Copley.   Esther     - A very rare book.
Cottage Cookery
THE COMPLETE COTTAGE COOKERY, BY ESTHER COPLEY, AUTHOR OF "COTTAGE COMFORTS," "CATECHISM OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY," ETC, ETC. WITH PREFATORY CHAPTER BY HER DAUGHTER, AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE AUTHOR, Eleventh Edition. LONDON: GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCLIX.
1859. 12mo. Marbled paste-downs and end-papers, both ends. 1fep. [1] Frontis piece, engraved portrait of Esther Copley. Title page. [1] v-x Biographical Sketch. xi-xx Prefatory Chapter. 2p Contents. 3-127. [1] 4pp Advertisements. 1fep. Modern quarter black calf with black cloth boards and black calf corners. Lightly age browned throughout. A small water stain to the top corner of the last 8 pages. Overall a very nice copy.
- Although the first edition was printed in 1849 in book form (it originally appeared in the Family Economist) an advertisement for a tenth edition (cost 1 penny) appeared in the first of Beeton's 'Household Management' 24 monthly booklets on November 1st, 1859 (Mrs Beeton's famous book was printed in 24 monthly parts before being published in total as the first edition of 1861). A seventh edition also was advertised in an 1854 book; then this, the eleventh edition of 1859 would make one think there must be many copies, but the opposite is true; 'Cottage Cookery' is unmentioned in Bitting, Oxford, Axford, Driver, Attar, Cagle and the STC of Pollard & Redgrave. COPAC lists five copies: The BL, one copy - circa 1855. London University, one copy undated. Leeds University, three copies - 1858, 1859 & 1862. Only five recorded copies; one must attribute rarity. This can be accounted for when we see that Beeton's monthly booklets with their thin and delicate paper covers, easily damaged, lost or torn was sold for only three pence, then Copley's small booklet, sold for one pence must have been even less protected. Luckily this copy has lasted well.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11016

Copley.   Esther    
THE HOUSEKEEPER'S GUIDE
OR A PLAIN & PRACTICAL SYSTEM OF Domestic Cookery, BY ESTHER COPLEY. Author of Cottage Comforts &c. (A small illustration of kitchen equipment) London. PRINTED FOR JACKSON & WALFORD 18 St PAULS CHURCH YARD 1834.
FIRST EDITION. 180 x 113 mm. 1fep with ownership inscriptions. Frontispiece of a fine illustration of a kitchen scene. 1st ornate Title page. 2nd Title Page. (1)iv - xi Introduction. 5 plates of Carving and Butchery Illustrations, 1loose. (1)2 - 391. [1] (1)394 - 407 Index. [1] 1fep. 1/4 green publisher's original cloth with original grey paper hardboard covers. Text block slightly dusty but fine. Overall in good original condition. This is possibly Copley's scarcest title.
- Esther Copley (born Esther Beuzeville on 10 May 1786 in London, died on 17 July 1851 in Eythorne, Kent) was a prolific author of children's books, tracts, and books on domestic economy. Cottage Comforts (1825), addressed to the working people, went into scores of editions, for example. Among several other works on domestic matters was the pamphlet Hints on the Cholera morbus (1832), on how to prevent and treat the disease. Her stories for children were mainly didactic, designed to make them thrifty and good by providing examples of moral behaviour. She also wrote longer, non-fiction works for children, including Scripture Natural History for Youth (1828) and a 500-page History of Slavery and its Abolition (1836). [Ref: Rooke Books - Home of the mad librarian]

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11269

Copley.   Esther    
THE COOK'S COMPLETE GUIDE,
ON THE PRINCIPLES OF Frugality, Comfort, and Elegance INCLUDING THE ART OF CARVING, AND THE MOST APPROVED METHOD OF SETTING OUT A TABLE EXPLAINED BY NUMEROUS COPPER-PLATE ENGRAVINGS, INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRESERVING HEALTH, AND ATTAINING OLD AGE; WITH DIRECTIONS FOR BREEDING AND FATTENING ALL SORTS OF POULTRY, AND FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF BEES, RABBITS, PIGS &c. &c. RULES FOR CULTIVATING A GARDEN, AND NUMEROUS USEFUL MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. a line. BY A LADY, AUTHORESS OF "COTTAGE COMFORTS" a line. London: GEORGE VIRTUE, 26, IVY LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW.
FIRST EDITION. n/d Circa 1827. Thick 8vo. 222 x 148 x 50mm. 2 feps. 1p with ink Inscription from an aunt dated 1843. Frontispiece of a lady displaying meat, fish and vegetables. An first elaborate Title Page (The New London Cookery by a Lady). [1] Title Page. [1] 2p Contents. (1)-iv Preface. (3)4 - 812. 813 Addenda. (1)815 - 838 Index. 1fep. 5 Engraved plates in Text. Title page slightly age browned. Both title pages with small smudge not affecting text. Text Block very clean. Nicely bound with 1/4 light tan calf. Spine with raised bands and gilt lines. Dark brown label with gilt lettering. Boards with marbled paper and tan calf corners. Overall well preserved.
- This is a very comprehensive thick book with a huge 38 page Index. It is one of the many thick books of the time, all produced with similar layouts and abundant details. When they are all seen together, one is struck by how Beeton's Household Management of 1861, although some-what similar to the others, broke the mould with colour plates and better designed formatting. Hence its huge popularity. This book's title page proclaims the un-named Authoress (Esther Copley) to be the same as for the relatively small 'Cottage Comforts' (see item 10930 above). She also wrote one other small book titled 'Cottage Cookery' (see item 11016 below). Published and printed by Gorge Virtue this was a contracted work "by a Lady" that was subtly attributed to Copley to increase sales. We can be sure of this because the two "Cottage" books previously mentioned are clearly declared on the title pages as written by her. I'm sure she would wish the attribution of this book to her was also stated just as clearly.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11258

Copley.   Esther    
Cottage Comforts
WITH HINTS FOR PROMOTING THEM, GLEANED FROM EXPERIENCE: ENLIVENED WITH AUTHENTIC ANECDOTES. BY ESTHER COPLEY. NINTH EDITION. DEDICATED (BY PERMISSION) TO Her Most Gracious Majesty QUEEN ADELAIDE. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, STATIONER'S COURT. 1832.
12mo. 2feps. Title Page. [1] 2pp Dedication. 2pp Advertisement. 2pp Contents. 1-224. 8pp Index. [1] 2feps. Bound in half black calf with black cloth boards and calf corners. Spine with gilt lines, raised bands and gilt lettering. Good copy with very slight foxing to title page, first nine pages and the pages of the index.
- Esther Hewlitt Copley (nee Buizeville) was born in London on May 10th, 1786. Her father was a silk manufacturer at Spitalfields and the family lived in Hackney. Nothing is known of Esther's early life experiences until her marriage to James Philip Hewlett in 1809. The couple had five children, three sons and two daughters. They set up house in Oxford in St. Aldate's Street. James Philip Hewlett died prematurely of a lingering illness. On August 16, 1827 Esther married Rev. William Copley who was the minister of the Oxford Baptist Church. Esther was a prolific writer publishing more than forty books in her lifetime. These include tracts, works of domestic economy, stories for children, text books, sacred history and biography. It is of interest to note that Cottage Comforts, first published in 1825, reached its twenty-fourth edition in 1864. It is a household management manual addressed to the labouring classes embracing the spirit of both Mrs. Beeton and Dr. Spock. It includes chapters on childbirth, treatment of illnesses, hygiene, animal husbandry, the care and education of children, renting and furnishing a cottage, brewing and cookery. She is forthright with her opinions and practical advice. In her latter days Esther lived in Eythorne with her daughter Emma and Emma's husband, George Sargent. Her death on July 17th, 1851, was caused by tuberculosis, and it seems that her illness was exacerbated by a chill contracted when she was providing help for a needy family. Esther is buried in the Eythorne Baptist churchyard in Kent.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10930

COPLEY.   ESTHER     This title printed anonymously.
The Female Instructor
OR, Young Woman's Companion: BEING A GUIDE TO ALL THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS WHICH ADORN THE FEMALE CHARACTER, EITHER AS A USEFUL MEMBER OF SOCIETY-A PLEASING AND INSTRUCTIVE COMPANION, OR, A RESPECTABLE MOTHER OF A FAMILY. WITH MANY Pleasing Examples of Illustrious Females. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, USEFUL MEDICINAL RECEIPTS, AND A CONCISE SYSTEM OF COOKERY, WITH OTHER VALUABLE INFORMATION IN THE DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. " Favour is deceitful, and Beauty is vain; but a Woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised." SOLOMON. LIVERPOOL: PRINTED BY HENRY FISHER, CAXTON, (Printer in ordinary to his Majesty) And published there, and at his Warehouse, 87, Bartholomew Close, London.
Large octavo. Frontispiece of 'Female Accomplishments' Extra Title page with engraved picture. Title Page. pp.i-iv 4pp 'Index' (10-560) Bound in modern brown quarter calf with marble boards and calf corners. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and a red morocco label with gilt lettering. All six plates present. The Frontis and extra Title page are slightly browned and stained. The rest very slightly age browned.
- This copy is a reprint of the 1815 edition. The frontispiece, representing two young women sewing and reading is dated 1816.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10950

Cox.   James     - An unusually long 19" plate.
The Practical Confectioner,
EMBRACING THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF Pastry, and Confectionery, IN ALL THEIR VARIOUS BRANCHES; Containing upwards of 200 Genuine and Valuable RECEIPTS; CONSISTING OF upwards of 60 Second-Course and Supper Dishes; INCLUDING Jellies, Creams, Soufflés Puddings, Chantillas, and Ornamental Pastry and Confectionary of every description: Preserving in all its Various branches; Cakes and Biscuits of various kinds; Ice Creams and Water Ices; Sugars, Candies, Syrups &cc.; Many of which have never appeared in Print: the whole written in the plainest manner, without the least ambiguity; WITH THE BILLS OF FARE FOR BALL SUPPERS, ON A LARGE AND SMALL SCALE. BY JAMES COX. London: Published by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Browne; and sold by all the booksellers in the United Kingdom. 1822. PRICE EIGHT SHILLINGS.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION: 12 mo. 2feps. Title page with printers - Newcombe of Broad-Street, Bristol on verso. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface. 4 Plates of Bills of Fare, 3 folding with the largest measuring an unusual 19 inches long. (1)8-220. (1)222-234 Index. 2feps. Full calf with slightly faded boards and relaid calf spine with blind tooling, gilt lines and lettering. Cookery books are famed for the attrition they suffer in the greasy hands of those that use them. Although this one lacks the aforementioned grease, internally it is slightly yellowed with age, but overall its a fine copy of an extremely scarce book.
- One of the landmark books in the field of confectionery, pastry and sweets. A sole edition, the date on the preface states Clifton (Bristol) August 1822, and also advertised for 8 shillings in The London Literary Gazette on Saturday, September 14th 1822. One sees the antiquated style of the title echoed in other books throughout the 19th century. Never the less, Cox’s well illustrated and informed work and although probably one of the the lesser known, is certainly on a par with the other great Confectioners; Nutt, Jarrin, Borella, Dubois et al. Copies in any condition are extremely scarce, even possibly rare. A key work in any collection of antiquarian cookery books. COPAC reveals five copies: St Andrews , Aberdeen, Cambridge, the Wellcome library and the BL also has one copy.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11153

Dalgairns   Mrs     - The 2nd Edition.
The Practice of Cookery.
ADAPTED BY THE BUSINESS OF EVERY DAY LIFE. BY MRS DALGAIRNS. SECOND EDITION. EDINBURGH: PRINTED FOR CADELL AND COMPANY EDINBURGH: SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, LONDON: AND ALL BOOKSELLERS. [A small single line] 1829. [an messy ink stain in the top right corner, not affecting text].
174 x 105 mm. fep. Title page. [1]. Preface (1)vi-viii. Preface to the second edition. [1]. Index (1)xii-xxix. [1] Half Title page. [1]. (1)2-524. Appendix (1)526-528. 1fep. 1455 recipes in total. Full dark tan contemporary binding. Original re-backed spine with black label and gilt lettering. Some ink writing on the title page and with a small hole not affecting the text. Overall a nice copy.
- Online there is a surprising amount of detailed information about Mrs Dalgairns and her book: "The Practice of Cookery Adapted to the Business of Every-day Life.". Most of the information can be found at three places: #1 - http://www.cooksinfo.com --- #2 - http://www.electricscotland.com -- #3 – The Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada, Vol 45, No 1 (2007) 'A Fortuitous Nineteenth-Century Success Story' by Mary F. Williamson of York University, Toronto, Canada. Most of the relevant information online is reproduced here. Mrs Dalgairns had the ‘The Practice of Cookery’ published in 1829, and republished up until 1860. This copy is a 2nd edition, published in Edinburgh in 1829, the same year as the 1st edition, also published there. Cagle has a 2nd, and proclaims it is not shown in any other bibliographies consulted. Interestingly Cagle's 2nd edition asks for 532 pages. This copy has 528 and appears to be complete. One can only assume the missing 4 pages are advertisements. Catherine Emily Callbeck Dalgairns was an upper-middle class amateur foodie. The goal of the book was to enable any cook or housekeeper of limited experience to know how to prepare well most dishes in fashion at the time. She hoped that, at the same time, it might "be no less useful to the mistress of a family, if required for occasional reference." She stated at the outset that she was not providing any new recipes, but trying to select the best amongst those "already established in public favour." She either tested them herself, or relied on the opinion of "persons whose accuracy in the various manipulations could be safely relied upon." She used an unusual and helpful method in her book. Instead of doing all her introductory remarks lumped together at the beginning of the book, she put relevant remarks at the start of each chapter. She provided both a chapter list at the front, and an index at the back. Catherine was born into a privileged family in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (PEI), approximately in the late 1780s. She had three sisters, and two brothers. She was very much a child of the British Empire. Though born on Prince Edward Island, she had relatives in Ireland, England and in the American colonies. Her parents were Phillips (sic) Callbeck (1743 to 28 February 1790) and Anne Coffin (1752 to 15 October 1826.) Her father was Attorney-General and Surrogate-General of Probate of the Island of St John (aka Prince Edward Island), then president of His Majesty's Council for the same colony. He owned 20,000 acres of land there. During the American Revolution, he was taken prisoner during a sally by two American privateers into Charlottetown Harbour, taken south to the American colonies, and handed over to Colonel George Washington. Washington set him free with a letter of apology. On 11 September 1808, Catherine married Peter Dalgairns (born in Scotland on 29 October 1793. The couple left PEI sometime shortly afterward, living first in London, then moving to Dundee, Scotland around 1822. In 1829, she published her cookbook. The couple never returned to Prince Edward Island. They both died in Dundee, Scotland: Catherine on 1 March 1844 and Peter in 1853. Occasionally, you may see her referred to as perhaps the first "Canadian" cookbook author. Her Canadian association is tenuous, though, and mostly an accident of birth. It may be more accurate to term her, as does Mary F. Williamson, a 'British North American'. As far as the cook book is concerned, being printed in Edinburgh by an author residing in Dundee, the recipes are not exclusively Scottish. The recipes are highly varied, with many French culinary terms. There are recipes for Currie, Indian Pancakes, Caveach of Fish, Meat Kebabs, a rather basic Sauce Robert, a Boudin a la’ Richlieu. An interesting and fairly original Cookery book. Oxford p163 for a 1st edition. Bitting a 6th of 1836.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11245

Dali.   Salvador     With a beautiful lithograph hand-signed by Dali in pencil.
DALI: THE WINES OF GALA.
Translated from the French by Olivier Bernier. Published by Harry N. Abrams Inc. 1978, New York.
FIRST EDITION. 4to. 216 x 305 mm. Inside cover with double page portrait of Dali. 1fep. Half Title. Double page Title. Verso with printer info. p 5-7. Contents. p 8-11 Intro; La Cave. (10-16). p 16-293. p 294-296 Guide to more than 140 illustrations, including 124 in full colour. Original white silk cloth hardcover. With titles in gilt and multi-colour. Dali design to front cover. A near fine copy in very good gold embossed jacket. ITEM 2. 493 x 276 mm. A lithograph of the 'King of Cup Hand' Tarot suite. [Ref: The official catalogue of the graphic works of Salvador Dali by Albert Field]. Hand signed in pencil by Dali. Also numbered 'EA' (Epreuve d' Artiste). Housed in a marbled paper folder. To accompany the 'Wines of Gala'.
- The 'Wines of Gala' is an extravagant production, eccentric and personal by the great Spanish surrealist, Salvador Domenech Felipe Jacinto Dali. As a follow-up to his phenomenal best-selling cookbook 'Les dîners de Gala', it's in this delightfully eccentric guide to wine, the surrealist master shares his passion for the gift of the gods. The book explores the many myths of the grape, in texts and sensuous, subversive works by the artist, always true to his maxim: “A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.” Dali's take on pleasures of the grape and the book sets out to organize wines "according to the sensations they create in our very depths." Through eclectic metrics like production method, weight, and colour, the book presents wines of the world in such innovative, Daliesque groupings such as "Wines of Frivolity," "Wines of the Impossible," and "Wines of Light". The significant wine regions are, 'Dix Vins du Divin' [ten Divine Wines] that Dali highlights including descriptions of the wines of Ay, Shiraz, King Minos, Lacrima Christi, the Great Red Bordeaux, Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Romanée Conti, Sherry, Châteaud’Yquem, and California wines. Bursting with the imagery of the 140 fantastic illustrations by Dali, many of which are appropriated artworks, including various classical nudes, all of them reconstructed with suitably Surrealist, provocative touches, like Jean-Francois Millet's 'The Angelus', one of Dali's favourite points of reference over the decades. Dali also included what is now considered one of the greatest works from his late "Nuclear Mystic" phase, 'The Sacrament of the Last Supper' (1955), which sets the iconic biblical scene in a translucent dodecahedron-shaped space before a Catalonian coastal landscape. Dali was by this stage a devout Catholic, simultaneously captivated by science, optical illusion, and the atomic age. Rather than any prescriptive classification, the book is a flamboyant, free-flowing manifesto in favour of taste and feeling, as much as a multisensory treat, also a full-bodied document of Dali's late-stage oeuvre, in which the artist both reflected on formative influences and refined his own cultural legacy. Wines of Gala was published in 1977, first in French, as 'Les Vins de Gala et du Divin' by Draeger, then in English by Abrams in New York a year later. Dedicated to Dalí’s long-time wife and muse, Gala, an imperious Russian woman 10 years his elder. The book covers Dalí’s famously intense obsession with sexuality and desire for food and wine, three sensual topics he’d rarely addressed in his work. But while the earlier cookbook has grown in notoriety and acclaim since it went out of print, reliably selling for hundreds of dollars whenever a used copy turns up, 'Wines of Gala' sank beneath the surface, an afterthought at the tail end of the 20th-century master’s career. How-ever a full reprint of the 1st edition published by Taschen in November 2017 changed all that. The book became the winner of the 2018 Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, causing this second book of Dali's to be as sought after as his first one. A fine addition to a gastronomic library, made all the more collectable with the accompanying large, expanded sized lithograph of the tarot card, hand-signed by Dali. (image #5 below). The cards were designed by Dali and first published in a 1984 limited edition box set of 78 cards, each dazzling in colour, that has since long been sold out.

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Modern category
ref number: 11300

Dali.   Salvador     With a fine surreal lithograph of a peach, signed by Dali in pencil.
les diners de Gala
translated by Captain J. Peter Moore FELICIE, INC.- PUBLISHERS - NEW YORK
1st EDITION. 1973. Thick 4to. 350 x 220 x 35 mm. Inside cover and first page with Illustration of bread and signed by an indistinctly named husband to his wife. [2] Frontis of Dali. Title Page. 8 - 316. 317 - 321 Table of Contents. [1] A dedication page for the origins of the book's recipes. 1 fep and inside end cover with a fantastic illustration of 4 nude women dining. Hardcover with bright gold, foil-like wildly illustrated dust jacket. Overall, exceptionally fine condition. Also inserted inside is a fine lithograph of an apple and leaves in colour. Being a Dali creation, it is not just an apple, but has a quickly done line drawing of a guitarist in a landscape. Numbered 181/250. With Dali's distinct signature in pencil.
- This production by the great Spanish Surrealist painter Salvador Dali, has to be defined as one of the most interesting and unusual cookery books ever published, with recipes by the Chefs of famous Paris restaurants, such as Lasserre, La Tour d’Argent, Maxim’s, and Le Train Bleu (Le Buffet de la Gare de Lyon). The chapters are as follows: 1 Les caprices pincés princiers exotic dishes: 2 Les cannibalismes de l'automne eggs - sea food: 3 Les suprêmes de malaises lilliputiens first course: 4 Les entre-plats sodomisés meals: 5 Les spoutniks astiqués d'asticots statistiques snails - frogs: 6 Les panaches panachés fish - shell fish: 7 Les chairs monarchiques game - poultry: 8 Les montres molles 1/2 sommeil pork: 9 L'atavisme désoxyribonucléique vegetables: 10 Les "je mange GALA" aphrodisiacs: 11 Les pios nonoches sweets - dessert: 12 Les délices petits matryrs hors-d'œuvre: It is also an outstanding art book that not only has very good recipes, but is a wonder to read. Dali also notes in the introduction that his book is not designed for anyone watching their waistline. Born on 11 May 1904, at 8:45 am GMT in Figueres, Catalonia, Salvador Dalí was a skilled artist and draftsman best known for the striking and bizarre images in his work. His painting skills are often attributed to the influence and fine finishing of Renaissance masters. His best-known work, The 'Persistence of Memory', was completed in August 1931, and is one of the most recognisable Surrealist paintings. Dalí's expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, at times in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media. This book of cookery is an unusual addition to his norm. Dalí was highly imaginative, and also enjoyed indulging in unusual and grandiose behaviour. To the dismay of those who held his work in high regard, and to the irritation of his critics, his eccentric manner and attention-grabbing public actions sometimes drew more attention than his artwork. Dalí attended drawing school. In 1916, he also discovered modern painting on a summer vacation trip to Cadaqués with the family of Ramon Pichot, a local artist who made regular trips to Paris. The next year, Dalí's father organized an exhibition of his son's charcoal drawings in their family home. He had his first public exhibition at the Municipal Theatre in Figueres in 1918. In early 1921 the Pichot family introduced Dalí to Futurism and Dalí's uncle Anselm Domenech, who owned a bookshop in Barcelona, supplied him with books and magazines on Cubism and contemporary art. On 6 February 1921, Dalí's mother died of uterine cancer. Dalí was 16 years old; he later said his mother's death "was the greatest blow I had experienced in my life. I worshipped her... I could not resign myself to the loss of a being on whom I counted to make invisible the unavoidable blemishes of my soul. After her death, Dalí's father married his deceased wife's sister. Dalí did not resent this marriage, because he had great love and respect for his aunt. In 1929, Dalí collaborated with the surrealist film director Luis Buñuel on the short film 'Un Chien Andalou' (An Andalusian Dog). His main contribution was to help Buñuel write the script for the film. Dalí later claimed to have also played a significant role in the filming of the project, but this is not substantiated by contemporary accounts. Also, in August 1929, Dalí met his lifelong and primary muse and future wife Gala, born Elena Ivanovna Diakonova. She was a Russian immigrant ten years his senior, who at that time was married to surrealist poet Paul Éluard. In the same year, Dalí officially joined the Surrealist group in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris. The Surrealists hailed what Dalí called his paranoiac-critical method of accessing the subconscious for greater artistic creativity. Gala first met Dalí that year during a trip to Cadaques with her family and the artist Magritte and his wife. Despite the ten-year age gap, the love affair between Dalí and Gala quickly developed. In 1948 Dalí and Gala moved back into their house in Port Lligat, on the coast near Cadaqués. For the next three decades, he would spend most of his time there painting, taking time off and spending winters with his wife in Paris and New York. Gala died on 10 June 1982, at the age of 87. After Gala's death, Dalí lost much of his will to live. He deliberately dehydrated himself. On the morning of 23 January 1989, while his favourite record of Tristan and Isolde played, Dalí died of heart failure at the age of 84. He is buried in the crypt below the stage of his Theatre and Museum in Figueres. The location is across the street from the church of Sant Pere, where he had his baptism, first communion, and funeral, and is only 450 metres from the house where he was born. An amazing unparalleled life. This book and lithograph, a fantastic insight and glimpse of the great artist. Only around 400 copies of Les Diners de Gala are known to survive. However, Taschen has finally published and made this rare book available for the first time in 43 years as a new reprinted 2nd edition.

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Modern category
ref number: 11252

Dallas   Enaeas Sweetlands     Once owned and signed by G.A. Sala. [image below]
KETTNER'S BOOK OF THE TABLE.
KETTNER'S BOOK OF THE TABLE. A MANUAL OF COOKERY. PRCTICAL - THEORETICAL - HISTORICAL. Written in George Augustus Sala's small neat hand - "The literary and critical portion of this book was written by my very dear friend Enaeas S. Dallas, sometime of the " Times" Newspaper and Editor of "Once a Week". A poem form Paradise Regained. Somewhat obscured by stencilled holes of the FORBES LIBRARY. NORTHAMPTON. MASS. LONDON. DULAU AND CO. SOHO SQUARE.1877. A poem form Paradise Regained. Somewhat obscured by stencilled holes of the FORBES LIBRARY. NORTHAMPTON. MASS. LONDON. DULAU AND CO. SOHO SQUARE.1877.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. Marbled end-papers with Forbes Library bookplate. On verso -1 fep. 1p Half-title - THE BOOK OF THE TABLE and an inscription in Sala's neat hand - George Augustus Sala, 46 Mecklenburg Sq. W.C. 1878. On verso a two-line poem from Paradise Regained. Title Page. [1]. 1p dedication to GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA. [1]. 1-16 Introduction. 1p Half-title - THE BOOK OF THE TABLE. [1]. 19-500. 4 blanks for Notes. 1fep. Marbled end papers, Old red marbled boards with red leather quarter binding and tips, all with gilt lines. Red leather spine compartmentalised with dull gilt tooling. Internally a little brown aged but overall very clean. Also enclosed: 1p. 7x4.5 inches with minor creases. From the Reform Club 24th January - no year given. An autograph letter signed: "G.A. Sala to G.Linnaeus Banks, sending 'a doz. stamps for Shakespeare heads" and mentioning the Shakespeare committee business" Internally a little brown aged but overall very clean. Also attached: 1p. 7x 4.5 inches with minor creases. From the Reform Club 24th January - no year given. An autograph letter signed: "G.A. Sala to G.Linnaeus Banks, sending 'a doz. stamps for Shakespeare heads" and mentioning the Shakespeare committee business"
- Kettner’s was one of the first and oldest French restaurants in London. Opened in Romilly Street in Soho 1867 by August Kettner, known as a very fastidious chef to Napoleon III. English aristocracy in waistcoats, and in love, would bring their wives and their mistresses to try Kettner's French cuisine for the first time – feasts of carp fillets à la Duxelle, fried Gudgeon with asparagus in cream, devilled Kidney and thick Eel stews, all followed by Apple and Almond tarts for dessert. Ever popular with historical figures throughout its gilded history. King Edward VII is said to have courted his mistress, actress Lillie Langtry, there. They say that the philandering King had a secret underground passageway built between the restaurant and the Palace Theatre next door, so that his mistress could slip away after performances for an intermission of supper downstairs and a final act in the private rooms upstairs. The lounge and Champagne Bar have welcomed visitors including Oscar Wilde wining and dining the rent boy Charles Parker, Agatha Christie tucking into a bouillabaisse, Sir Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and Bing Crosby among others. Kettner’s wasn’t just part of Soho, it was Soho. It was the sordidness and the sobriety. Rising up around the restaurant over generations, Soho was built and re-built to be London’s den of iniquity. Today, a more discreet and gentile Kettner’s comprises seven Georgian townhouses, including the Grade II-listed club space and two bars, all carefully restored with close attention to original features and details. On the three top floors are 33 bedrooms and the Grade II-listed Jacobean Suite, with its own private entrance. The Kettner’s well known art collection is inspired by the buildings’ former risqué reputation. Now, as is the way of the world, the restaurant is re-branded, re-born. The continuation of the Kettner name may serve only as a wink to the past and a nod to the future, in the sober but still vibrant district of Soho. E.S. Dallas [Enaeas Sweetland Dallas] was the author of Kettners 'Book of the Table' and was a very good friend of Sala's. G.A. Sala, born in London, tried his hand at writing, at a very early date and in 1851 attracted the attention of Charles Dickens, who published articles and stories by him in Household Words and subsequently in All the Year Round, and in 1856 sent him to Russia as a special correspondent. In 1860, over his own initials "G.A.S.", he began writing "Echoes of the Week" for the Illustrated London News, and continued to do so till 1886, when they were continued in a syndicate of weekly newspapers almost to his death. William Makepeace Thackeray, when editor of the Cornhill, published articles by him on Hogarth in 1860, which were issued in column form in 1866; and in the former year he was given the editorship of Temple Bar, which he held till 1863. Meanwhile, he had become in 1857 a contributor to The Daily Telegraph, and it was in this capacity that he did his most characteristic work, whether as a foreign correspondent in all parts of the world, or as a writer of "leaders" or special articles. His literary style, highly coloured, bombastic, egotistical and full of turgid periphrasis, gradually became associated by the public with their conception of the Daily Telegraph; and though the butt of the more scholarly literary world, his articles were invariably full of interesting matter and helped to make the reputation of the paper. Sala died at Brighton on 8th December, 1895. In an email I received from Linda Gifkins, she kindly informed me of a hitherto unknown edition of Sala's quite rare book 'The Thorough Good Cook', printed by Brentano's - New York, Chicago, Paris, & Washington in 1896. Sala was twice married. His first wife, Harriet, whom he married in September 1859, died at Melbourne in December 1885. In 1891 he married a second wife, Bessie, third daughter of Robert Stannard, C.E., who survived him.

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