Tryon.   Thomas     - Very rare.
The Way to HEALTH, LONG Life and Happiness;
Or,A Discourse of TEMPERANCE, And the Particular Nature of all Things requisite for the Life of Man; As, All sorts of Meats, Drinks, Air, Exercise, &c. with special Directions how to use each of them to the best Advantage of the BODY and MIND. Shewing form the ground of Nature, Treatise of most sorts of ENGLISH HERBS, With several other remarkable and most useful Observa-tions, very necessary for all Families. The whole Trea-tise displaying the most hidden secrets of Philosophy, and made easie and familiar to the meanest Capacities, by various Examples and Demonstrances.The like never before Published. Communicated to the World for a general Good, By THOMAS TRYON, Student in PHYSICK. The Second Edition, with Amendments. LONDON; Printed by H.C. for R. Baldwin, near the Ox-ford-Arms in Warwick-Lane, 1691.
8vo. Title Page. 4pp To the Reader. 8pp The Contents. 1-500. [2] 1-18. Pages lightly age browned though-out. Contemporary dark brown calf boards with nice patina. Spine relaid in sympathetic dark brown calf with blind tooled lines with a dark brown label with gilt lettering. Overall a nice copy of a rare item.
- Thomas Tryon (1634-1703) English humanitarian, spent his youth as shepherd and a hatter. He had little schooling but went on to write many books on vegetarianism, health, wealth, slavery, education etc. He lived a very ascetic life even though married, eventually becoming a prosperous merchant. 'The Way to Health' became his best known book and after publication he toured and lectured on it in the United States. The book much impressed Benjamin Franklin, who followed some of its tenets and often quoted from it. A supplement to this book called 'The Good Houswife Made A Doctor' was published after the publication of the first edition of 1683.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10963

Ude.   Louis Eustache     - A nice copy in the original state.
The French Cook.
A SYSTEM OF FASHIONABLE AND ECONOMICAL COOKERY, FOR THE USE OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. "True taste is an excellent economist." - Rogers. BY LOUIS EUSTACHE UDE. CI-DEVANT COOK TO LOUIS XVI. AND THE EARL OF SEFTON, AND LATE STEWARD TO HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF YORK. NINTH EDITION, ENLARGED. LONDON W.H. AINSWORTH, 23, OLD BOND-STREET; SOLD ALSO BY HURST AND CO., ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD; SHERWOOD AND CO., PA-TERNOSTER-ROW; SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, STATIONERS-HALL-COURT; J. ANDREWS, NEW BOND-STREET; AND W. SAMS, ST JAMES'S-STREET; WILSON AND SONS, YORK; H. MOZELY, DERBY; W. AND W. CLARKE, MANCHESTER; G. AND J. ROBINSON, LIVERPOOL; OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH; AND WESTLEY AND TYRRELL, DUBLIN. 1827.
210x130 mm. 12p Advertisments. 1fep. (1)Frontispiece portrait of Ude. (drawn from life by Albert Hoffay). Title page. [1] (1)4 Reviews of Ude's book. (1)vi-xxiv Preface. xxv-xxxviii Advice to Cooks. Eight plates numbered 1-8. (1)2-480. (1)482-496 INDEX. 4p Advertisements (2 pages are an Advertisement of Jarrin's 'Italian Confectioner'). 1fep. Original slightly soiled blue cardboard boards and browned paper spine with printed label. Original untrimmed wide margined pages. Feps and frontis very lightly browned, but internally quite clean and bright. The spine is split but still holding. The back board is almost loose but holding. Housed in a beautiful clam-shell case with modern dark brown half calf and marbled boards. Raised bands to spine with gilt dentelles in the compartments. With a red label with gilt lettering. Overall a very nice copy in its original state. Hence the clam-shell box.
- The vain and extravagant Louis Eustache Ude – born in France circa 1769 died 10th April, 1846. He published in 1813, his extravagant cookbook – ‘The French Cook’. Eustache's career in the Kitchen started with his father who had worked in the kitchens of Louis XVI, where he also got Eustache work as an apprentice.". Ude also worked for Napoleon's mother for 2 years. After arriving in England, he first worked for William Philip Molyneux, the 2nd Earl of Sefton at Croxteth Hall. He stayed in service to the Earl, a well-known gourmet, for almost 20 years. Next he worked for the Duke of York, George III's second son. After the Duke's passing, Ude was taken on as Maitre d’ Hotel at Crockford's famous gaming club for a starting salary of 1200 pounds a year. The owner and founder, William Crockford, had a very interesting and colourful past. Online information has him as a fishmonger in Fleet Street with a sideline in bookmaking and such small-scale swindles as the three-card trick. He mastered whist, piquet, and cribbage, which consequentially made him rich. He also backed horses, and by 1809 he was a familiar figure at the races, which also brought into contact with the rich and famous. In 1816 he bought a quarter-share in a gambling tavern in St. Jame's. But Crockford realized that this tavern could only have a limited success. He knew that the most popular clubs were so because they were selective, and that if he wanted to compete with them he would have to plan on a much grander scale, and go all out to get the top people as members. So after winning a large sum of money (£100,000, according to one story) either at cards or just by running the gambling establishment, he built in 1827 a luxuriously decorated gambling house at 50 St. James's Street in London, also buying four adjoining houses around the corner. To ensure its social exclusiveness, he organized the place as a club with a regular membership. Crockford's Club, as it was called, quickly became the rage; almost every English celebrity from the Duke of Wellington on down hastened to become a member, as did many ambassadors and other distinguished foreigners. Into this refined atmosphere Ude was brought as maitre'd of the club's exquisite restaurant, where he stayed until 1839. His reputation was made. He offered the best food and the best wines, all provided gratis to the clients. Ude was eventually earning a salary of £4000 annually for his services – (about £400,000 in 2012). On quitting Crockfords (ironically in a dispute over his pay) he was succeeded by the equally famous chef Charles Elme Francatelli. Gambling houses were illegal at this time. Crockford was regularly charged with operating an illegal club but due to his protection in high circles he was never convicted. As a result of these and other investigations in 1844 by a Parliamentary Select Committee, the Gaming Act 1845 came into being, the principle provision of which was to deem a wager unenforceable as a legal contract. This remained in force until 1 September 2007. Crockford made a series of very poor investments and died on 24 May 1844 leaving little of his considerable fortune to his wife Sarah. The fortunes of Crockfords Club also went downhill immediately after his death; the building went through several hands before emerging with a cleansed reputation as the Devonshire Club. Ude’s vanity was so well known he may have been tickled to know that Mrs Beeton (who in her famous book, tried to offer cost effective recipes put together by over 2000 recipe researcher’s) offered only one recipe herself – Ude’s wildly expensive Turtle Soup recipe. It is assumed that the first recipe for soufflé appeared in Vincent La Chapelle’s book ‘Le Cuisinier Moderne, 1742. Actually the word soufflé first appeared in English in Ude’s ‘The French Cook’ 1813. The PRB&M Co. informs us - "Byron swiped the names of many of Ude's dishes for use in canto 15, stanzas 62–74 of “Don Juan,” and indeed two of Ude's suggested course progressions for stanza 63 (see p. 426)" - Fascinating ! He was buried at General Cemetery of All Souls, Kensal Green amongst princes and paupers, the great and the good, the famous and the infamous with over 1500 notable personalities -- including over 550 with entries in the Dictionary of National Biography as well as his great compatriot Alexis Soyer. No doubt he would feel at home.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11055

Venner.   Tho.    
VIA RECTA AD Vitam Longam.
OR, A Treatise wherein the right way and best manner of living for attaining to a long and healfull life, is clearly demonstrated and punctually applied to every age and constitution of body. Much nore enlarged than the former Impressions. By THO. VENNER Doctor of Physick in Bathe. Whereunto is annexed by the fame Author, A very necessary, and compendius Treatise of the famous Baths of BATHE. WITH A Censure of the Medicinall faculties of the Water of St. Vincents- Rocks neer the City of Bristoll. As also An accurate Treatise concerning TOBACCO. All which are likewise amplified since the former Impressions. LONDON. Printed by James Flesher, for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet Street. 1650. With a second part -- THE BATHS OF BATHE OR A necessary compendious Treatise concerning the Nature, Use, and Efficacy of those famous Hot-Waters. Published for the benefit of all such as yearely, for their health, resort to those Baths. With an Advertisement of the great utility that cometh to mans body, by the taking of Physick in the Spring, inferred upon a Question moved, concerning the frequency of sickness, and death of people more in that season, than in any other. Whereunto is also annexed a Censure concerning the Water of Saint Vincents rocks near Bristoll, which is in great request and use against the Stone. By To. Venner Doctor of Physick in Bathe. LONDON. Printed by James Flesher for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his shop in Saint Dunstans Churchyard in Fleetstreet, 1650. With a third part -- A Briefe and Accurate TREATISE CONCERNING The taking of the Fume of TOBACCO, Which very many, in these dayes, doe too too licencously use. In which the immoderate, irregular, and unreasonable use therof is reprehended, and the true nature and best manner of using it, perspicuously demonstrated. By TO. VENNER Doctor of Physick in Bathe. LONDON, Printed by James Flesher for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet Street, 1650
4to. Pp. Title Page. 2pp Preface. 6pp 'The Table' (1-342) There is a mis-pagination of 10 pages. It jumps from page 331 to 342 without loss of text. - THE 2nd PART; Pp. Title page. (345-393) There is a mis-pagination of 9 pages. It jumps from page 382 to 391 without loss of text - THE 3rd PART; Pp. Title Page. (397-417). Fully bound in contemporary brown calf with original boards and blind tooled borders. Original spine with blind tooling, a red label with gilt lettering and lines. The board on one side has split by the spine but still holding strongly due to re-inforced guttering on inside cover. A clean copy with minimal staining. Overall paper quality browned with age, particularly the title page. A scarce item.
- One of the most popular books on regimen of the period, with much information on diet and nutrition. Venner (1577-1660) Physician and writer. Graduated from Oxford in 1599 with a BA, and started as a medical practitioner and later was made a proper MD. He had a practice in Peterton, Bridgewater and Bath. He advocated moderation in smoking, but tears down some of the contemporary superstitions on the evil of the habit. Also, his writings did much to popularize the therapeutic waters of Bath. He was the first to use the word 'obesity' to describe people who are very overweight. In the bibliography ‘Old Cookery Books and Ancient Cuisine’ by William Carew Hazlitt, he brings our attention to Venner’s wide-ranging advice on various meats. “ He was evidently a very intelligent person, and affords us the result of his professional experience and personal observation. He considered two meals a day sufficient for all ordinary people; breakfast at eleven and supper at six (as at the universities); but he thought that children and the aged or infirm could not be tied by any rule. He condemns "bull's beef" as rank, unpleasant, and indigestible, and holds it best for the labourer; which seems to indicate more than anything else the low state of knowledge in the grazier, when Venner wrote: but there is something beyond friendly counsel where our author dissuades the poor from eating partridges, because they are calculated to promote asthma. "Wherefore," he ingenuously says, "when they shall chance to meet with a covey of young partridges, they were much better to bestow them upon such, for whom they are convenient!" Salmon, turbot, and sturgeon he also advises, is hard of digestion, and injurious, if taken to excess; nor does he approve of herrings and sprats; and anchovies he characterises as the meat of drunkards. It is the first that we have heard of them. He was not a bad judge of what was palatable, and prescribes as an agreeable and wholesome meal a couple of poached eggs with a little salt and vinegar, and a few corns of pepper, some bread and butter, and a draught of pure claret. He gives a receipt, possibly the earliest seen in print, for making metheglin or hydromel. He does not object to furmety or junket, or to custards, if they are eaten in the proper seasons, and in the middle or at the end of meals. But he dislikes mushrooms, and advises you to wash out your mouth, and rub your teeth and gums with a dry cloth, after drinking milk. The potato, however, he praises as nutritious and pleasant to the taste, yet, as Gerarde the herbalist also says, flatulent. Venner refers to a mode of sopping them in wine as existing in his time. They were sometimes roasted in the embers, and there were other ways of dressing them. John Forster, of Hanlop, in Bucks, wrote a pamphlet in 1664 to show that the more extended cultivation of this root would be a great national benefit.” - How true! But one wonders just how vocal he would be today when he sees obese children eating daily, large quantities of fried potato chips, loaded with over-used toxic oil.)

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10922

Verral.   William     - With the bookplate of Andre Simon and Eleanor Lowenstein
A Complete System of Cookery
In which is set forth, A variety of genuine RECEIPTS, collected from several Years Experience under the celebrated Mr. de ST. CLOUET, sometime since COOK to his grace the Duke of Newcastle. BY WILLIAM VERRAL, Master of the White-Hart Inn in Lewes, Sussex. Together with an INTRODUCTORY PREFACE, Shewing how every Dish is brought to the Table, and in what Manner the meanest Capacity shall never err in doing what his Bill of Fare contains. To which is added, A true Character of Monf. de ST. CLOUET. LONDON, Printed for the AUTHOR, and fold by him; As also by EDWARD VERRAL Bookseller, in LEWES: And by JOHN RIVINGTON in St. Paul's Church-yard, London. M DCC LIX
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION: 8vo. Pp. Title Page. 12pp 'Contents' (i-xxxiv) (1-240) Fully Bound in contemporary mid brown calf with gilt tooled borders. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines, gilt lettering and brown labels with slight damage. Internally clean with minimal aging and slight browning to pages 72 - 92. A very scarce item.
- Little is known about Verral, except he was the fifth son of Richard Verral who first opened the White-Hart Inn, Lewes Sussex as an hotel in 1713. In the book we learn that the well known Cook, Mons. de St. Clouet was a huge influence on him. Verral worked under his guidance in the Kitchens of the Duke of Newcastle. Gilly Lehman informs us that after being dismissed by Newcastle, Mons. Clouet took the post of Abermarle's Maitre d'hotel at the embassy in Paris. Verral also informs, that at some time, Clouet had also become steward to 'Marshal Richelieu' Verral unusually for an English cook gives each recipe with French and English titles, and praises the French style of cookery and service. The White Hart at Lewes has a very interesting history. The fourteenth-century house was at one time the residence of the Pelham-Clintons, and there was a secret staircase to be used in cases of urgency during the period from 1485-1603. When the Commonwealth was declared, in 1649, the wine cellar was used as a dungeon for captives. Following Wm. Verrall in ownership of the White Hart was a noted caterer, William Thomas Scrase, who knew the value of keeping his larder well stocked, a cellar of the choicest wines, and neat post-chaises and saddle horses of merit for journeying to any part of England. In the eighteenth century the Hotel was a favourite resort of Thomas Paine, then regarded as a notorious revolutionary, who wrote 'The Age of Reason' whilst in prison in Paris. About 1768 he formed 'The Headstrong Club" at a meeting held in the panelled room, but seven years later he had removed to Philadelphia where he advocated the abolition of negro slavery. In 1816, Bonaparte's military carriage and personal contents taken at Waterloo by Marshal Blucher were exhibited in the yard of the White Hart for two days. Today, on the internet, we are informed the Hotel is; "Rich with history, the hotel is known as the cradle of American Independence, where Thomas Paine forged his radical policies in the debating club of the old inn. His pamphlet "Common Sense" sold half a million copies in 1776 and inspired the Declaration of Independence, signed later that year. Nowadays, wood panelling, oak beams and open fireplaces all create a welcoming atmosphere. The White Hart Hotel has been substantially developed to offer a leisure club, restaurant and lounges for guests and locals alike. (See image #5 below)" To look at Wm. Verrall's book of 1759, and then view the White Hart web pages on the internet, gives a unique sense of the historical passage over time of this very old establishment.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10935

W.   S.    
THE NEW LONDON COOKERY.
ADAPTED TO THE USE OF PRIVATE FAMILIES. NINTH EDITION, GREATLY AUGMENTED AND IMPROVED. BY S.W. LONDON; JOSEPH SMITH, 193, HIGH HOLBORN. 1837.
Small 12vo. Frontispiece of one folding plate. Title page with double ruled border. 5pp engraved plates. 5pp blanks. i-iv Prefatory remarks. 1-548. 3pp Contents. 1p Catalogue of books. Very nicely bound in modern dark brown calf with blind tooled fillets and lines to the boards. Spine with raised bands and blind tooling in the compartments. Brown label with gilt lettering and date at the base. Text block nice and tight. Pages clean except for a continuous small stain on the upper corner of pages 217-489 without affecting the text. A nice copy of a very scarce book.
- Not in Oxford, Bitting nor Cagle. On page 141, a quaint recipe for 'Love in Disguise'-- After well cleaning, stuff a calf's heart, cover it an inch thick with forcemeat, then roll it in vermicelli, put it in a dish with a little water, and send it to the oven. When done, serve it in its own gravy in the dish. This forms a pretty side dish. An unusual but pleasing and quite comprehensive cookery book. Hard to fully categorise as there are no copies in any of the major cookery book collections and very little information available.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10964

W. M.       - The great 17th century classic.
The Queens Closet OPENED.
BEING Incomparable Secrets in Physick, Chyrurgery, Preserving, and Candying, &c. Which were presented to the QUEEN By the most experienc'd Persons of the times, many whereof were had in Esteem when she pleased to descend to private Recreations. The Tenth Edition, Corrected, with many new and large additions; together with Three exact Tables. Vivit post Funera Virtus. LONDON, Printed for E.Blagrave, and are to be sold by the Booksellers of London and Westminster, 1696. Bound with -- A QUEENS Delight:-- OR, The Art of Preserving, Conserving, and Candying. As also, A right Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most excellent Waters. LONDON Printed in the Year 1696. Bound with -- The Compleat COOK:-- Expertly Prescribing The most ready Ways, whether Italian, Spanish or French, FOR Dressing of Flesh and Fish, Ordering of Sauces, Or making of PASTRY. LONDON. Printed in the Year 1695.
12mo. 2feps.[1] Frontispiece of Henrietta Maria. Title Page.[1] 2p Preface. 4p Approvers Names. 1-163. 5p 'The Table' - THE 2ND PART; Title Page 'A Queens Delight'.[1] 171-264. 4p The Table. - THE 3RD PART; Title Page 'The Complete Cook'.[1] 271-401. 8p The Table.[1] 2feps. Fully Bound in contemporary dark brown calf with original boards and gilt tooled borders. Re-backed spine with gilt tooling, raised bands, and a red label with gilt lettering. Very clean internally, with minimal ageing to pages. Considering it is over 300 years old, a very scarce item in this fine condition.
- Henrietta Maria, Born 25 November 1609, was Princess of France and Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (13 June 1625 – 30 January 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. She was the mother of two kings, Charles II and James II, and was grandmother to Mary II, William III, and Queen Anne. The often hated catholic wife of King Charles 1 was well acquainted with a number of natural philosophers/scientists, including John Evelyn, Kenelm Digby, the physician Theodore Turquet de Mayerne, the mathematician John Pell and the apothecary John Parkinson. Drawing together the work of these men and other members of the queen’s household, Henrietta Maria’s name is associated with one of the most successful publications of the seventeenth century: ‘The Queens Closet Opened,’ first published in 1655. With various corrections and additions, it went into at least eighteen editions in the seventeenth century alone, and was further reprinted in the 18th century. It was in three parts, ‘The Pearl of Practise’ (remedies), ‘A Queens Delight’ (confectionery), and ‘The Compleat Cook’ (cookery). In the Preface, the presenter, W. M., informed the public that these were Henrietta Maria’s own receipts: Who is W.M.? In her fascinating article online, Jane Archer, of the University of Warwick, puts forward some compelling facts to support the theory that,----- ‘W. M.’ would have been instantly identifiable as Walter Montagu[e] (c.1603-1677), perhaps the closest and most loyal of Henrietta Maria’s ‘late servants’. A Catholic, an exile, a published author, a loyal servant who ‘fell with the Court’, and a secretary ---‘ Jane archer elaborates ‘---The precise facts of Montagu’s life are sketchy, but it is clear that he served Henrietta Maria as secretary and spy, a keeper and discoverer of secrets. The second son of the Earl of Manchester and a protégé of the Duke of Buckingham, Montagu first met Henrietta Maria in 1624, when he was sent on a secret mission to France to prepare the way for marriage negotiations. Following Buckingham’s assassination in 1628, Montagu established himself as a leading member of the Queen’s court at Denmark House. During the 1630s, he influenced the religious, political, cultural and philosophical life of Henrietta Maria’s household. Following his conversion to Catholicism in 1635, Montagu encouraged the Queen to take a more active role in propagating the Catholic faith in England ----‘ (because of this pushing of the Catholic faith, she become a hated figure, and her portrait as frontispiece to the ‘Closet Opened’ was often torn out. This is why many copies now lack the unique engraving) -----‘Montagu spent these years supervising the publication of his writings (some of which had previously circulated in manuscripts) in England. A brief scan of the dates of Montagu’s publications (1648, 1649, 1656 and 1660) reveals that he was in close and frequent contact with London publishers during the period when The Queens Closet Opened was first published.’ Archer further states ---‘ Indeed, if Montagu can be identified with ‘W. M.’, then it is tempting to interpret the publication of The Queens Closet Opened as a continuation of his work as loyal secretary to Henrietta Maria. An important aspect of the work of a secretary. ----‘ Due to failing health Henrietta Maria returned to her native France on the 24th June 1665, and lived the remainder of her life there. She died on 9th September 1669 at Colombes, near Paris. She was buried in St. Denis with the exception of her heart which was separately interred at Chaillot in a silver casket bearing the inscription; “Henrietta Maria, Queen of England, France, Scotland and Ireland, daughter of the King of France Henry IV the Victorious, wife of Charles I the Martyr and mother of the restored Charles II”. By any standards; a unique life and a unique book.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10920

Walsh.   J.H.    
THE BRITISH COOKERY BOOK
UNITING A GOOD STYLE WITH ECONOMY, AND ADAPTED TO ALL PERSONS IN EVERY CLIME: CONTAINING MANY UNPUBLISHED RECEIPTS IN DAILY USE BY PRIVATE FAMILIES. COLLECTED BY A COMMITTEE OF LADIES, AND EDITED BY J.H. WALSH F.R.C.S., AUTHOR OF "A MANUAL OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY". New Edition with Engravings. LONDON: ROUTLEDGE, WARNE, AND ROUTLEDGE, FARRINGDON STREET; AND 56, WALKER STREET, NEW YORK. 1863.
8vo. 3feps. Frontispiece of kitchen ranges with a tissue guard. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)vi-viii Contents. (1)2-350. 351-360 Bills of Fare. (1)362-375 Index. [1] 4feps. With eight wood engraved plates (including the Frontis) Original green cloth boards with fresh gilt stamped device on the front cover. The spine is relaid modern burgundy morocco with raised bands, gilt lines, two black labels with gilt lettering. Internally, very clean and tight except for the frontis which had overall small foxing.. A very nice copy.
- This is an exact copy of the first edition of 1859. The only difference is the change of title; from The English Cookery Book - 1859, to The British Cookery Book - 1863. Quite why it was changed from English to British, one can only guess. John Henry Walsh FRCS was born on 21st October, 1810, at Hackney, London. He was educated at private schools, and became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1844. For several years he followed his profession of surgeon, but gradually abandoned it on account of the success of his works on the subject of sport. He wrote on sport under the pseudonym of "Stonehenge". He moved from the country to London in 1852, and the following year brought out his first important book, The Greyhound (3rd ed. 1875), In 1856 his Manual of British Rural Sports appeared, which ran to many editions. During the same year he joined the staff of 'The Field', and became its editor at the close of 1857. Among his numerous books published under the name of "Stonehenge" are: • The Shot-Gun and Sporting Rifle (1859) • The Dog in Health and Disease (1859; 4th ed. 1887) • The Horse in the Stable and in the Field (1861; 13th ed. 1890) • Dogs of the British Isles (1867; 3rd ed. 1885) • The Modern Sportsman's Gun and Rifle (1882-1884) While editor of The Field, Walsh instituted a series of trials of guns, rifles and sporting powders extending over a period of many years, which greatly tended to the development of sporting firearms; and his influence upon all branches of sport was stimulating and beneficial. Besides this volume of cookery he also published 'A Manual of Domestic Economy'. He died at Putney on 12 February 1888, aged 77.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11148

Walsh.   John Henry     - In fine original condition.
The English Cookery Book
uniting A GOOD STYLE WITH ECONOMY, and ADAPTED TO ALL PERSONS IN ANY CLIME; containing MANY UNPUBLISHED RECEIPTS IN USE BY PRIVATE FAMILIES. COLLECTED BY A COMMITTEE OF LADIES. and edited by J.H. WALSH F.R.C.S., author of 'A Manual of Domestic Economy' With Engravings. LONDON; G. ROTALEDGE AND CO. FARRINGDON STREE; AND 18 BEEKMAN STREET, NEW YORK. 1859.
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. 1fep. Frontispiece of kitchen ranges. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)vi-viii Contents. (1)2-350. 351-360 Bills of Fare. (1)362-375 Index. [1] 1fep. With eight wood engraved plates (including the Frontis) Publisher's quarter red morocco and green cloth, gilt stamped on the spine and front cover. Housed in modern quarter dark tan and marbled boards slip-case, with gilt lines and tooling and gilt lettering. Internally very clean and tight with sometime past strengthening of the inside guttering. An extremely nice copy in this condition.
- Cagle, on pp 752, records an edition of 1858, unrecorded in other bibliographies. This edition of 1859 is a first also. Whether it is a 1st or 2nd issue is difficult to ascertain. The Preface is dated September 1858. Lacking any further information in the book or in Bitting or Axford, this compiler assumes this is a first edition - 2nd issue. The spine and boards are in exceptional condition. The spine is filled with the original beautiful bright gilt figures and lettering. A large bright gilt ornament of the quality is on the front cover. They are as good as new, thus the reason for the slip case.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10942

Walton.   Izaak     - A miniature with original binding.
The Compleat Angler
OR THE Contemplative Man's Recreation BEING A DISCOURSE OF RIVERS, FISH-PONDS, FISH AND FISHING WRITTEN BY IZAAK WALTON LONDON: HENRY FROWDE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS WAREHOUSE AMEN CORNER, E.C.
64mo. 2,1/16" x 1,3/4".(48 x 55mm) 1fep. Half title. Frontispiece of Walton. Decorative Title Page with the words "The Complete Angler or the Contemplative Men's Recreation" Title Page. [1] vii-xii Epistle Dedicatory. xiii-xix+(1)1-588. (Strangely the pagination has the page numbering starting in the middle of the dedication to the Reader). Has little engravings of fish in the text. Bound in the publishers original clean full limp dark fawn crushed morocco with gilt lettering on spine and front cover. All housed in a full brown calf clam-shell box with gilt lines on the boards. Spine has raised bands with gilt lines and green and red labels with gilt lettering. Inside the clam-shell box is lined with red felt. Internally the book is very clean. A handsome little item. Extremely scarce.
- An Oxford University Press, Miniature Edition. There is no date, but on the verso of the decorative title, it states: from "the fifth edition, much corrected and enlarged". The fifth edition, published in 1676, was the last which Walton himself corrected. This little volume was probably published - circa 1900. Walton’s famous treatise on fishing was printed five times in the seventeenth century. It was first published in May of 1653 with an engraved title-page and engravings of six fishes in the text. The second edition of 1655 contains many alterations and additions to the text, the number of pages being increased from 246 to 355, and the number of chapters from 13 to 21. Seven commendatory poems were prefixed. Four engravings of fishes were added. The third edition was printed in 1661 and re-issued in 1664, with a new title-page. A commendatory poem by Brome previously printed is omitted, and there are a few alterations in the text. The most significant additions are the "Postscript touching the Lawes of Angling" and the Index. The fourth edition was printed in 1668 and closely followed the third in content. The fifth edition, printed in 1676, introduced further changes. The text was revised and considerable additions were made, the length of the text being increased by 20 pages. The copper-plates were re-engraved. Altogether, 'The Compleat Angler' was reprinted 10 times in the eighteenth century, about 117 times in the nineteenth century, and between 30 and 40 times in the twentieth century. Of a single edition published by Cassell & Co. in 1886, 80,000 copies had been sold by 1914. The text of the fifth edition, 1676, has usually been followed in the subsequent printings. A hugely successful book over the centuries that has few rivals.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10953

Warner.   Richard     - With a signed hand written letter from Warner.
Antiquitates Culinariae;
or Curious Tracts relating to the Culinary affairs of the Old English, With a preliminary discourse, Notes, and Illustrations, By The Reverend Richard Warner, of Sway, near Lymington, Hants. Printed for R. Blamire Strand, London, 1791.
FIRST & SOLE EDITION. Large 4to. 1feps with a tipped in hand written letter from Richard Warner. [1] Frontispiece - an aquatint plate of 'A Saxon Entertainment' Engraved title-page. [2] 1 double-paged aquatint plate of the famous 'Peacock Feast'. (1)ii-lvii Preliminary Discourse. [1] (1)-l The Contents. [1]2-137. [1]1fep. Occasional very minor spotting, else a very well-preserved wide-margined large paper copy. Rare original cloth boards and leather spine with gilt lettering. Both ends of the spine slightly rubbed and a crack on one side but still solid. The tipped in 1p hand written letter from the Rev.Richard Warner to 'Mr Dear Sir' asking for a facsimile "of the words per me Ric. Abbem at the foot of the acknowledgement of supremecy of Hen: VIII." 110x160mm with very minor blemishes just above the signature. Dated 14th August 1825 - Weston super Mare, Somerset.
- Richard Warner (1763–1857), divine and antiquary, born in Marylebone, London, on 18 Oct. 1763, was the son of Richard Warner, ‘a respectable London tradesman.’ Early in his sixth year he was sent to a boarding-school near London, and remained there until his father removed, with his family, to Lymington in Hampshire, described by him in his ‘Literary Recollections’. On 19 Oct. 1787 he matriculated from St. Mary Hall, Oxford, and kept eight terms at the university, but left without taking a degree. About 1790 Warner was ordained by William Markham, archbishop of York, his title being the curacy of Wales, near Rotherham, where he stayed for three months, the curacy of his vicarage of Boldre, near Lymington for nearly four years. The influence of Gilpin's tastes was afterwards perceptible in the topographical writings of Warner. Then the more lucrative curacy of Fawle for over two years; but the situation did not agree with his family. The chapel of All Saints, Bath, in the parish of Walcot, was opened for divine service on 26 Oct. 1794, and Warner was placed in charge of it as curate to John Sibley, rector of the mother parish. In April 1795 he accepted the curacy of the populous parish of St. James's, Bath, and he continued in that position for about twenty-two years, preaching his farewell sermon on 23 March 1817. For many years after his settlement at Bath, Warner was the best-known man of letters in that city, and he knew all the literary men who frequented it. Warner was appointed on 13 May 1809 to the rectory of Great Chalfield in Wiltshire, which he enjoyed until his death. In the 1826 list of fellows of the Society of Antiquaries his name appears as elected, but he was never admitted. He died on 27 July 1857, when nearly ninety-four years of age, and was buried on 11 Aug. 1857 in the chancel of Chelwood church, a monument being erected to his memory. The widow, Anne [‘Pearson’], died at Widcombe Cottage, Bath, on 23 March 1865, aged 85, and was buried at Chelwood. One daughter, Ellen Rebecca Warner, was also buried there on 18 Sept. 1833. Warner's voluminous writings comprised over 44 various volumes. Given this huge output, one wonders if the people of his many parishes knew what he looked like. This, his infamous book, ‘Antiquitates Culinariæ: Tracts on Culinary Affairs of the Old English,’ 1791 attracted the attention and ire of John Carter (1748–1817) who prosecuted him for pirating in this work his print of the ‘Peacock Feast,’ and got a verdict for 20l guineas. The print was therefore torn from all the copies then unsold. This action cost Warner 70l guineas in all. Interestingly, Warner had been told that Carter had given permission for the reproduction. This fine original copy has survived with the ‘Peacock Feast’ plate intact.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11056