Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - A beautiful copy bound by Sangorski and Sutcliffe
A Guide To Modern Cookery
BY A. ESCOFFIER OF THE CARLTON HOTEL LONDON WILLIAM HEINEMANN 1907. Inserted inside --- a 4 page promotional pamphlet for: ESCOFFIER LIMITED. Wholesale Department:- RIDGEMONT STREET. (Off Shore Street) TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD, LONDON, WC. Inside it tells us: ESCOFFIER PREPARATIONS. Manufactured under the Supervision of MONS. ESCOFFIER. of the Carlton Hotel. London. With lists of all Escoffier items and prices.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. Royal Octavo. Marbled paste-down back and front with marbled endpapers. 1fep. Half title. [1] Frontispiece of 'Escoffier'. Title Page. [1] 1+v-x Preface. 1+xii Contents. 1+xiv-xvi Glossary. 1+2-880. 1fep. Beautifully bound by Sangorski and Sutcliffe in full green morocco. Beautiful gilt tooling to edges and spine with gilt motif of crossed knifes and forks and sand timers on corners of the boards. A red goatskin label with gilt lettering. All page edges gilt. Housed for protection in a sympathetic green buckram and morocco covered slip case. Internally - as new.
- This is the second copy of 'A Guide to Modern Cookery' 1907, I have seen with the promotional pamphlet tucked inside. It is quite possible that Escoffier had this nicely designed, four page price list inserted in every copy of 'A Guide to Modern Cookery'. Escoffier (1846-1935) was a great innovator, as can be seen by the large range of sauces, soups, pickles, consomme's, vinegars etc (even the famous Sauce Melba) featured in the pamphlet. Probably the most lasting but least known food item that he developed and started producing on a large commercial scale, was tinned tomatoes. He is credited, in their excellent biography of Escoffier by Eugene Herbodeau and Paul Thalamas, of first producing 2000 x 2 kilo tins in Saxon-les-Bains for the Savoy Hotel, while he was Chef de Cuisine. The fame of the product grew so fast that the following year, the food manufacturer, La Maison Caressa of Nice produced 60.000 kilos under his direction. This book is in exceptional condition and with the enclosed Escoffier pamphlet which in itself is a rare piece of ephemera, makes this item very desirable.

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Modern category
ref number: 10928

Evelyn.   John     - The first book about Salads
Acetaria
A DISCOURSE OF SALLETS. By J.E. S.R.S. Author of the Kalendarium. [A quotation in Greek from the Greek dramatist, Cratinus] 'It is in every man's power to season well' LONDON, Printed for B. Tooke at the Middle-Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1699.
FIRST EDITION. 1fep. Title Page with double lined border. 20pp.Dedication. 10pp.Preface 6pp.The Plan of a Royal Garden. 1-192. 2pp.Folding Table between 108-109. 35pp.Appendix. 13pp.Table. 1pp.Errata. [1] 1fep. All pages uniformly browned. Title page and first page of the dedication backed with clear page tape without visual loss of text. Very nice early full mottled calf binding, raised bands with gilt lines, dark orange label with gilt lettering. With a nice aged patina. Very rare.
- John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a prolific writer and translator, touching on politics, manners, and religion as well as the more practical arts of architecture, painting and engraving, sculpture, numismatics, and perhaps what he is best known for (besides his diary) gardening and forestry. His most important original contributions are perhaps 'Sylva' which he composed at the behest of the Royal Society in 1664. Acetaria is but a chapter in 'Sylva' subtitled 'A Discourse of Sallets'. Part of Evelyn's literary knowledge of the garden were his translations of the French horticultural manual by Nicolas de Bonnefons and the garden poem (in Latin) by Renatus Rapinaus. Acetaria is certainly full of observations of how the English ways, either in the garden or at table, differed from French, Italian and Spanish - with occasional reference to India, Germany, Holland, Africa and America for good measure. The text also underscores the relative novelty of some aspects of the art of kitchen-gardening in England: we had much to learn by way of cultural techniques from the Dutch and the French, as well as plants that were of recent introduction, for example the Dutch cabbages brought over by Sir Anthony Ashley. His recipes for dressing salads is knowledgeable and interestingly not changed much in UK and Europe. Quite what Evelyn in his time, would have made of the myriad concoctions assembled to dress salads in America, and particularly in health obsessed California, one wonders. Due to the relative preparation of salads, where cooking is at a minimum, this book is quite ageless compared to other cookery books that mirror changing times.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10946

Fagan.   Louis    
1836 - 1886. The Reform Club:
ITS FOUNDERS AND ARCHITECT. BY LOUIS FAGAN, Of the Department of Prints and Drawings, the British Museum. Honorary Member of the Society of Engravers of France; Author of "The Life of Sir Anthony Panizzi, "K.C.B.;" "The Art of Michelangelo;" "Catalogue Raisonne of the Works of William Woollett;" "Collectors Marks," "Raphael's Sonnett;" etc., etc. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR. LONDON Bernard Quaritch, 15 PICCADILLY 1887.
Large 4vo. 1fep with frontis illustration of the Reform Club library on verso. The Title page in red and black text. The verso with a printers device. List of Illustrtions. [1] (1)vi-viii List of 143 illustrations. 1 page Preface by Louis Fagan. [1] (1)2-143. [1] (1)ii-xiii Index. [1] 1fep. Except for a little water-staining on the borders of the frontis, everything as new. The cover has been very sympathetically rebound recently in the same blue cloth cover as the original and the original gilt lettering on boards and spine. Almost as new.
- The 19th century brought an explosion in the popularity of gentlemen's clubs, particularly around the 1880s. At their height, London had over 400 such establishments. This expansion can be explained in part by the large extensions of the franchise in the Reform Acts of 1832, 1867, and 1885. Each time, hundreds of thousands more men were qualified to vote, and it was common for them to feel that they had been elevated to the status of a gentleman, thus they sought a club. The existing clubs, with strict limits on membership numbers and long waiting lists, were generally wary of such newly enfranchised potential members, and so these people began forming their own clubs. Each of the three great Reform Acts corresponded with a further expansion of clubs, as did a further extension of the franchise in 1918. Many of these new, more inclusive clubs proved just as reluctant as their forebears to admit new members when the franchise was further extended. An increasing number of clubs were characterised by their members' interest in politics, literature, sport, art, automobiles, travel, particular countries, or some other pursuit. In other cases, the connection between the members was membership of the same branch of the armed forces, or the same school or university. Thus, the growth of clubs provides an indicator as to what was considered a respectable part of the Establishment at the time. There are perhaps some 25 traditional London gentlemen's clubs of particular note, from The Arts Club to White's, Brooks etc. The Reform Club on the south side of Pall Mall in central London was founded on February 2nd 1836 by Edward Ellice, Member of Parliament for Coventry and Whig Whip, whose riches came from the Hudson's Bay Company, but whose zeal was chiefly devoted to securing the passage of the Reform Act 1832. Significantly, The Reform Club it was the first to change its rules to include the admission of women on equal terms in 1981. It also attracts a significant number of foreign members, such as diplomats accredited to the Court of St. James's. The Reform was known for the quality of its cuisine. Its first chef being Alexis Soyer, the first celebrity chef and cookery book author. He was followed by Charles Elme Francatelli, a former Head Chef of Queen Victoria. This a very handsome copy printed when the Club was at its height.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11209

Farley.   John    
The London Art of Cookery,
AND HOUSEKEEPER'S COMPLETE ASSISTANT. On a NEW PLAN. Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of every HOUSEKEEPER, COOK, and SERVANT in the Kingdom. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for the Choice of all Kinds of Provisions. Roasting and Boiling all Sorts of Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes. Made Dishes, Ragouts, and Fricasses. All Sorts of Pies and Puddings. Proper Instruction for dressing of Fruits and Vegetables. Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. The Prepeartion of Hams, Tongues, and Bacon. The whole Art of Confectionary. The Preparation of Sugars. Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries. Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies. Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To which is added, AN APPENDIX, Cotaining Considerations on Culinary Poisins; Directions for making Broths, &c. for the Sick; a List of Things in Season in the different Months of the Year; Marketing Tables, &c. &c. Embeliched with A HEAD of the AUTHOR, and a Bill of Fare for every Month in the Year, elegantly engraved on Thirteen Copper-plates. By JOHN FARLEY, PRINCIPAL COOK AT THE LONDON TAVERN. LONDON: The THIRD EDITION, With the Addition of upwards of One Hundred and Fifty new and elegant Receipts in the various Branches of Cookery. Printed for J. SCATCHERED and J. WHITTAKER, No.12, B. LAW, No. 13 Ava Maria Lane; and G. and T. WILKIE, St. Paul’s Church-Yard. 1785. [Price Six Shillings Bound.]
8vo. 1fep. [1] Engraved Frontispiece of Farley - Publish'd Jan 1. 1785 ---. Title page. [1] 4p Preface with facsimile signature of Farley. 2p Advertisement to the third edition. 24p Contents. 12 engraved plates of Bills of Fare with the back blank. (1)2-444. 445-448 Marketing Table. 1fep. Full mid-brown contemporary calf with a nice patina. The spine with raised bands and panels gilt lines and gilt writing. Oil stains to p255-264. Very slightly age browned, otherwise very nice internally. A good copy of an early edition.
- Farley's place of employment, The London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street was the largest restaurant and banqueting facility in the City. It held functions for up to two thousand, five hundred people at a sitting. In PPC 42 & 43, Fiona Lucraft lays out a very comprehensive and compelling piece of research that rightly condemns Farley of devious and outright plagiarism and proves that most of The London Art of Cookery has been taken straight from the cookery books of Hannah Glasse and Elizabeth Raffald. Nevertheless one gets a sense from Farley’s book that he was a very good professional cook proud of his high standards. He is one of the first English cooks to express (so typical of the French for more than a century) a continuing need for progress and improvement in the culinary arts. Farley in his introduction states with some pride that -- 'Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and, though the Cooks of the last Century boasted of having brought it to the highest Pitch it could bear, yet we find that daily improvements are still making therein, which must be the Case of every Art depending on Fancy and Taste: ---’ Farley appears to have very high standards of cleanliness and safety, repeatedly stressing in his book, the need for saucepans to be both clean and well tinned and he has an appendix on ‘culinary poisons’, particularly the risk of copper poisoning, which can happen when the tin wears down and exposes the copper underneath to foodstuffs. Whatever Fiona Lutcraft's excellent article in PPC proves, this is still an exceptional cookery book and gives a very good idea of the foods and dishes available at a highly reputed establishment.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11136

Farley.   John     - The rare first edition
The London Art of Cookery,
AND HOUSEKEEPER'S COMPLETE ASSISTANT. On a NEW PLAN. Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of every HOUSEKEEPER, COOK, and SERVANT in the Kingdom. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for the Choice of all Kinds of Provisions. Roasting and Boiling all Sorts of Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes. Made Dishes, Ragouts, and Fricasses. All Sorts of Pies and Puddings. Proper Instruction for dressing of Fruits and Vegetables. Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. The Prepeartion of Hmas, Tongues, and Bacon. The whole Art of Confectionary. Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries. Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies. Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To which is added, AN APPENDIX, Cotaining Considerations on Culinary Poisins; Directions for making Broths, &c. for the Sick; a List of Things in Season in the different Months of the Year; Marketing Tables, &c. &c. Embeliched with A HEAD of the AUTHOR, and a Bill of Fare for every Month in the Year, elegantly engraved on Thirteen Copper-plates. By JOHN FARLEY, PRINCIPAL COOK AT THE LONDON TAVERN. LONDON: Printed for JOHN FEILDING, No.23, Pater-noster Row; and J. SCAT-CHERD and J. WHITTAKER, No.12, Ava Maria Lane, 1783. [Price Six Shillings Bound.]
FIRST EDITION. 1783. 3feps. [1]Engraved Frontispiecs of Farley - Publish'd Jan 1. 1783 ---. Title page. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface with facsimile signature of Farley. (1)viii-xx Contents. 12 engraved plates of Bills of Fare. (1)2-455. 456-459 Marketing Table. [1] 3feps. Full dark brown modern calf with blind tooling to the edge of the boards. The spine with raised bands and panels with gilt dentelles and enclosed gilt lines. Two labels, one red, one green with gilt writing. Water stains to the frontis and title page not affecting the text, nor Farley's portrait. Otherwise very clean internally. A lovely copy.
- Towards the end of the eighteenth century, large taverns had become fashionable banqueting places for gentlemen in London. This was reflected by their chefs and their published cookery books; This book by John Farley, Principal Cook at the London Tavern. Also Richard Brigg’s, ‘The English Art of Cookery’ from the Globe Tavern, Fleet St, the White Hart Tavern, Holburn and at the Temple Coffee House. Not forgetting Francis Collingwood and John Woolams, ‘The Universal Cook,’ from the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand. Farley's place of employment, The London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street was the largest restaurant and banqueting facility in the City. It held functions for up to two thousand five hundred people at a sitting. In E. Callow's book on 'Old London Taverns - 1901 & J. Timbs 'Clubs of London' 1872, we learn that the establishment was 'par excellence' and the 'temple of gastronomy' in London. It did not have a bar nor coffee house, with a facade so large and discreet that many people thought it was the Bank of England. It had a prodigious cellar that stretched to both sides lengthways, even under the neighbouring buildings and far out in the front under Bishopsgate Street itself. It held among its huge stock hundreds of barrels of Porter, butts of Sherry, 4,300 dozen bottles of port, 1,200 dozen Champagne, walls of bottled Claret six deep, etc etc. We are informed that the floors of the cellars were a river of sawdust. Also in a huge tank in the cellar that occupied a whole vault, we find two tons of live turtle. We are informed that they can keep in excellent condition for three months if kept in the same water in which they were brought to the country. We learn that to change the water to that available here lessens the weight and flavour of the Turtle. We can find in Farley's book tips and information on how he grew mushrooms in the cellars. What a place to work! The kitchen brigade must have been huge, the wage bill for the whole Tavern - a small fortune each week. In PPC 42 & 43, Fiona Lucraft lays out a very comprehensive and compelling piece of research that rightly condemns Farley of devious and outright plagiarism and proves that most of The London Art of Cookery has been taken straight from the cookery books of Hannah Glasse and Elizabeth Raffald. Nevertheless one gets a sense from Farley’s book that he was a very good professional cook proud of his high standards. He is one of the first English cooks to express (so typical of the French for more than a century) a continuing need for progress and improvement in the culinary arts. Farley in his introduction states with some pride that -- 'Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and, though the Cooks of the last Century boasted of having brought it to the highest Pitch it could bear, yet we find that daily improvements are still making therein, which must be the Case of every Art depending on Fancy and Taste: ---’ Farley appears to have very high standards of cleanliness and safety, repeatedly stressing in his book, the need for saucepans to be both clean and well tinned and he has an appendix on ‘culinary poisons’, particularly the risk of copper poisoning, which can happen when the tin wears down and exposes foodstuffs to the copper underneath. Whatever Fiona Lutcraft's excellent article in PPC proves, this is still an exceptional cookery book and gives a very good idea of the foods and dishes available at a highly reputed establishment. One has to assume that as Farley brought out his very popular book that ran to many editions, albeit, some of it plagarised, he also cooked and served a large percentage of the recipes at The London Tavern. As a footnote; the first luxury restaurant to open in Paris paid homage to Farley’s place of work. In 1782 - ‘La Grande Taverne de Londres,’ was founded. The owner, Antoine Beauvilliers, a leading culinary writer and gastronomic authority, later wrote L’Art du cuisinier (1814), a cookbook that became a standard work on French culinary art. This book on offer here is the extremely rare first edition, and is equally as rare as the first editions of Glasse and Raffald.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11035

Farley.   John & Co-Partners.     - Superlatively rare, signed by Farley and two other directors.
An original Indenture for the London Tavern signed by John Farley the famous cook.
Signed individually by all parties, for “ a new partnership in the trade and business of a Vintner of and in the said House and Tavern called the London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street aforesaid for the Term of Seven Years”.
Two large vellum sheets - 711 x 838mm. Folded in typical indenture folds for filing and storage with top outer part showing in fine ink script, dated 1800 and Farley, Terry and Peacock’s names and their ‘Articles of Co-Partnership’. The exterior fold has some light soiling and browning to one outer edge where its has been stored on a shelf for many years, but internally its very clean. The beginning of the indenture has a large elaborate heading in ink and a good cursive hand is evident throughout the whole manuscript. The signatures of Farley, Terry and Peacock are at the bottom, each with a small red seal. Overall an excellent item.
- John Farley was the well-known Head Cook of the London Tavern whose famous cookery book ‘The London Art of Cookery’ was first published in 1783. When he started and finished his tenure there is hard to establish. We do know that his time at the London Tavern extended for many years, and he played a large role in its fine reputation and success. In Old Bailey trial accounts for the 16th September 1795, it is recorded that a man, Clark Hillard, was indicted on August the 4th for stealing from the London Tavern. The accusers, named as the directors of the Tavern, were John Bleadon, John Farley, Edward Terry and John Henry Peacock. Five years later John Bleadon has left and the three remaining directors have re-applied for, and been granted this Vintner’s licence on August 8th 1800, for a period of seven years at a cost of £1500.oo per annum. The document further states that the directors were fined £400.oo for letting the licence lapse on the June 29th of the same year. It appears the variance in lapse dates happened because John Bleadon had stepped down as a director. The license also notes that if there is going to be a change in the future Vintners partnership it should be done by the fourth year of its term. In John Timb’s book ‘Club Life of London’ we are informed The London Tavern was re-built on the western side of Bishops-gate Street Within on the site of the former White Lion Tavern, which burned down on November 7th 1765. It was completed by Richard B. Jupp, architect, and opened in September 1768. Taking up a large footprint on the site of the current Royal Bank of Scotland PLC, the Tavern was a huge building, 80ft wide and 70ft tall. It boasted many private dining rooms and a very large public room; the Great Dining Room or 'Pillar Room', measuring 40x33 feet. On the floor above was the Ballroom measuring 33 feet in width and extending the whole length of the building. This room could also be converted to a banqueting room that would hold 300 dining guests. The room also had two galleries at each end to allow 150 ladies as spectators. An unusual concept!? After doing further research I could not find any other facts that confirmed this was a common setup in other eating establishments. This strengthens though, the fact that dining out in Taverns and Clubs was the domain of men only. (This setup would only be truly broken when Cesar Ritz designed and run his famous Hotels in the latter part of the nineteenth century for the exclusive comfort of women, in the sure and very astute understanding that when the women came to dine, the men would follow, with the inevitable desire to book rooms as well.) Not only did the London Tavern have many floors, it also had many levels in its basement, which even stretched under the adjoining buildings on both sides. One of basement floors had a number of huge vats installed, that each held two tons of live Turtles. We are further informed that if the Turtles are kept in the same water as they were shipped in they will survive very well for 3 months. To change the water would lessen the weight and flavour of the animal. This beautifully written Vintners license covered a huge cellar. Timb’s description states that the cellar covered one huge basement storey, filled with barrels of Porter, pipes of Port, butts of Sherry etc. There were labyrinth walls of bottles and a huge region of bins, six bottles deep; described as the catacombs of Johannisberg, Tokay and Burgandy. Also in storage, 1200 Champagne, 700 Claret and thousands of genial wines. We are informed those wines also absorb an interest of 5% per annum. All over this vast wine store Timb’s quaintly describes “floors with rivers of sawdust”. The final chapter in the story of The London Tavern happened around 1910 when it was demolished. After 142 years of being one of the most famous and prestigious grand City restaurants, its name was appropriated by the proprietors of the nearby King's Head Tavern in Fenchurch St. Finally, this exceptionally rare, large Indenture is a fantastic piece of ephemera, not only because of Falrley’s rare signature, but as a glimpse of what a serious business it was to be granted and hold a Vintners license in eighteenth century England.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11217

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - signed by author & editor Herman Senn.
The Modern Cook
BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI EDITED BY C. HERMAN SENN. G.C.A. MACMILLAN AND CO. LIMITED ST. MARTIN'S STREET, LONDON 1911
12mo. 1fep. Half Title page. [1] Title page. With a signed handwritten dedication 'To Mr C.L. Rothsay. with C Herman Senn's best wishes and kindest regards CHS. Jan 1/19/12. [1] v-vi Preface. vii-viii Introduction. ix-xi Contents. [1] 1-471. [1] 473-508 Specimen Menus. 509-513 Wine Cups. 513=519 Glossary. [1] 521-546 Index. 1p Advertisement. [1] 1fep. Full red cloth binding with gilt writing on the spine. Overall clean but with cracked and rubbed edges. Internally very clean.
- Herman Senn was a very under-rated author and prolific writer of cookery books and one of the founders of the Universal Cookery and Food Association - UCFA. A hugely influential member of the English catering industry at that time. This is a late edition of Francatelli's classic cookery book edited and signed by Senn and as such is an unusual collectors copy.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11128

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - In amazing original condition.
The Cook's Guide and Housekeeper's & Butler's Assistant;
A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON ENGLISH AND FOREIGN COOKERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES; CONTAINING PLAIN INSTRUCTIONS FOR PICKLING AND PRESERVING VEGETABLES, FRUITS, GAME, &C, The Curing of Hams and Bacon; THE ART OF CONFECTIONARY AND ICE-MAKING, AND THE ARRANGEMENT OF DESSERTS. WITH VALUABLE DIRECTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF PROPER DIET FOR INVALIDS; ALSO FOR A VARIETY OF WINE-CUPS; AND EPICUREAN SALADS, AMERICAN DRINKS, AND SUMMER BEVERAGES. BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI. PUPIL OF THE CELEBRATED CAREME, SEVEN YEARS CHEF DE CUISINE TO THE REFORM CLUB, AND MAITRE-D'HOTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" WITH UPWARDS OF FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS. FIFTY-THIRD THOUSAND. LONDON; RICHARD BENTLEY & SON, NEW BURLINGTON STREET, PUBLISHERS IN ORDINARY TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 1884. (ALL Right Reserved)
175x125mm. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece. Title page with tissue guard. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface. (1)viii Illustrations.(1)x-xx Contents. (1)2-463. [1] 465-496 Bills of Fare. 497-500 Glossary. 501-524 Index. 1fep. Fully bound in pristine original chocolate brown cloth with ornamental black tooling all over and bright gilt writing on the spine. Speckled edges. In extra fine condition, almost as new, with very slight foxing on the frontis.
- Charles Elmé Francatelli was English by nationality. He wrote several important cookbooks, and held one of the most prestigious cooking positions in England at that time. In 1840 or 1841, he started work for Queen Victoria as Maitre d'Hotel and 'Chief Cook in Ordinary' at Windsor, staying there for four years. This is a late edition of Francatelli's 'Cook's Guide' which are not uncommon. What makes this copy so desirable is the remarkable original condition. What one wonders when seeing this book, is where has it been kept for the last 125 years. A fine collector's item or very nice present.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11145

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     - A very rare American edition.
FRANCATELLI'S COOKERY BOOK.
A PLAIN COOKERY BOOK FOR THE WORKING CLASSES BY CHARLES ELME FRAMCATELLI LATE CHEIF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN . AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" AND "THE COOK'S GUIDE."LONDON GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL - NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.
170mm x 108mm. n/d. Inner cover and 1 fep covered in advertisements. [1] Frontispiece on verso. Title page. [1] (1)10-11 Introduction. [1] (1)14-101. (1)103-105 Index. [1] (1)4-20 Avertisements. 1 fep and and back cover page covered in advertisements. Very clean original hard boards covered with green cloths with fine intricate black blind stamped tooling of a typical Victorian design. Overall the boards, spine and interior in very fine condition.
- This undated American version appears to be even rarer than the English edition of Francatelli's 'Cookery Book for the Working Classes.' COPAC shows only one 2nd edition of Francatelli's 'Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes' held at the University of London. This edition has the same English printer and publisher as the English 'Working Classes' edition but has the Broome St, New York address added. Also the Routledge advertisements pasted to the back cover has an American Library of US authors, even having titles by Mark Twain. With its hard cover as opposed to the softer cheaper covers of the English editions and its slightly larger format, this copy has been subtly altered to suit a slightly more affluent society. It is formatted exactly the same as the English version, with the same page numbers and recipes. One gets the impression that Routledge just tried to see if the very popular English version rebound to suit the US market would prove to be as popular. As it is so rare to find a copy, one then assumes not many were sold nor printed. In fifty years of collecting I have seen just two English copies and only this one US copy. None are recorded in any of the bibliographies. Very rare indeed.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11218

Francatelli.   Charles Elme     -Very rare book with equally rare Francatelli ephemera
A PLAIN COOKERY BOOK FOR THE WORKING CLASSES.
BY CHARLES ELME FRANCATELLI, LATE MAITRE D'HOTEL AND CHIEF COOK TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. AUTHOR OF "THE MODERN COOK" AND "THE COOK'S GUIDE." LONDON; GEORGE ROUTELEDGE AND SONS, THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE. 2. A 4 PAGE PAMPHLET FOR ROBINSON'S "PATENT" GROATS. BY THE LATE C.E. FRANCATELLI, ex MAITRE d'HOTEL TO HER LATE MAJESTY.
FIRST EDITION - 1862: 154x101x10mm. 12mo. A tipped-in new end-paper and fep. 4p. Advertisements. [1] Frontispiece. Title page. [1] (1)10-11 Introduction. [1] (1)14-101. (1)103-105. [1] p22 Advertisements. A tipped-in new fep and end-paper. Original cloth cover with blue printed lettering. A little soiled but still legible. Housed in a clam-shell box, dark brown half calf with matching brown cloth boards and calf corners. Raised bands with gilt lines. Two labels, green and red with gilt lettering. A rare copy in the original state. ITEM 2. 134x83mm. 4 cream coloured pages. Direction for use. Two of the four pages are recipes by Francatelli. Condition as new.
- In 1852, Francatelli got the food company Brown and Polson to be a sponsor of this book. In return, he gave Brown and Polson space for a large advertisement at the back, and mentioned their products by name in several of the recipes. This little volume is by far the scarcest of all Francatelli's books. It was a novel and astute idea for a popular cookery book, and was very popular with poorer people who could not afford the recipes of the cook books recording the abundant consumption of the landed gentry in their great houses. In 1854, Soyer published his equally famous little book 'A Shilling Cookery for the People' that one suspects was his response and reaction to the popularity of Francatelli's original effort, which also became over time much scarcer than Soyer's. It is easy to see why. The delicate stitching, the easily soiled covers coupled with the relative simplicity of the recipes, plus the fact they were viewed as booklets rather than books, ensured they were not overly valued. Most likely stored badly in a kitchen drawer or shelf and not considered worthy of a place of relative safety next more expensive and cherished books. This is reflected in the fact that they are very rare in the complete state and much valued by collectors. Giving this item more value is the small 4 pages of recipes by Francatelli for groats. These four pages of ephemera, especially the two pages with Francalli's recpes are as collectable as finding one of his menus or one of his books with signature. This is as rare as the enclosed cookery book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10958