Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - A very rare item.
One of Escoffier and Charles Scotto's Menus, .
From the Hamburg Amerika liner S.S. Imperator. June 23rd 1914.
180x158 mm. 4 pages. The front cover of the menu is an unusual birds-eye view of New York Harbour with S.S. Imperator steaming towards the Statue of Liberty and skyline of N.Y. in a circle. Beautifully observed and painted. 1st page, A farwell Dinner. Nice big menu written in English and German with eleven courses of French and American dishes. On the verso of the 3rd page, a music programme. Overall in very good condition and housed in a handsome cardboard folder covered in crimson marbled paper with a label on the front cover. A rare item of Escoffier and Charles Scotto ephemera.
- In 1912 the Hamburg Amerika line again requested Escoffier’s services for the planning and inauguration of the kitchens on the brand new 53,000 ton liner, S.S. Imperator. Escoffier had previously planned and opened in 1905, the kitchens and dining rooms of the liners S.S. Amerika and S.S. Kaiserin Auguste Victoria. The new restaurants had been a stunning success. Those a'la carte restaurant services on board all of those liners were called the “The Ritz Carlton Restaurants”. On the Imperator, Escoffier brought his famous pupil, Charles Scotto to be the Head Chef. The official trial cruise was to have an illustrious passenger; Emperor William. On the 8th July 1912, the Emperor boarded and they weighed anchor immediately and set sail towards Heligoland. On the last day of the Emperor’s stay on board He had a conversation with Escoffier. He thanked him for taking responsibility for the cuisine and how delighted He had been at the level of comfort He had experienced on board. In August 1914, as World War I began, the S.S. Imperator was laid up at Hamburg and remained inactive for more than four years until 1918. This menu is a ‘Farewell Dinner’ dated June 23rd 1914. It is not inconceivable that it is a part of the overall farewells of many people associated with this great ship. It is also rare to be able to tie down a Charles Scotto menu. He was to become one of the leading Chefs of the early American Culinary associations and schools. Becoming as famous there as his Master. Ref: Herbodeau and Thalman’s fine autobiography of Escoffier’s life.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11213

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - Two Escoffier menus.
Ritz Carlton Restaurants on board the Hamburg Amerika Line ships.
A Lunch and Dinner menu from the S.S. Amerika passenger liner, March 1908.
Menu 1. Dinner dated March 14th 1908 - 177x117 mm. A folded card with a very good drawing of the SS Amerika on the front cover. Inside a 12 course dinner in English and German with French and a few US dishes. On the back cover is the music programme with a lovely drawing of a violinist. Clean and handsome. Menu 2. Lunch dated March 12th 1908 - 130x90 mm. . A folded card with a header titled ‘A Suggestion' on the front cover. Inside a plain 6 course lunch in English and German. On the back cover are a couple of glue strips that suggest this menu was pasted into a folder at some time. All text and menu borders in gilt. The guttering has been strengthened but still a clean and handsome item. Overall in very good condition and housed in a handsome cardboard folder covered in grey marbled paper with a label on the front cover. A rare item of Escoffier ephemera.
- The Hamburg Amerika Liner company requested Auguste Escoffier and Cesar Ritz’s services for the planning and inauguration of the Kitchens and Restaurants on the brand new liners "S.S. Amerika" and the 'S.S. Kaiserin Auguste Victoria. Both of these ships were built side by side at the Harland Wolff shipyards in Belfast. 'Amerika' was launched first on April 20th 1905, According to the Morton Allan Directory of European Passenger Steamship Arrivals (Baltimore: 1987), the “S.S. Amerika" sailed between Hamburg and New York from 1905-1913. For the year 1914 it sailed between Hamburg and Boston; the Amerika's last U.S. arrivals were to Boston on 19 June and 24 July 1914. In 1912, it was the first ship to warn Titanic of icebergs. The kitchens and dining rooms of the liners S.S. Amerika and S.S. Kaiserin Auguste Victoria opened with the very original a la carte restaurants. The service on board all of those liners was called the “The Ritz Carlton Restaurants”. There had never been an a’la Cartre restaurant of any kind on a ship before. Adding the names of Escoffier and Ritz to this novel enterprise and the interest, support and demand completely filled the dining rooms every day. The new restaurants became stunning successes. They even had to significantly expand the kitchen of the 'S.S. Kaiserin Auguste Victoria' after the first voyage. Escoffier’s secondment from the Carlton Hotel to the Hamburg Amerika line was to last until 1915 and would further help to cement his reputation as the gastronomic Master craftsman of the age.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11214

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - 2 Escoffier menus, one hand-written by him.
Framed menus; Carlton Hotel, London.
A draft menu hand-written by Escoffier, undated, and another Escoffier menu, but written by another hand in cursive script, dated 1908. Both menus are from Escoffier's tenure at the Carlton Hotel, London.
Enclosed in a glass fronted gold framed picture 322mm x 378mm. The menu in the cursive script is on display. Escoffier's hand written menu is taped under plastic on the back of the picture. All in fine condition. Very rare.
- The very rare draft menu written by Escoffier in his typically messy scrawl would have then been sent to a comptroller who writes on the menu, the date and the name of the recipient of the special Dinner, as seen on this one in blue crayon. It is then sent to someone (probably in the Food & Beverage department) to be written properly and sent to the client. In this case, written in ink in a beautiful hand. Another would be written and then posted in the kitchen on the banquet notice board one week before the dinner. It appears that the letter may be written for the client, a Mrs Williams. But I think this one has come from the Kitchen itself, possibly Escoffier’s office. There were three lots in the auction from where these two items came. All lots were similar with written menus in Escoffier’s hand and menus written on Carlton Hotel headed paper in the same beautiful hand as this one. Also some Carte du Jour menus were in the lots. (See also item # 10980. The written menu by Escoffier, and a Carte du Jour menu as well, all from Escoffier’s time at the Carlton). These two items here are very rare Ephemera and give an interesting glimpse of the way the process works from Escoffier’s office to the client to the Kitchen to the eventual meal served and placed in front of the guests.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11219

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - Extremely Rare.
An original b/w photograph of Auguste Escoffier.
SITTING WITH HIS FULL KITCHEN BRIGADE. 1905.
320 mm long x 153 mm high. Under the photograph is a small cut out of the original mount, stating; The Carlton Hotel. 1905. The photograph is mounted on a black cardboard border and covered by glass and bordered with a black and silver frame. One of his most famous pupils; Charles Scotto, sits in the photograph fourth from the left on the second row. Pasted on the back is the original photographer’s name in gilt, cut from the mount before it was framed. It was by Fradelle & Young, 283 Regents St. London W.1. They specialised in hotel and restaurant group photography of dinners, receptions & full kitchen brigades. ITEM 2. See image # 5. below. For reference; I requested a scan done by the framers of the original large photograph used. It shows in full a large ugly part of the Carlton Hotel roof, which was cut out before framing.
- This rare original photograph of Auguste Escoffier and his kitchen brigade, was taken on the roof of the Carlton Hotel 1905. A casual glance at this old image belies the contemporary history that Escoffier brought about by very hard work, his great extensive writings, his organisational skills, and a huge passion to improve the lot of his beloved chefs. It is one of the reasons why he is held in such high esteem, and a feeling of deep gratitude lies in the hearts of most well trained modern chefs, because his updated re-organisation of the large Kitchen brigade is still the way modern kitchens are organised. The following list is of the different members and departments of his large kitchen brigade system. Only the largest of hotels like the Carlton Hotel had this fully staffed brigade (54 people in this photograph) with all the following departments fully functioning. Escoffier devised this system, primarily during his time at the Savoy Hotel London, before going to the Carlton from 1899 to 1919. This very efficient organisation allowed sincere chefs to learn all the important skills of every department in the largest kitchen brigades. Staring at the top was the MAITRE-CHEF de CUISINE (literally translated; "Master Chef") Responsible for overall management of kitchen; supervises staff, creates menus and new recipes with the assistance of the restaurant manager, makes purchases of raw food items, trains apprentices, and maintains a sanitary and hygienic environment for the preparation of food. SOUS-CHEF de CUISINE (deputy head chef; literally "sub-chief") Receives orders directly from the chef de cuisine for the management of the kitchen, and often serves as the representative when the chef de cuisine is not present. Does not usually work on the stove anymore. In a big brigade there can be as many as 4-6 sous-chefs. CHEF de PARTIE (senior chef of a department) Responsible for managing a department in the kitchen, specializing in preparing particular dishes there. CHEF TOURNANT (Can be a Chef de partie in any department) The most experienced, having trained as a Chef de partie in every department. Will cover for any Chef de partie on their days off or holidays. Usually fills any vacancy for the Sous-chef’s position. CHEF SAUCIER (Chef de partie of the sauce dept.) Prepares all meat sauces and stocks and completes meat dishes. This is one of the most respected positions in the kitchen brigade. CHEF ROTTISEUR (Chef de partie of the roast department.) Manages a team of cooks that roasts, broils, and deep fries dishes. CHEF POISSONNIER (Chef de partie of the fish department.) Prepares all fish and seafood dishes and fish sauces and stocks. Usually has a fishmonger in the department. CHEF ENTREMETIER (Chef de partie of vegetable and farinaceous department.) Prepares all vegetables, soups and egg dishes. CHEF GARDE-MANAGER (Chef de partie of the cold larder.) Responsible for preparation of cold hors d'oeuvres, pâtés, terrines and aspics; prepares salads; organizes large buffet displays; and prepares charcuterie items. Usually the largest staffed department in the kitchen. CHEF PATTISIER (Chef de partie of pastry department.) Prepares desserts and other meal-end sweets, ices, cakes, petit-fours, pulled sugar works, also has a ‘boulanger’, preparing breads and other baked items; may also prepare pasta for the restaurant. BOUCHER (the butcher) Butchers meats, poultry, prepare meats for the Garde manger’s pates and terrines. Clean all game ready for roasting. May also be in charge of breading meats. CUISINIER (cook) May also be referred to as a cuisinier de partie. Also known as a ‘demi-chef de partie’ who takes over from the Chef de partie on his days off. COMMIS (junior cook) Works in a specific partie, but reports directly to the chef de partie. Can also be 2nd or 3rd commis depending on age and experience. The Chef de cuisine changes their departments annually to give them all round experience of all ‘parties’. APPRENTIE (apprentice.) Often students gaining theoretical and practical training, in school and work experience in the kitchen. They perform preparatory work under a Chef de Partie. PLONGEUR or MARMITON (dishwasher or kitchen porter.) cleans dishes and utensils, and may be entrusted with basic preparatory jobs. ABOYEUR (announcer/expediter) During the meal service times takes the orders from the dining room waiters and distributes them to the various departments; the role usually performed by the Sous-chef. CHEF COMMUNARD Prepares the meal served to the restaurant staff. GARCON de CUISINE (literally ‘kitchen boy’) In larger establishments, performs preparatory and auxiliary work for support. This photograph gives an insight into how many chefs are employed in the large well known luxury hotels. The range of skills that have to be mastered is huge. A commis chef's apprenticeship usually lasted up to 7 years. Even after that, a lot of chefs move to other well known establishments to gain more experience. Indeed a great chef's career path is always dictated by quality and reputation. Because the initial years as an apprentice is so tough and very focused on improving skills, they never lose the desire to learn. As a foot note and interestingly, in all photographs I have viewed of Escoffier sitting with his full kitchen brigades, (and they were done annually) He always sat sideways to the direct camera angle. Curious.!

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11230

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     Uniquely rare.
Menus and recipes signed by Escoffier.
Two menus with recipes signed and annotated with one page also initialized by Escoffier and a single recipe from the Guide Culinaire in Escoffier's typical messy hand writing. Also one page of unusual Ephemera signed twice.
Comprising: 4 different items protected in separate plastic sleeves. All housed in a marbled folder with label. -- ITEM 1. 1page. 222 x 153mm. n.d. Recipe for ‘Boeuf en Miroton’, [circa.1903] written in Escoffier’s distinctive handwriting. Comprising 18 lines outlining the recipe with a comment beneath (‘J’avais oublié ce bon Miroton’), with other annotations in pencil, and blue crayon in another hand. The page appears to be extracted from a notebook. (The recipe for Boeuf en Miroton appeared in Escoffier’s Le Guide Culinaire, 1st edition of 1903). Enclosed with one page of English translation. Very good condition. -- ITEM 2. 2 pages. 265 x 207mm. Stapled. nd. Small tear to top left corner of second page; A typed menu in very clear blue ink on well preserved thin yellow paper, initialled by Escoffier on page 1, and signed by him on page 2. The first page is a “Homage à BRILLAT SAVARIN; En souvenir des Diners de la Gentilhommière de Vieu”. The first page explaining the inspiration behind the menu; Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin and his cousin, Juliette Récamier. The second page giving an extravagant 9 course menu, commencing with Hors d’oeuvres, Caviar and Huîtres crûes en Gelée de Champagne. Enclosed with 2 pages of English translation. Very good condition. -- ITEM 3. 5 pages, 268 x 209mm. Stapled. nd. A typed menu and recipes in very clear black ink on well preserved thin white paper. Annotated and signed by Escoffier on page 5. A six course delightful dinner titled “LA PROVENCE; LES DELICES DE LA COTE D’AZUR; Pays des Rêyes dorés”. Given for ‘un personnage de nationalité anglaise’. The dishes including Melon de Cavaillon au Frontignan, Mignonettes d'Agneau de lait Mireille, and la Mousse Abricot de Rose de Monteux. Followed by all the recipes for the dishes. Enclosed with 5 pages of English translation. Very good condition. -- ITEM 4. 1 page of ephemera. 190x 125mm. An invoice or stock note headed: Aktiebolaget Svenska Handelsbanken, Stockholm, on blue paper, interestingly, signed twice by Escoffier. With his home address in Monte-Carlo. Dated 9th January 1933. Very good condition.
- Escoffier's very full life and literary output is well documented. His Hotel collaborations with Cesar Ritz, his restaurants on board famous ocean liners, his 'Escoffier Company' range of preserved and bottled foodstuffs, his colleagues and apprentices who became famous in their own right. The associations and foundations that sprang up in his memory after he died, attest to the deep affection and respect in which he was held. These enclosed items serve up a fine glimpse of the loving and detailed effort he put into these two private functions. It also helps to show why he was held in the highest regard. -- ITEM 1: Written in Escoffier’s hand but with no date. Obviously, it’s a page from a notebook, and as it is not dated, one may assume it was written before the first publication of the recipe in his ‘Guide Culinaire’ of 1903. Otherwise why would Escoffier re-write it when it is already published. A mystery.! -- ITEM 2: Escoffier informs us that this dinner took place in the lounge of the Table Francaise of the Restaurant Garnier on rue de l,Isly. He further states that being the President of the Society of the Table Francaise, whose headquarters were also on rue de l,Isly, he Escoffier, was asked to compose the menu. -- ITEM 3. A lunch served for an unnamed English gentleman in a private villa between Cannes and Monte-Carlo. Escoffier describes the setting for the lunch in quite descriptive and poetic terms. One can almost feel the warm winter sunshine and smell the Mimosa etc. To have a menu created by the Master with accompanying recipes, is rare. -- ITEM 4. This little invoice is a mystery. Dated 23 months before his death, one wonders where Escoffier signed for this. Surely not Stockholm but a branch of Aktiebolaget Svenska Handelsbanken near the Monte-Carlo or further afield in France perhaps.? A search of the bank’s history did not enlighten. It also appears that Escoffier signed and dated the invoice in the first instance, then signed it a second time as a complimentary gift to someone. Rare indeed with the two signatures. --- Due to Escoffier’s output as a prolific writer, signed letters are very scarce but not rare, but still fetching large amounts of money at auction. However, we can elevate to extreme rarity these signed menus with fine detailed recipes and descriptions, of the two private functions organised and recorded by the great man himself.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11249

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - With 2 very scare recipe booklets.
6 ITEMS OF ESCOFFIER RELATED EPHEMERA.
ITEM1. Wholesale Department:- RIDGEMONT STREET. (Off Shore Street) TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD, LONDON, WC. Inside it tells us: ESCOFFIER PREPARATIONS. Manufactured under the Supervision of MONS. ESCOFFIER. of the Carlton Hotel. London. With lists of all Escoffier items and prices. ITEM 2. A canned autobiography of Escoffier from the Foundation Auguste Escoffier. UN DES GRANDS MAITRES DE LA CUISINE FRANCAISE. 1846 - 1935. ITEM 3. A booklet of Escoffier recipes for a GUIDE de la CUISINIERE. Contenant de NOMBREUSES RECETTES NOUVELLES. Edite par le ~Bouillon "KUB". ITEM 4. A booklet of of Escoffier recipes for a A Chaque mois de l'Annee... ses viandes, poissins, volailles•gibiers, legumes. `Conseils et Recettes. La bonne cuisine par tous. ITEM 5. An original b/w photograph of the Carlton Hotel, Pall Mall, London. ITEM 6. A b/w photograph of Escoffier with top-hat viewing exhibits at a Salon Culinaire in London.
ITEM 1. A four-page promotional pamphlet: 237 x 143mm. Ornate front cover with a red jar of Escoffier Pickles. All items priced. Good condition. ITEM 2. 240 x 160mm. (1) With illustration of an older Escoffier. 4-9 The main dated milestones of key times in Escoffier's life. 10-49 with many unseen photographs of Escoffier and his kitchen brigades. Packed with many unknown facts from the Master's life. The covers and internally in fine condition. ITEM 3. 180 x 135mm. p1 Advertisement. Frontis on the Verso of a table laden with foods. A letter written by Escoffier dated Paris, Octobre 1922. p6. Termes Culinaires. 7-71. [1] Age dusted carboard covers and the front cover with text in red and ornate border. Internally clean. ITEM 4. 180 x 138mm. A rectangular booklet. Inside cover advertising 'Kub' Buillon. A title page of a letter date July 1st 1925. [1] p3. Du choix des plats de season. 1926. 4-31. Inside cover advertising 'Kub' et Poule au Pot'. `Dark blue cardboard covers with a little boy chef on the front. Fine condition. ITEM 5. A b/w photograph of Escoffier of the Carlton Hotel when Escoffier was the Chef de Cuisine. ITEM 6. A fine b/w photographs of Escoffier at a Salon Culinaire pasted to the insider page of the marbled cardboard folder housing all the items.
- Escoffier, (1846-1935) was not only a great and famous chef, but a little known fact was that he was also a relentless innovator, as can be seen by the large range of sauces, soups, pickles, consomme, vinegars etc (even the famous Sauce Melba) featured in the 4 page pamphlet of Escoffier Sauces. This came about because of his laudable belief that making life and kitchen tasks easier for the professional and the home cooks was an inevitable need and necessity, which he understood and very clearly stated in his great cookery classic 'Le Guide Culinaire'. Reading the preface of this great book we can see the practical, as well as his heartfelt understanding of people's constant desire for change was an ongoing negative human condition thro' the ages. Escoffier tried to explain that the secret to alleviating this restless innovation, will come about by cooking the timeless classics as well as possible, instead of the constant search for novelty. Probably the most lasting but least known food item that he developed and started producing on a large commercial scale, was tinned tomatoes. The other two rare booklets also pre-date a very modern trend of promoting processed food items aimed at the home cook. The autobiographical booklet is fascinating as a condensed look at Escoffier's life put together by the Escoffier foundation at 3, rue Auguste Escoffier. 06270 Villeneuve-Loubet Village and it's Chairman, Michel Escoffier, the great man's grandson. An unusual collection.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11317

Evelyn.   John     - The first book about Salads
Acetaria
A DISCOURSE OF SALLETS. By J.E. S.R.S. Author of the Kalendarium. [A quotation in Greek from the Greek dramatist, Cratinus] 'It is in every man's power to season well' LONDON, Printed for B. Tooke at the Middle-Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1699.
FIRST EDITION. 1fep. Title Page with double lined border. 20pp.Dedication. 10pp.Preface 6pp.The Plan of a Royal Garden. 1-192. 2pp. 2 Folding Tables between 108-109. The table facing p108 has been neatly repaired on the fold. 35pp.Appendix. 13pp.Table. 1pp.Errata. [1] 1fep. All pages uniformly browned as is usual with this paper. Title page and first page of the dedication backed with clear page tape without visual loss of text. Very nice early full mottled calf binding, raised bands with gilt lines, dark orange label with gilt lettering. With a nice aged patina. Very scarce to rare.
- John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a prolific writer and translator, touching on politics, manners, and religion as well as the more practical arts of architecture, painting and engraving, sculpture, numismatics, and perhaps what he is best known for (besides his diary) gardening and forestry. His most important original contributions are perhaps 'Sylva' which he composed at the behest of the Royal Society in 1664. Acetaria is but a chapter in 'Sylva' subtitled 'A Discourse of Sallets'. Part of Evelyn's literary knowledge of the garden were his translations of the French horticultural manual by Nicolas de Bonnefons and the garden poem (in Latin) by Renatus Rapinaus. Acetaria is certainly full of observations of how the English ways, either in the garden or at table, differed from French, Italian and Spanish - with occasional reference to India, Germany, Holland, Africa and America for good measure. The text also underscores the relative novelty of some aspects of the art of kitchen-gardening in England: we had much to learn by way of cultural techniques from the Dutch and the French, as well as plants that were of recent introduction, for example the Dutch cabbages brought over by Sir Anthony Ashley. His recipes for dressing salads is knowledgeable and interestingly not changed much in UK and Europe. Quite what Evelyn in his time, would have made of the myriad concoctions assembled to dress salads in America, and particularly in health obsessed California, one wonders. Due to the relative preparation of salads, where cooking is at a minimum, this book is quite ageless compared to other cookery books that mirror changing times.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10946

Fagan.   Louis     - An in-house look at Soyer's impact on the Reform Club.
1836 - 1886. The Reform Club:
ITS FOUNDERS AND ARCHITECT. BY LOUIS FAGAN, Of the Department of Prints and Drawings, the British Museum. Honorary Member of the Society of Engravers of France; Author of "The Life of Sir Anthony Panizzi, "K.C.B.;" "The Art of Michelangelo;" "Catalogue Raisonne of the Works of William Woollett;" "Collectors Marks," "Raphael's Sonnett;" etc., etc. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR. LONDON Bernard Quaritch, 15 PICCADILLY 1887.
Large 4vo. 1fep with frontis illustration of the Reform Club library on verso. The Title page in red and black text. The verso with a printers device. List of Illustrtions. [1] (1)vi-viii List of 143 illustrations. 1 page Preface by Louis Fagan. [1] (1)2-143. [1] (1)ii-xiii Index. [1] 1fep. Except for a little water-staining on the borders of the frontis, everything as new. The cover has been very sympathetically rebound recently in the same blue cloth cover as the original and the original gilt lettering on boards and spine. Almost as new.
- The 19th century brought an explosion in the popularity of gentlemen's clubs, particularly around the 1880s. At their height, London had over 400 such establishments. This expansion can be explained in part by the large extensions of the franchise in the Reform Acts of 1832, 1867, and 1885. Each time, hundreds of thousands more men were qualified to vote, and it was common for them to feel that they had been elevated to the status of a gentleman, thus they sought a club. The existing clubs, with strict limits on membership numbers and long waiting lists, were generally wary of such newly enfranchised potential members, and so these people began forming their own clubs. Each of the three great Reform Acts corresponded with a further expansion of clubs, as did a further extension of the franchise in 1918. Many of these new, more inclusive clubs proved just as reluctant as their forebears to admit new members when the franchise was further extended. An increasing number of clubs were characterised by their members' interest in politics, literature, sport, art, automobiles, travel, particular countries, or some other pursuit. In other cases, the connection between the members was membership of the same branch of the armed forces, or the same school or university. Thus, the growth of clubs provides an indicator as to what was considered a respectable part of the Establishment at the time. There are perhaps some 25 traditional London gentlemen's clubs of particular note, from The Arts Club to White's, Brooks etc. The Reform Club on the south side of Pall Mall in central London was founded on February 2nd 1836 by Edward Ellice, Member of Parliament for Coventry and Whig Whip, whose riches came from the Hudson's Bay Company, but whose zeal was chiefly devoted to securing the passage of the Reform Act 1832. Significantly, The Reform Club it was the first to change its rules to include the admission of women on equal terms in 1981. It also attracts a significant number of foreign members, such as diplomats accredited to the Court of St. James's. The Reform was known for the quality of its cuisine. Its first chef being Alexis Soyer, the first celebrity chef and cookery book author. He was followed by Charles Elme Francatelli, a former Head Chef of Queen Victoria. This a very handsome copy printed when the Club was at its height.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11209

Farley.   John     - The rare first edition
The London Art of Cookery,
AND HOUSEKEEPER'S COMPLETE ASSISTANT. On a NEW PLAN. Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of every HOUSEKEEPER, COOK, and SERVANT in the Kingdom. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for the Choice of all Kinds of Provisions. Roasting and Boiling all Sorts of Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes. Made Dishes, Ragouts, and Fricasses. All Sorts of Pies and Puddings. Proper Instruction for dressing of Fruits and Vegetables. Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. The Prepeartion of Hmas, Tongues, and Bacon. The whole Art of Confectionary. Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries. Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies. Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To which is added, AN APPENDIX, Cotaining Considerations on Culinary Poisins; Directions for making Broths, &c. for the Sick; a List of Things in Season in the different Months of the Year; Marketing Tables, &c. &c. Embeliched with A HEAD of the AUTHOR, and a Bill of Fare for every Month in the Year, elegantly engraved on Thirteen Copper-plates. By JOHN FARLEY, PRINCIPAL COOK AT THE LONDON TAVERN. LONDON: Printed for JOHN FEILDING, No.23, Pater-noster Row; and J. SCAT-CHERD and J. WHITTAKER, No.12, Ava Maria Lane, 1783. [Price Six Shillings Bound.]
FIRST EDITION. 1783. 3feps. [1]Engraved Frontispiecs of Farley - Publish'd Jan 1. 1783 ---. Title page. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface with facsimile signature of Farley. (1)viii-xx Contents. 12 engraved plates of Bills of Fare. (1)2-455. 456-459 Marketing Table. [1] 3feps. Full dark brown modern calf with blind tooling to the edge of the boards. The spine with raised bands and panels with gilt dentelles and enclosed gilt lines. Two labels, one red, one green with gilt writing. Water stains to the frontis and title page not affecting the text, nor Farley's portrait. Otherwise very clean internally. A lovely copy.
- Towards the end of the eighteenth century, large taverns had become fashionable banqueting places for gentlemen in London. This was reflected by their chefs and their published cookery books; This book by John Farley, Principal Cook at the London Tavern. Also Richard Brigg’s, ‘The English Art of Cookery’ from the Globe Tavern, Fleet St, the White Hart Tavern, Holburn and at the Temple Coffee House. Not forgetting Francis Collingwood and John Woolams, ‘The Universal Cook,’ from the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand. Farley's place of employment, The London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street was the largest restaurant and banqueting facility in the City. It held functions for up to two thousand five hundred people at a sitting. In E. Callow's book on 'Old London Taverns - 1901 & J. Timbs 'Clubs of London' 1872, we learn that the establishment was 'par excellence' and the 'temple of gastronomy' in London. It did not have a bar nor coffee house, with a facade so large and discreet that many people thought it was the Bank of England. It had a prodigious cellar that stretched to both sides lengthways, even under the neighbouring buildings and far out in the front under Bishopsgate Street itself. It held among its huge stock hundreds of barrels of Porter, butts of Sherry, 4,300 dozen bottles of port, 1,200 dozen Champagne, walls of bottled Claret six deep, etc etc. We are informed that the floors of the cellars were a river of sawdust. Also in a huge tank in the cellar that occupied a whole vault, we find two tons of live turtle. We are informed that they can keep in excellent condition for three months if kept in the same water in which they were brought to the country. We learn that to change the water to that available here lessens the weight and flavour of the Turtle. We can find in Farley's book tips and information on how he grew mushrooms in the cellars. What a place to work! The kitchen brigade must have been huge, the wage bill for the whole Tavern - a small fortune each week. In PPC 42 & 43, Fiona Lucraft lays out a very comprehensive and compelling piece of research that rightly condemns Farley of devious and outright plagiarism and proves that most of The London Art of Cookery has been taken straight from the cookery books of Hannah Glasse and Elizabeth Raffald. Nevertheless one gets a sense from Farley’s book that he was a very good professional cook proud of his high standards. He is one of the first English cooks to express (so typical of the French for more than a century) a continuing need for progress and improvement in the culinary arts. Farley in his introduction states with some pride that -- 'Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and, though the Cooks of the last Century boasted of having brought it to the highest Pitch it could bear, yet we find that daily improvements are still making therein, which must be the Case of every Art depending on Fancy and Taste: ---’ Farley appears to have very high standards of cleanliness and safety, repeatedly stressing in his book, the need for saucepans to be both clean and well tinned and he has an appendix on ‘culinary poisons’, particularly the risk of copper poisoning, which can happen when the tin wears down and exposes foodstuffs to the copper underneath. Whatever Fiona Lutcraft's excellent article in PPC proves, this is still an exceptional cookery book and gives a very good idea of the foods and dishes available at a highly reputed establishment. One has to assume that as Farley brought out his very popular book that ran to many editions, albeit, some of it plagarised, he also cooked and served a large percentage of the recipes at The London Tavern. As a footnote; the first luxury restaurant to open in Paris paid homage to Farley’s place of work. In 1782 - ‘La Grande Taverne de Londres,’ was founded. The owner, Antoine Beauvilliers, a leading culinary writer and gastronomic authority, later wrote L’Art du cuisinier (1814), a cookbook that became a standard work on French culinary art. This book of Farley's on view here is the extremely rare first edition, and is equally as rare as the first editions of Glasse and Raffald.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11035

Farley.   John    
The London Art of Cookery,
AND HOUSEKEEPER'S COMPLETE ASSISTANT. On a NEW PLAN. Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of every HOUSEKEEPER, COOK, and SERVANT in the Kingdom. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for the Choice of all Kinds of Provisions. Roasting and Boiling all Sorts of Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes. Made Dishes, Ragouts, and Fricasses. All Sorts of Pies and Puddings. Proper Instruction for dressing of Fruits and Vegetables. Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. The Prepeartion of Hams, Tongues, and Bacon. The whole Art of Confectionary. The Preparation of Sugars. Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries. Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies. Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To which is added, AN APPENDIX, Cotaining Considerations on Culinary Poisins; Directions for making Broths, &c. for the Sick; a List of Things in Season in the different Months of the Year; Marketing Tables, &c. &c. Embeliched with A HEAD of the AUTHOR, and a Bill of Fare for every Month in the Year, elegantly engraved on Thirteen Copper-plates. By JOHN FARLEY, PRINCIPAL COOK AT THE LONDON TAVERN. LONDON: The THIRD EDITION, With the Addition of upwards of One Hundred and Fifty new and elegant Receipts in the various Branches of Cookery. Printed for J. SCATCHERED and J. WHITTAKER, No.12, B. LAW, No. 13 Ava Maria Lane; and G. and T. WILKIE, St. Paul’s Church-Yard. 1785. [Price Six Shillings Bound.]
8vo. 1fep. [1] Engraved Frontispiece of Farley - Publish'd Jan 1. 1785 ---. Title page. [1] 4p Preface with facsimile signature of Farley. 2p Advertisement to the third edition. 24p Contents. 12 engraved plates of Bills of Fare with the back blank. (1)2-444. 445-448 Marketing Table. 1fep. Full mid-brown contemporary calf with a nice patina. The spine with raised bands and panels gilt lines and gilt writing. Oil stains to p255-264. Very slightly age browned, otherwise very nice internally. A good copy of an early edition.
- Farley's place of employment, The London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street was the largest restaurant and banqueting facility in the City. It held functions for up to two thousand, five hundred people at a sitting. In PPC 42 & 43, Fiona Lucraft lays out a very comprehensive and compelling piece of research that rightly condemns Farley of devious and outright plagiarism and proves that most of The London Art of Cookery has been taken straight from the cookery books of Hannah Glasse and Elizabeth Raffald. Nevertheless one gets a sense from Farley’s book that he was a very good professional cook proud of his high standards. He is one of the first English cooks to express (so typical of the French for more than a century) a continuing need for progress and improvement in the culinary arts. Farley in his introduction states with some pride that -- 'Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and, though the Cooks of the last Century boasted of having brought it to the highest Pitch it could bear, yet we find that daily improvements are still making therein, which must be the Case of every Art depending on Fancy and Taste: ---’ Farley appears to have very high standards of cleanliness and safety, repeatedly stressing in his book, the need for saucepans to be both clean and well tinned and he has an appendix on ‘culinary poisons’, particularly the risk of copper poisoning, which can happen when the tin wears down and exposes the copper underneath to foodstuffs. Whatever Fiona Lutcraft's excellent article in PPC proves, this is still an exceptional cookery book and gives a very good idea of the foods and dishes available at a highly reputed establishment.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11136