the cooking of a different age.!

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11062