Coghan.   Thomas    
THE HAVEN OF HEALTH.
Cheifely gathered for the comfort of Students, and consequently of all those that have a care of their health; amplified upon five words of Hypocrates, written Epid.6. Labor, Cibus, Potie, Somnus, Venus. Hereunto is added, a preservation form the Pestilence, with a short censureof the late sickness in Oxford. By Thomas Coghan, Master of Arts, and Bachelor of Physicke. Ecclesiasicus oap.37.30. By surfeit have many perished: but he that dieteth himselfe prolongeth his life. The fourth Edition, corrected and amended. LONDON, Printed by Anne Griffin, for Roger Ball, and are to be sold at his shop without Temple-barre, at the Golden Anchor next the Nags-head Taverne. 1636.
Small 4to. 2feps with bookplates of Aldenham and W.G. Peene. Title page. [1] 8p Epistle Dedicatorie. 6p To the Reader. 1+2-321. [1] 22p The Table. 2feps. Modern quarter calf with marbled boards, slightly rubbed. Spine with gilt lines and black label with gilt lettering. Title page age darkened. Some soiling and marginal damp-staining. C1 defective with lower outer portion torn. Closed tear to E4. Lower outer corner of H3 torn without loss of text. Final leaf (V4) slightly damp frayed and with two small worm holes affecting lettering of final line of recto. Small neat scattered pencil marginalia throughout especially on the feps.
- The first printed English cookery book, the ‘Boke of Cokery’ produced by Pynson in 1500, was based on 15th-century texts. There was no immediate rush to print cookery books; what did appear were books of advice on diet and health, and on household and estate management, two areas which are often associated with receipts in medieval manuscripts. The best known of the first type are Sir Thomas Elyot’s 'Castel of Health'. 1539, and Andrew Boorde’s ‘Dyetary of Health’ circa 1542. The two books are remarkably similar, giving advice on healthy lifestyle based on Galen, although both authors offer comments on what is suitable for Englishmen, thus adapting Galenic theory to their readers. Thomas Coghan, a later rival to these authors, based his 'Haven of Health' (1584) on Elyot, but changed the order of his book to follow Hippocrates rather than Galen, and supplied a much more extensive commentary on a wider variety of herbs than the earlier writer. In these texts one can begin to discern signs of change at the dinner-table, with Elyot’s remarks on the wholesomeness of beef for the healthy Englishman, and with Coghan’s comments on salads, eaten at the beginning of the meal, and on apple tarts, eaten at the end. The second type of publication is best represented by Thomas Tusser’s doggerel writings, ‘A Hundreth Good Pointes of Husbandrie’ 1557, expanded to 'Five Hundreth Points' in 1573. The expanded version gives advice to housewives, stressing their role as providers of care and medicines for the sick, as well as managers of the daily routine of the household. Thomas Coghan advised students to breakfast on light, digestible foods, to avoid overloading the stomach with a variety of meats at one meal, to cut down on salt and to drink milk as a counteractant to melancholy. He recognized that excessive study made students prone to mental breakdown and recommended that they take regular breaks from study to avoid exhausting their mental energy, and that they refresh their minds with recreations such as music or games” (Norman 493). “It is a book of good sense… By the use of ‘one dish onely at one meale, and drinking thereto but small drinke’ he became slender” (Osler 2331). Coghan divided preventative health into five categories: labor or exercise of body and mind, eating, drinking, sleeping and sexual relations. Includes recipes for a variety of healthy drinks, including aqua vitae, rofa solis, cinnamon water, wormwood wine and buttered beer. Norman 493. STC 5481. Lowndes, 487. See Cagle 621-22, Osler 2331-33, Walleriana 2036.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11045

Collingwood. F   and Woolams. J.     - The very rare first edition.
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light Repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. The various Articles in CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. Together with Directions for Baking Bread, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. Besides a Variety of USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. The Whole Embellished with The Heads of the Authors, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year, and proper Subjets for the Improvement of the Art of Carving, elegantly engraved on fourteen Copper-Plates. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, AND JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand, Late from the London Tavern. LONDON: PRINTED BY R. NOBLE, FOR J. SCATCHERD AND J. WHITAKER, NO. 12, AVE-MARIA-LANE. 1792.
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. 2feps with 2 previous owners signatures. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 2p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month, with each verso blank. (curiously they have been bound in out of monthly order. All are present). (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue of seasonal articles. 445-451 Marketing Tables. 2feps. Original full dark calf covered boards with blind tooled lines on the boards. The spine with blind tooled lines. With a dark red label and gilt lettering. Overall has a nice patina. Besides very light age browning to frontispiece and plates , the text block is very clean. Overall, a nice copy.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams were the Principal cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern on the south side of the Strand, London WC1. Strype the historian informs us, that in 1729 an original tavern called the Crown occupied the same site. The Anchor was added to the name shortly after that date, in honour of St Clements Church nearby; an anchor being the emblem of the patron saint who suffered his martyrdom by being cast into the sea with an anchor tied to his neck. The site began a few doors down Arundel St. and extended to Milford Lane. It had an entrance from the Strand thro’ a narrow courtyard. The tavern was very famous and very well frequented by the rich, famous and important members of English high society. Dr Johnson made it his second home. Taking his daily walks with his friend Boswell past Temple Bar, going westward, the Crown and Anchor was their port of call and also of many of their confreres. It was here that Dr Jonson’s famous spat with Percy took place. The Academy of Music was first started at the Tavern. The house was pulled down in 1790 and rebuilt. A very large banqueting room was erected, measuring 85x36 feet, and when packed could hold 2500 guests. It was first opened on the occasion of a birthday dinner given to Charles James Fox, M.P. and presided over by the Duke of Norfolk. The room was used for fine balls and political meetings of both the Tories and radical Parties; anyone in fact who could pay the high prices. The Tavern became the headquarters of one party or another during the Westminster parliamentary elections. It is recorded that Daniel O’Conner M.P., Brougham Cobbet, Sir Francis Burdett and others, held meetings that always crowded the room. After the 1790 rebuild, the first landlord was a famous, very large obese man; Thomas Simkin. He famously died by leaning on the upstairs banister, and calling down some instructions, the banister gave way under his huge weight and he toppled to his death below. The Tavern had elegant booths opened for their customers at the courses during the racing season and the main fairs. As well as refreshments they also held dances. Sadly, in 1854 the Tavern burned down. Afterwards the Duke of Norfolk built Arundel House on the site and further afield. This great Tavern is the establishment where Collingwood and Woollams established their substantial reputation. They had the unique distinction of having this first edition of 1792; ‘The Universal Cook’, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. This book is a record of professional 18th century English gastronomy, as opposed to the cookery books written for the housewife. As can be read on the title page, it has extensive instructions for all the tasks undertaken in such an important Tavern and its Kitchen. The equally rare second edition was published in 1797 with very little change; see item ref #: 11131. See also, item ref #: 11035 for a rare dinner invitation to the Crown and Anchor Tavern when Collingwood and Woolllams were the head cooks.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11227

Collingwood. F   and Woolams. J.     - The very scarce 2nd edition.
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. The various Articles in CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. TOGETHER WITH Directions for Baking Breads, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. BESIDES A VARIETY OF USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. The Whole Embellished with The Heads of the Authors, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year, and proper Subjets for the Improvement of the Art of Carving, elegantly engraved on Copper-Plates. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, AND JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand ---- Late from the London Tavern. THE SECOND EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED BY R. NOBLE, FOR J. SCATCHERD, NO. 12, AVE-MARIA-LANE. 1797.
8vo. 1fep. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 4p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month, with each verso blank. (curiously there is a light water stain only on the plates. Not objectionable) (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue. 445-451 Marketing Tables. 1p Advertising. 1fep. Original full dark calf covered boards with blind tooled lines on the boards. The sympathetically re-laid spine has raised bands and gilt lines. With a brown label and gilt lettering. Overall has a nice patina. Besides the light stain on the plates, the text block is very clean.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams had the unique distinction of having their first edition of ‘The Universal Cook’ of 1792, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. The first smart restaurant to open in Paris the same year as ‘The Universal Cook’ was published, was called La Grande Taverne de Londres, after the London Tavern, where John Farley its famous Chef was serving his tenure. Collingwood and Woollams had also had a spell at the London Tavern, so one assumes they were as well known as Farley. This is a nice copy of the second edition printed seven years after the first. The illustration of the two authors as the book frontispiece are quite delicately etched and not as heavy handed as in later editions. With the bookplate of the famous cookery book collector - Lord Westbury, tipped onto the front paste-down.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11131

Collingwood. F.   and Woolams. J.     - Purchased in India during the British Raj
THE UNIVERSAL COOK,
AND City and Country Housekeeper. CONTAINING ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF COOKERY: THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF DRESSING Butchers Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; AND OF PREPARING GRAVIES, CULLICES, SOUPS, AND BROTHS; TO DRESS ROOTS AND VEGETABLES, AND TO PREPARE Little elegant Dishes for Supper or light repasts: TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF PIES. PUDDINGS, PANCAKES, AND FRITTERS; CAKES, PUFFS, AND BISCUITS; CHEESECAKES, TARTS, AND CUSTARDS; CREAMS AND JAMS; BLANC MANGE, FLUMMERY, ELEGANT ORNAMENTS, JELLIES, AND SYLLABUBS. THE VARIOUS ARTICLES IN CANDYING, DRYING, PRESERVING, AND PICKLING. THE PREPARATION OF HAMS, TONGUES, BACON, &C. DIRECTIONS FOR TRUSSING POULTRY, CARVING, AND MARKETING. THE MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. TOGETHER WITH Directions for Baking Breads, the Management of Poultry and the Dairy, and the Kitchens and Fruit Garden; with a Catalogue of the Various articles in Season in the different Months of the Year. BESIDES A VARIETY OF USEFUL AND INTERESTING TABLES. THE WHOLE EMBELLISHED WITH THE HEADS OF THE AUTHORS, BILLS FOR EVERY MONTH OF THE YEAR, AND PROPER SUBJECTS FOR THE IMPROVEMENTS OF THE ART OF CARVING, ELEGANTLY ENGRAVED ON FOURTEEN COPPER-PLATES. By FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, and JOHN WOOLLAMS. Principal Cooks at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand ---- Late from the London Tavern. THIRD EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED BY C. WHITTINGHAM, Dean Street, Fetter Lane, FOR J. STACHARD, No. 12, AVE-MARIE-LANE; H.D. SYMONDS AND HURST, PATERNOSTER-ROW; RICHARDSONS, ROYAL EXCHANGE; MARSH AND DUNSFORD, FLEET-STREET; GARNER, WESLEY, AND STARND, STRAND; LAKING, CURZON-STREET; DANGERFIELD, BERKLEY-SQUARE; MILLAR, AND JORDAN HOOKHAM BOND-STREET; KIRBY, OXFORD-STREET; LINDSELL, WIMPOLE-STREET; LLOTD, CAVENDISH-STREET;--1801.
8vo. 2feps. Half title. [2] Frontispiece of both authors. Title page. [1] 4p. Preface. 20p Contents. 12 engraved plates of bills of fare for every month. (1)2-432. 433-444 A Catalogue. 445-451 Marketing Tables. [1] Advertising. 2feps. Half dark brown modern calf with marbled boards and calf corners. The pages very lightly age browned with some manuscript notes. There an interesting manuscript note on the first page of recipes; "Bought this book from Col. David Smothen [?] and gave him 8 rupees for Mrs Smothen".(Probably a frugal mem-sahib selling the book before leaving for England). The whole text block has been trimmed slightly without loss of text. The third appears to be a very scarce edition, as none are cited in the bibliographies. A nice copy.
- F. Collingwood and J. Woollams had the unique distinction of having their first edition of ‘The Universal Cook’ of 1792, being translated into French and sold in France. Published in Paris in 1810 it was re-named ‘ Le Cuisinier Anglais Universal ou le Nec Plus Ultra de la Gourmandise’. This was the time of the war with Napoleon, but the reputation of London food and its Cooks stood high with foreigners. The first smart restaurant to open in Paris the same year as ‘The Universal Cook’ was published, was called La Grande Taverne de Londres, after the London Tavern, where John Farley its famous Chef was serving his tenure. Collingwood and Woollams had also had a spell at the London Tavern, so one assumes they were as well known as Farley. In spite of the fame and glory of Collingwood and Woollams’ book being translated into French, the French publisher had qualms. In his introduction, he wrote: “The English must eat well, look at their 'embonpoint!' If occasional recipes seem odd, they will at least, 'cher lecteur,' broaden your experience, acquainting you with ‘le catchup’ and ‘le browning’ which are unknown even to our best chefs.” In this age, with our British chefs feeling a need to bow in humble acknowledgement of the superior French culinary tradition and possible superior expertise (although this has definitely been changing in recent years) one is surprised by the above words of the French publisher. Collingwood and Woollams in turn, inform us grandly in their Preface: ‘We shall not attempt to ransack the annals of Antiquity, with a view to discover what was the food of our first parents in the garden of Eden, or in the manner they performed their culinary operation: It is sufficient for us to know a[t] present, that Cookery is become a Science, that every age has contributed its mite to the improvement of this art, which seems now to have reached a very high degree of perfection.’ Interesting! – I’m sure, Joel Robuchon, Gorden Ramsey, Paul Bocuse, Ferran Adria, Heston Blumenthal, Rick Stien, Alain Ducasse et al, are saying the same thing now, and that the great cooks of two or three generations hence, will express the same sentiments; How things change, but ultimately stay the same!.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10972

Copley.   Esther     - A very rare book.
Cottage Cookery
THE COMPLETE COTTAGE COOKERY, BY ESTHER COPLEY, AUTHOR OF "COTTAGE COMFORTS," "CATECHISM OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY," ETC, ETC. WITH PREFATORY CHAPTER BY HER DAUGHTER, AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE AUTHOR, Eleventh Edition. LONDON: GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCLIX.
1859. 12mo. Marbled paste-downs and end-papers, both ends. 1fep. [1] Frontis piece, engraved portrait of Esther Copley. Title page. [1] v-x Biographical Sketch. xi-xx Prefatory Chapter. 2p Contents. 3-127. [1] 4pp Advertisements. 1fep. Modern quarter black calf with black cloth boards and black calf corners. Lightly age browned throughout. A small water stain to the top corner of the last 8 pages. Overall a very nice copy.
- Although the first edition was printed in 1849 in book form (it originally appeared in the Family Economist) an advertisement for a tenth edition (cost 1 penny) appeared in the first of Beeton's 'Household Management' 24 monthly booklets on November 1st, 1859 (Mrs Beeton's famous book was printed in 24 monthly parts before being published in total as the first edition of 1861). A seventh edition also was advertised in an 1854 book; then this, the eleventh edition of 1859 would make one think there must be many copies, but the opposite is true; 'Cottage Cookery' is unmentioned in Bitting, Oxford, Axford, Driver, Attar, Cagle and the STC of Pollard & Redgrave. COPAC lists five copies: The BL, one copy - circa 1855. London University, one copy undated. Leeds University, three copies - 1858, 1859 & 1862. Only five recorded copies; one must attribute rarity. This can be accounted for when we see that Beeton's monthly booklets with their thin and delicate paper covers, easily damaged, lost or torn was sold for only three pence, then Copley's small booklet, sold for one pence must have been even less protected. Luckily this copy has lasted well.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11016

Copley.   Esther    
Cottage Comforts
WITH HINTS FOR PROMOTING THEM, GLEANED FROM EXPERIENCE: ENLIVENED WITH AUTHENTIC ANECDOTES. BY ESTHER COPLEY. NINTH EDITION. DEDICATED (BY PERMISSION) TO Her Most Gracious Majesty QUEEN ADELAIDE. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, STATIONER'S COURT. 1832.
12mo. 2feps. Title Page. [1] 2pp Dedication. 2pp Advertisement. 2pp Contents. 1-224. 8pp Index. [1] 2feps. Bound in half black calf with black cloth boards and calf corners. Spine with gilt lines, raised bands and gilt lettering. Good copy with very slight foxing to title page, first nine pages and the pages of the index.
- Esther Hewlitt Copley (nee Buizeville) was born in London on May 10th, 1786. Her father was a silk manufacturer at Spitalfields and the family lived in Hackney. Nothing is known of Esther's early life experiences until her marriage to James Philip Hewlett in 1809. The couple had five children, three sons and two daughters. They set up house in Oxford in St. Aldate's Street. James Philip Hewlett died prematurely of a lingering illness. On August 16, 1827 Esther married Rev. William Copley who was the minister of the Oxford Baptist Church. Esther was a prolific writer publishing more than forty books in her lifetime. These include tracts, works of domestic economy, stories for children, text books, sacred history and biography. It is of interest to note that Cottage Comforts, first published in 1825, reached its twenty-fourth edition in 1864. It is a household management manual addressed to the labouring classes embracing the spirit of both Mrs. Beeton and Dr. Spock. It includes chapters on childbirth, treatment of illnesses, hygiene, animal husbandry, the care and education of children, renting and furnishing a cottage, brewing and cookery. She is forthright with her opinions and practical advice. In her latter days Esther lived in Eythorne with her daughter Emma and Emma's husband, George Sargent. Her death on July 17th, 1851, was caused by tuberculosis, and it seems that her illness was exacerbated by a chill contracted when she was providing help for a needy family. Esther is buried in the Eythorne Baptist churchyard in Kent.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10930

Cox.   James     - An unusually long 19" plate
The Practical Confectioner,
EMBRACING THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF Pastry, and Confectionery, IN ALL THEIR VARIOUS BRANCHES; Containing upwards of 200 Genuine and Valuable RECEIPTS; CONSISTING OF upwards of 60 Second-Course and Supper Dishes; INCLUDING Jellies, Creams, Soufflés Puddings, Chantillas, and Ornamental Pastry and Confectionary of every description: Preserving in all its Various branches; Cakes and Biscuits of various kinds; Ice Creams and Water Ices; Sugars, Candies, Syrups &cc.; Many of which have never appeared in Print: the whole written in the plainest manner, without the least ambiguity; WITH THE BILLS OF FARE FOR BALL SUPPERS, ON A LARGE AND SMALL SCALE. BY JAMES COX. London: Published by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Browne; and sold by all the booksellers in the United Kingdom. 1822. PRICE EIGHT SHILLINGS.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION: 12 mo. 2feps. Title page with printers - Newcombe of Broad-Street, Bristol on verso. [1] (1)iv-vi Preface. 4 Plates of Bills of Fare, 3 folding with the largest measuring an unusual 19 inches long. (1)8-220. (1)222-234 Index. 2feps. Full calf with slightly faded boards and relaid calf spine with blind tooling, gilt lines and lettering. Cookery books are famed for the attrition they suffer in the greasy hands of those that use them. Although this one lacks the aforementioned grease, internally it is slightly yellowed with age, but overall its a fine copy of an extremely scarce book.
- One of the landmark books in the field of confectionery, pastry and sweets. A sole edition, the date on the preface states Clifton (Bristol) August 1922, and also advertised for 8 shillings in The London Literary Gazette on Saturday, September 14th 1922. One sees the antiquated style of the title echoed in other books throughout the 19th century. Never the less, Cox’s major work, although probably one of the the lesser known, is on a par with the other great Confectioners; Nutt, Jarrin, Borella, Dubois et al. Copies in any condition are extremely scarce. A key work in any collection of antiquarian cookery books. COPAC reveals five copies: St Andrews , Aberdeen, Cambridge, the Wellcome library and the BL also has one copy.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11153

Dalgairns   Mrs     - The 2nd Edition.
The Practice of Cookery.
ADAPTED BY THE BUSINESS OF EVERY DAY LIFE. BY MRS DALGAIRNS. SECOND EDITION. EDINBURGH: PRINTED FOR CADELL AND COMPANY EDINBURGH: SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, LONDON: AND ALL BOOKSELLERS. [A small single line] 1829.
174 x 105 mm. fep. Title page. [1]. Preface (1)vi-viii. Preface to the second edition. [1]. Index (1)xii-xxix. [1] Half Title page. [1]. (1)2-524. Appendix (1)526-528. 1fep. 1455 recipes in total. Full dark tan contemporary binding. Original re-backed spine with black label and gilt lettering. Some ink writing on the title page and with a small hole not affecting the text. Overall a nice copy.
- Online there is a surprising amount of detailed information about Mrs Dalgairns and her book: "The Practice of Cookery Adapted to the Business of Every-day Life.". Most of the information can be found at three places: #1 - http://www.cooksinfo.com --- #2 - http://www.electricscotland.com -- #3 – The Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada, Vol 45, No 1 (2007) A Fortuitous Nineteenth-Century Success Story by Mary F. Williamson of York University, Toronto, Canada. Most of the relevant information online is reproduced here. Mrs Dalgairns had the ‘The Practice of Cookery’ published in 1829, and republished up until 1860. This copy is a 2nd edition, published in Edinburg in 1829, the same year as the 1st edition, also published there. Cagle has a 2nd, and proclaims it is not shown in any other bibliographies consulted. Interestingly Cagle's 2nd edition asks for 532 pages. This copy has 528 and appears to be complete. One can only assume the missing 4 pages are advertisements. Catherine Emily Callbeck Dalgairns was an upper-middle class amateur foodie. The goal of the book was to enable any cook or housekeeper of limited experience to know how to prepare well most dishes in fashion at the time. She hoped that, at the same time, it might "be no less useful to the mistress of a family, if required for occasional reference." She stated at the outset that she was not providing any new recipes, but trying to select the best amongst those "already established in public favour." She either tested them herself, or relied on the opinion of "persons whose accuracy in the various manipulations could be safely relied upon." She used an unusual and helpful method in her book. Instead of doing all her introductory remarks lumped together at the beginning of the book, she put relevant remarks at the start of each chapter. She provided both a chapter list at the front, and an index at the back. Catherine was born into a privileged family in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (PEI), approximately in the late 1780s. She had three sisters, and two brothers. She was very much a child of the British Empire. Though born on Prince Edward Island, she had relatives in Ireland, England and in the American colonies. Her parents were Phillips (sic) Callbeck (1743 to 28 February 1790) and Anne Coffin (1752 to 15 October 1826.) Her father was Attorney-General and Surrogate-General of Probate of the Island of St John (aka Prince Edward Island), then president of His Majesty's Council for the same colony. He owned 20,000 acres of land there. During the American Revolution, he was taken prisoner during a sally by two American privateers into Charlottetown Harbour, taken south to the American colonies, and handed over to Colonel George Washington. Washington set him free with a letter of apology. On 11 September 1808, Catherine married Peter Dalgairns (born in Scotland on 29 October 1793. The couple left PEI sometime shortly afterward, living first in London, then moving to Dundee, Scotland around 1822. In 1829, she published her cookbook. The couple never returned to Prince Edward Island. They both died in Dundee, Scotland: Catherine on 1 March 1844 and Peter in 1853. Occasionally, you may see her referred to as perhaps the first "Canadian" cookbook author. Her Canadian association is tenuous, though, and mostly an accident of birth. It may be more accurate to term her, as does Mary F. Williamson, a 'British North American'. As far as the cook book is concerned, being printed in Edinburgh by an author residing in Dundee, the recipes are not exclusively Scottish. The recipes are highly varied, with many French culinary terms. There are recipes for Currie, Indian Pancakes, Caveach of Fish, Meat Kebabs, a rather basic Sauce Robert, a Boudin a la’ Richlieu. An interesting and fairly original Cookery book. Oxford p163 for a 1st edition. Bitting a 6th of 1836.

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ref number: 11245

Dalrymple.   George     - A sole edition. Very scarce
The Practice of Modern Cookery;
ADAPTED TO FAMILIES OF DISTINCTION, As well as to those of The MIDDLING RANKS of LIFE. To which is added, A GLOSSARY explaining the Terms of Art. By GEORGE DALRYMPLE, Late Cook to Sir John Whitefoord, Bart. EDINBURGH: Printed for the Author. Sold by C.ELLIOT, Edinburgh; and T.LONGMAN, London. MDCCLXXXI.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1781. 1fep. Title page. [1] 1p Dedication to Lady Whitefoord. [1] 1+vi Preface. 1+2-462. 1+464 Glossary of Terms. 1+466-475 Index. 1p Errata. 1fep. Title page evenly browned. Some minor foxing and staining to first six leaves. Some very light age browning throughout. Original dark brown sheep boards. Modern sympathetically rebound dark brown spine with raised bands and blind tooling. A dark brown label with gilt lettering and lines.
- George Dalrymple provides us with around one thousand recipes, giving them both English and French names. He is also one of the first cookery writers to give a glossary of terms. These points are remarkable according to Maclean. In his preface Dalrymple explains "there are a number of excellent receipts I have had occasionally from others..." – Maclean may be rather less enthused had she realised that Dalrymple plagiarized many of the recipes from the Frenchman Bernard Clermont’s cookery book, ‘The Professed Cook.’ – first edition, 1755. (which in turn is a translation of Menon’s French work ‘Les Soupers de la Cour). George Dalrymple had been cook to Sir John Whitfoord and the book is dedicated to his wife. Sir John Whitfoord, third baronet, lived in Whitefoord House in the Canongate of Edinburgh. Whitfoord is supposed to have been the original of Sir Arthur Wardour in Scott's 'Antiquary' and was one of the early partrons of Burns who celebrated him in verse and who made his daughter Maria [Cranstoun] the heroine of the 'Braes of Ballochmyle'. He was a very well-known figure in the Scottish capital and was depicted in Kay along with his cronies, Major Andrew Fraser and the Hon. Andrew Erskine (Edinburgh Portraits, 1877, no. cxcii). Thus it can be assumed that Dalrymple had cooked for the great and the good of mid-seventeenth century Edinburgh. This is a sole edition and uncommon in most cookery book collections. An interesting read also. Vicaire 244; Oxford p.113; Bitting p.114; Cagle 640; Maclean p.37; Lehmann p.141.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11036

David   Elizabeth     - Signed limited edition.
Italian Food
THIS SPECIAL EDITION OF ITALIAN FOOD HAS BEEN LIMITED TO 400 COPIES AND SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR, ELIZABETH DAVID, OF WHICH THIS COPY IS NUMBER 97/400. ELIZABETH DAVID (And also her full signature, undelined) WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF CPC (UNITED KINGDOM) LTD., FOOD INGREDIENTS DIVISION CHRISTMAS 1988. BARRIE & JENKINS LONDON.
SPECIAL EDITION. Large 4to. Light grey paste-down and endpapers. Half-title. [1] Title page. [1] Second title page. [1] 1pp Contents. On the verso, a re-print of Kitchen scenes from Bartolomeo Scappi's Opera. 7-16 Introduction. p16 Acknowledgments. On verso; A painting of a Kitchen. 19-224. 225-239 [1] Index. Light grey paste-down and endpapers. Light grey cloth binding with silver writing on the spine. D/J as new. Internally very clean. As new.
- A very handsome book. With many coloured illustrations and wonderful reprints of paintings of numerous kitchen scenes. This glossy production definitely has the E.D. stamp. It has many interesting recipes and fulsome information on all things gastronomically Italian and Italian products. A signed copy of a limited edition of 400 only, published four years before her death. Probably the least known E.D. publishing collaboration.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11179