Lemery.   M. Louis     The very rare first English edition.
A TREATISE OF FOODS In GENERAL:
First, The Difference and Choice which ought to be made of each Sort in parti-cular. Secondly, The Good and Ill Effects produced by them. Thirdly, The Principles wherewith they abound. And, Fourthly, The Time, Age and Constitution they [f]suit with. To which are added, Remarks upon each Chapter; wherein their Nature and U[f]ses are explained, according to the Principles of Chymi[f]siry and Mechani[f]sm. Written in French, By M. LOUIS LEMERY, Regent-Doctor of the Faculty of Phy[f]sick at Paris, and of the Academy Royal of Sciences. Now done into English. LONDON, Printed for John Taylor, at the Ship in St. Pauls-Church-Yard. MDCCIV.
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1 fep with provenance - Tomasina Bunyan, dated March 1830. [1] The Appropriation page is mis-bound, it should be bound in after the Title page. [1]. 3p To Monsieur Boudin. [1] 6p The Preface. 6p A Table of Chapters. (1)11-XX Of Foods in General. 1-310. 6 p Index. 2p Advertisements. 1 fep. The text block has been rebound tightly. The pages are evenly age browned with notations & some marginalia in an 18th century hand. Overall a fine copy. Contemporary dark brown panelled calf boards with a re-laid matching modern calf spine with raised bands with a black morocco label with gilt writing and tooling.
- M. Louis Lémery, - 1677–1743, wrote and published the first French edition of ‘Traité des alimens ‘ in 1702. In 1704 this very rare first English edition was translated and printed. Lemery was appointed physician at the Hôtel-Dieu de Paris in 1710, and became demonstrator of chemistry at the Jardin du Roi in 1731. He was also the author of ‘Dissertation sur la nature des os ‘ - 1704, as well as of a number of papers on chemical topics. His father Nicolas Lémery, (November 17, 1645 – June 19, 1715) a chemist, was born at Rouen. He was one of the first to develop theories on acid-base chemistry. Lemery's extremely scarce antiquarian book is also found in facsimile in the Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. They have made it available as part of their commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of facsimiles of rare and hard-to-find books. Bitting p.281; Cagle 821; Maclean p.89; Oxford 1704.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11191

Lemery.   M. Louis     The very scarce 2nd edition.
A TREATISE OF FOODS In GENERAL:
1. The Difference and Choice which ought to be made of each Sort in particular. 11. The Good and Ill Effects produced by them. 111. The Principles wherewith they abound. And, 1V. The Time, Age and Constitution they [f]suit with. To which are added, Remarks upon each Chapter; wherein their Nature and U[f]ses are explained, according to the Principles of Chymi[f]siry and Mechani[f]sm. Written in French, By M. LOUIS LEMERY, Regent-Doctor of the Faculty of Phy[f]sick at Paris, and of the Academy Royal of Sciences. Now done into English. LONDON, Printed for Andrew Bell, at the Cross Keys and Bible in Cornhill. 1705.
8vo. 1 fep. [1] Sponsors page dated 1703. Title Page. The Appropriation page. 3p To Monsieur Boudin. [1] 6p The Preface. 6p A Table of Chapters. (1)11-XX Of Foods in General. 1-320. 6 p Index. 2p Advertisements. 1 fep. The pages are evenly and very lightly age browned. Overall a very nice copy. Very nice contemporary dark brown two tone paneled calf boards and calf spine with raised bands.
- M. Louis Lémery, - 1677–1743, wrote and published the first French edition of ‘Traité des alimens‘ in 1702. In 1704 the very rare first translated English edition was published. This second English translation of 1705 is equally as rare. The French editions appear on the market more often, but are still quite scarce. Oxford as usual is perceptive. He states - "It is a very interesting book and full of ancient lore and superstition" as well as having good 18th century information on all sorts of contemporary food items. Rather than the usual rote following of a recipe, this book can be picked up and read more conventionally. Due to its rarity it does not appear in most of the great collections sold in past auctions.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11192

Liebig Company's.       - A beautiful copy of a scarce booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. Spine is relaid crimson cloth. Inside very clean with slight foxing on the title page. The guttering has been strenghtened with a light foxing not affecting the text. Overall a very good complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is rarely found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later, Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron, known as a very active organic chemist was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no debris of skin, bones nor meat) The promising lucrative plan appealed to the Baron so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of around 3000.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11063

Liebig Company's.       - A nice copy of a beautifully designed booklet.
Practical Cookery Book.
A collection of new and useful recipes in every branch of cookery. Compiled by Mrs H.M. Young. LONDON Leibig's Extract of Meat Company, Limited. 9 FENCHURCH AVENUE, E.C. 1893 (All rights reserved). PRINTED IN GERMANY.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 113MM. 2p Highly decorated inside front cover and Title page. Verso has an intriguing etching of the Liebig Factory, Frey Bentos, Uruguay. 1-111 Index. iv Advertisement page. v-vii Introduction. viii Preface. 1p Recipes. [1] 1-104. Highly decorated inside back cover. Beautifully decorated and colourful boards sometime expertly relaid. The guttering has a little rust form the staples not affecting the look or text. Overall a very nice complete copy of a very scarce company booklet that is not usually found in such good condition.
- The Liebig Extract of Meat Company (Lemco) was the originator of Liebig and Oxo meat extracts and later Oxo beef stock cubes. Baron Justin von Liebig invented a way to preserve the flavour of meat in the form of an extract. In the 1860's the Baron was known as a very active organic chemist and was invited to be a shareholder in a Uruguayan firm to produce a meat extract and transport the liquid in tons to Europe. (with no weight of skin, bones nor meat) The idea appealed to the Baron and promised to be very lucrative, so the company was established in December 4th 1865 in London. The factory was based at Fray Bentos at Villa Independencia, on the river Uruguay, (see image #2 below) where fresh air and an unlimited supply of water were an indispensable necessity for the slaughter of 1,500 four year old oxen daily during the seven months of the slaughter season. The company employed about 1000 hands, and with wives and children supported a community of 3000. The meat extract was a molasses-like black spread packaged in an opaque white glass bottle, and contained only reduced meat stock and salt (4%). It took 3 kg of meat to make 100 g of extract. By 1875, 500 tonnes of the extract were being produced at the Fray Bentos plant each year. The manufacture of the meat extract was done under the strict control of a company chemist. It was then shipped to Antwerp. On arrival in Europe it was again inspected and samples of each consignment were tested for composition and flavour. In the booklet the public are cautioned against various imitations. In 1873, Liebig's began producing tinned corned beef, sold under the label Fray Bentos. Later, freezer units were installed, enabling the company to also export frozen and chilled raw meat. A cheaper version of Liebig extract was introduced under the name Oxo in 1899. Later, the Oxo bouillon cube was introduced. In the 1920s, the company acquired the Oxo Tower Wharf on the south bank of the river Thames in London. There they erected a factory, demolishing most of the original building, preserving and building upon the riverside frontage. The Liebig Extract of Meat Company was acquired by the Vestey Group in 1924 and the factory was renamed El Anglo. Liebig merged with Brooke Bond in 1968, which was in turn acquired by Unilever in 1984. Liebig produced many illustrated advertising products: table cards, menu-cards, children games, free trade card sets, calendars, posters, poster-stamps, paper and other ephemera. These were often in the form of trading card sets with stories, historical tidbits, geographic tidbits, and so on. The sets usually consisted of six cards, one card included per product sale. Many famous artists were contracted to design those series of cards, which were first produced using true lithography, then litho chromo, chromolithography and finally offset printing. The cards remain popular with collectors and are often collected in albums. Copies of Liebig's recipe booklet are also much sought after. Due to the fact that they did not survive well in the oily and robust kitchen environment, lovely clean copies such as this one are quite rare.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11147

MacDonald   Duncan     - The 1st edition - 2nd issue.
The New London Family Cook:
OR, TOWN AND COUNTRY HOUSEKEEPER’s GUIDE. COMPREHENDING DIRECTIONS FOR MARKETING. With illustrative Plates, on a principle entirely new; General Observations, and Bills of Fare for every Week in the Year; Practical Instructions for preparing SOUPS, BROTHS, GRAVIES, SAUCES, AND MADE DISHES; AND FOR DRESSING FISH, VENISON, HARES, BUTCHERS’ MEAT, POULTRY, GAME, &C. IN ALL THEIR VARIETIES. With the respective Branches of PASTRY AND CONFECTIONARY, THE ART OF POTTING, PICKLING, PRESERVING, &C. COOKERY FOR THE SICK, AND FOR THE POOR; Directions for Carving; And a Glossary of the most generally received French and English Terms in the Culinary Art. ALSO A COLLECTION OF VALUABLE FAMILY RECIPES, IN DYEING, PERFUMERY, &C. INSTRUCTIONS FOR BREWING, MAKING OF BRITISH WINES, DISTILLING, MANAGING THE DAIRY, AND GARDENING. AND AN APPENDIX, Containing General Directions for Servants relative to the Cleaning of Household Furniture, Floor-Cloths, Stoves, Marble Chimney-pieces, &c. Forming in the whole a most complete FAMILY INSTRUCTOR. [a small line] BY DUNCAN MACDONALD, LATE HEAD COOK AT THE BEDFORD TAVERN AND HOTEL, COVENT GARDEN, AND ASSITANTS. [two very fine double lines] London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J.ROBINS AND CO. IVY LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW.
FIRST EDITION 2nd issue. Circa 1800. 12 mo. 1 fep. [1] Frontispiece of Macdonald’s portrait, ‘Published by J.Robins & Albion Press London’. Title page. [1] Preface 2 pages. (1)6 – 600. In-text 10 pages Plates of Carving and Butchery, Table settings and Bills of Fare, nine of the plates without an imprint, except one “Desserts” which is imprinted with ‘Engraved for Macdonald’s New London Cook’. 609-619 Tables of Marketing. 620-621 Conclusion. 622-630 Index. 2 pages Advertisements. 1fep. Frontispiece and the last for pages lightly damp browned. The text block is quite clean. With a modern binding of marbled boards with a quarter brown calf, raised bands, blind tooling with gilt text. Overall a good copy.
- The unusual information on the title page that informs us that the author is Duncan Macdonald the late Head Cook….. and also his assistants. What could this mean.? That Macdonald is dead and the book is written by, or collated by his assistants. Or does it mean Macdonald no longer works there and his ex-assistants took a part in the writing of the book after he had gone. Or did Macdonald write the book with the help of assistants. If this last is the case, and they were important enough to be included in the title page, then why not name them.? The mentioning of the “two servants” might be explained by the inclusion of the two page “Conclusion” on page 620 where it states that “The Proprietors of Macdonald’s New London Family Cook, cannot suffer the Volume to be closed, without remarking, that the promises, which they held forth in their promises for Publishing it, have been realised in their fullest extent”. It further states that “In addition to Mr Macdonald’s instructions for Cookery, in all its branches; for Marketing, and Carving: for Pastry, Confectionary, Potting, Pickling, and Preserving; they pledged themselves to furnish”….. etc etc etc. So, there we have it! All the other title page branches being added by the Proprietors. Using MacDonald’s name and his key chapters of Cookery etc, the Proprietors have put together a very comprehensive and interesting book. The effort has been thorough and sincere as can be seen by the inclusion of the well designed the frontispiece portrait of Macdonald. Quite how much of the material is original and how much is plagiarized would take some research. On page 197, there is a recipe for ‘The West-Indian Method of Dressing a Turtle’. When checked against an original handwritten publisher’s manuscript with the recipe "To dress a Turtle in the West India Way" inside a copy of the 4th edition of 1751 of Hannah Glasse’s famous work; “The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy”, see item # 10968 on page 16 of this website, the Macdonald recipe is identical in composition with every sentence cleverly re-arranged using the same words. In a recent conversation with Uta Schumacher Voelker she confirmed that the 1st Edition – 1st issue has the sentence in the title “An Alphabetical List of the most respectable Manufacturers and Dealers in the various Articles connected with Domestic Economy”. This copy does not have it, pointing towards a 2nd issue. MacLean informs of a second edition printed by John Cundee with the Preface dated 1808. Cagle cites only one J.Robin’s edition in the Library of Congress, but we are not told if it’s a 1st or 2nd issue. Oxford has this edition and states that it seems to be very complete.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11246

MacGeoch.   Catriona.     A fascinating and dangerous tradition from the Outer Hebrides.
SULAISGIER.
Photographs by James MacGeoch. Catriona MacGeoch / with John Love & Finely MacLeod. A small shield device of Acair Books (the publisher)
FIRST EDITION. 2010. 215 x 250 mm. 2feps. 1p Photograph of Gannets. Half-Title. Title Page. Verso Contents. 1p Preface. Verso with Dedication. 4p James MacGeoch. 1p Graham MacGeoch. A letter reproduced. 1p Map of Sulaisgier. xvi - xviii James MacGeoch 1914-1970. xix - xxvi Eathar Shulaisgier in Gaelic. 1p Photoraph. (2) 4-130 b&w Photographs. [1] 132 - 136 Descriptions of Photographs. 2 feps. Back and front covers with b&w Photographs In fine condition with a CD of film enclosed. Text in English and Gaelic.
- This fine book by Catriona MacGeoch is a dedication to her father, James MacGeoch who took most of the b&w photographs and Catriona wanting to record the strong tradition of the hunters of Sulaisgier. Condensed from an article in The Scotsman newspaper online, about a filmed documentary that centres on a venture every August to a remote Atlantic outcrop called Sùlaisgeir. It is an annual ritual that was first recorded in the 16th century about the young Gannet (called Guga in Gaelic) hunters who are licensed by Scottish Natural Heritage to kill 2,000 three-month old young Gannets who have just shed their soft white baby feathers and acquired their dark adult plumage Film crews follow the ten men from the remote community of Ness (who are known collectively as Niseachs), on Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides as they venture for the cull approximately forty miles north of Lewis. After the team arrive ashore following a five-hour boat trip, they set up their camp, covering a bothy with tarpaulin and building a chute and pulley system so they can move equipment and dead birds up and down the soaring cliffs. A radio transmitter is put up to allow contact with home. The men live on the island for two exhausting weeks, sleeping rough in the bothy, which was first constructed by monks over a thousand years ago. Using traditional methods, they work ceaselessly and dangerously, killing and processing the 2,000 birds by catching them with a long pole with a clip, before it is quickly stunned by hitting it on the back of the head with a stick, then beheaded. The cliffs are very slippery and the men bind their shoes with rough canvas to allow some grip (see image #3 below). The dead Guga are then plucked, cut open and splayed, removing the innards, singing the skin, covering with rough salt inside and out, and finally stacked in a neat but tightly layered pile. They are then, at the end of the hunt, sent down the chute to be taken back to Ness with the hunters, whom one imagines that by this time, probably smell pretty ripe. The film gives rare access to the hunters who read from the Bible twice a day, sleep top to tail in the cramped bothy and hold a barbeque of Guga, dipped in madras powder and whisky on their last night. The film features Dods MacPhárlain, who holds the licence for the hunt, as he embarks on his 42nd and final trip to Sùlaisgeir. He said: “I’ve smelt the Guga since I was a year old so I was destined to go. It means so much to me. That’s probably why I have been going for over forty years. A tradition which spans centuries, the hunt is the last of its kind in the UK. The flesh of the young gannet is regarded as a delicacy in Ness today though, for others, it is an acquired taste. The Guga smell very strongly once processed during the hunt and stored. Many Ness women will not allow them into the house. It was a popular meat in earlier times in Scotland. In the sixteenth century it was served at the tables of Scots kings and was a favourite with the wealthy as a ’whet’ or appetizer before main meals. This is a fascinating insight into a community still carrying forward a very old tradition. What is also compelling, is to realize that this extremely dangerous hunt of the Guga would have started as a pragmatic necessity of survival. In other articles online, one reads that the extreme smell of the preserved seabird is almost addictive. It also mirrors the famous Hákarl, the national dish of Iceland consisting of a Greenland shark or other sleeper shark which have been cured with a particular fermentation process and hung to dry for four to five months. The smell being as objectionable to the unsuspecting nose as the Hebridean Guga. Other very obnoxious smelly fare are the dried fish of India and Vietnam that show the same need for preservation as the more easily acceptable Bacalhau of Portugal and Spain. In this time of storage freezers, fast national and international transportation and distribution of fresh fish and meats, it's amazing that a love for those foods has stayed so strong. Just as Dods MacPhárlain said above, that the smell of Guga since he was one year old compelled him to carry the tradition forward and to crave the taste of that preserved young bird.

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Modern category
ref number: 11267

MACKENZIE   COLIN    
Five Thousand Receipts.
IN ALL THE USEFUL AND DOMESTIC ARTS, CONSTITUTING A COMPLETE AND UNIVERSAL Practical Library, AND OPERATIVE CYCLOPAEDIA. - Mr Hobbes, of Malmesbury, thought the accumulation of details a hindrance of learning; and used to wish all the Books in the world were embarked in one ship, and he might be permitted to bore a hole in its bottom. He was right in one sense; for the Disquisitions and Treatises with which our Libraries are filled, are ofter merely the husks and shells of knowledge; but it would be to be wished, that before he were permitted to bore his hole, some literary analysts should select all the facts, Recipes, and Prescriptions, useful to Man, and condense them into a portable Volume. LOCKE. By COLIN MACKENZIE, AUTHOR OF ONE THOUSAND EXPERIMENTS IN MANUFACTURES AND CHEMISTRY. FIFTH EDITION. LONDON: PRINTED FOR G.B.WHITTAKER, AVE MARIA LANE, AND TO BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 1825. Price 10s 6d. Bound, or 12s, Calf-gilt.
Thick 140 x 147mm. 3 feps with ink stamp ‘Capt. G.D. INGLIS. R.M. A.D. 1908. Title page with Capt. Inglis’s stamp. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)6 – 798. (1)800 – 827 Index. [1] Advertisement. 3 fep with Capt. Inglis’s stamp. Original full brown calf with gilt writing on the front boards. A little rubbed. The spine is a modern quarter red cloth with gilt writing. Internally very clean. A very nice copy.
- This is a Victorian style all purpose household and hobbies book that has a gilt heading on the front cover stating "Family Library". The chapters start with Metallurgy and include Varnishes, Polishing, Artists Colours, Crayons, Miniature Paintings, Enamelling, Engraving, Dyeing, Bleaching, Brewing, Wines, Distilling, Cookery, Pastry, Perfumery, Medicine, Farriery, Tanning, Horticulture, Husbandry, Domestic Economy, Pottery, Glass etc etc. A comprehensive and true glimpse of the crafts of the time.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11117

MACKENZIE   COLIN     - Very scarce.
Five Thousand Receipts.
IN ALL THE USEFUL AND DOMESTIC ARTS, CONSTITUTING A COMPLETE AND UNIVERSAL Practical Library, AND OPERATIVE CYCLOPAEDIA. - Mr Hobbes, of Malmesbury, thought the accumulation of details a hindrance of learning; and used to wish all the Books in the world were embarked in one ship, and he might be permitted to bore a hole in its bottom. He was right in one sense; for the Disquisitions and Treatises with which our Libraries are filled, are ofter merely the husks and shells of knowledge; but it would be to be wished, that before he were permitted to bore his hole, some literary analysts should select all the facts, Recipes, and Prescriptions, useful to Man, and condense them into a portable Volume. LOCKE. By COLIN MACKENZIE, AUTHOR OF ONE THOUSAND EXPERIMENTS IN MANUFACTURES AND CHEMISTRY. A NEW EDITION. LONDON: SHERWOOD, GILBERT, AND PIPER, PATERNOSTER-ROW; AND TO BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS IN TOWN AND COUNTRY. 1834. Price 10s 6d. Bound.
Thick 143 x 150mm. 1 fep. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)6 – 798. (1)800 – 827 Index. 1p Advertisements. (1) [1] (1)4 – 22 [2] Catalogue of Modern Books. 1fep. Original full brown calf boards with gilt writing on the front. A little rubbed. Re-backed spine in modern mid-tan calf with raised bands, gilt lines and blind tooling. Black label with gilt writing. Internally quite clean. A nice copy of a very scarce book.
- Nothing is recorded nor known about MacKenzie. Oxford appears to have a first edition of 1823 and cites a third of 1824. He also states that there was reprints in America as late as 1870. Bitting has a fourth American edition of 1829 and cites a Philadelphia edition of 1866.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11118

Malouin.   Par M.     - Complete with a full set of plates.
Description et Details des Arts
DU MEUNIER, DU VERMICELIER ET DU BOULENGER; Avec une Histoire abrégée de la Boulengerie, & un Dictonnaire de ces Arts. Par M. MALOUIN. M.DCC.LXVII.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1767. Large folio. 430x295mm 1fep. Title page. [1] 2pp Table des Titres et Chapitres. (1)2-340. 10pp of Engraved plates; 2pp of the Meunier (Miller) ; 2pp of the Vermicelier (Pasta maker) ; 6pp of the Boulenger (Baker). 1fep. All pages very clean. Contemporary dark brown calf spine with blue marbled boards and calf tips. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and red gilt label. Externally very slightly rubbed but overall in excellent condition.
- The outstanding full page engraved plates chronicle the methods, equipment and final product of the Miller, Pasta maker and Baker. The book is full of precise instructions pertaining to the three trades, particularly the Baker. It details everything from the quality and storage of the wheat berries to the methods of stone grinding, to the oven construction and equipment used for processing and baking. In an article online called 'The Pristine Loaf' by Hildegard Pickles, there is a chapter detailing the changeover to Yeast. Sour-dough had remained for centuries the only leavening agent for bread making. This was also the case in France, where it represented the sole raising agent, except for cake making purposes for which brewer's yeast was used until pressed yeast replaced it. In the 17th century a fundamental change took place that is chronicled by Malouin in this book. When the changeover to yeast occurred, there was a protest, as the Medical Faculty in Paris did not approve. A resolution taken by them on 24 March 1668 resulted in no majority gained for the use of yeast alone, and only after a further resolution was made by the French parliament on 21 March 1670 were bakers allowed to use yeast. The resolution also demanded that it must be fresh and obtained from a Parisian brewery, and that it should also be mixed with sour-dough. (A typical political decsion trying to appease 3 trades at once and ending up with a mish-mash of a raising agent). The yeast in those days was obviously different and the process was changing and evolving over time. Bakers could no longer rely on the same product and had to evolve as well. One wonders how consistent the loaves were. It must have been a frustrating time for the them individually and as a trade. The beautiful and impressive plates are sometimes found at auction and fetch on their own, silly money. In the complete state with a full compliment of plates, a very rare, fascinating and handsome book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11087

Manuscript Receipts   - De Capell Brooke Family     - a distinguished provenance.
Great Oakley Hall, Northamptonshire.
One 19th Century vellum bound volume.
204x165mm. Marbled paste-downs and end-papers. Loose first page which is a two column index of 73 recipes. First sixty pages are written recipes in black and brown ink in predominately two neat hands in an early Victorian script. 24 pages of tipped-in assorted recipes. 68 blank pages. At the back 22 pages of medicinal recipes. Two recipes are dated, #73, Stewed Rabbit - 1855 Jan. 22nd Oakley. and the last written recipe for Semolina Ghnocchi inscribed Mrs Symond. June 1894, - Internally quite clean, Fully bound in age dusted vellum with a 1 inch brown stain on the front cover. The hinge and guttering are cracked but holding well. Altogether a very interesting document with fine provenance.
- This manuscript recipe book belonged to Catherine De Capell Brooke of Great Oakley Hall, Great Oakley, Northamptonshire. The Hall has been the De Capell Brooke's ancestral home for over five centuries. The Brookes' are perhaps the most ancient family in Northamptonshire still living in their ancestral home. In 1472 William Brooke purchased a manor in the small village of Great Oakley . It is situated approx. 2 miles from Corby and 5 miles from Kettering. Much of Great Oakley has been in ownership of the Brooke Family since then. The present lord of the manor is Hugh de Capell Brooke, who lives with his family in Great Oakley Hall, which was extensively renovated in the 1960s. Although in recent years extensive new housing estates have been built at the top end of the village, a preservation order exists on all trees and stone houses in the village ensuring that some of the character of Great Oakley remains for future generations. Thomas Brooke is believed to have began building Great Oakley Hall in 1555. After the death in 1762 of Wheeler Brooke the estates descended to Mary Supple whose husband took the name of Brooke. Their son, Richard De Capell Brooke, Bart: was made a Baronet in June 20th 1803. His first son, Sir Arthur, the 2nd Baronet was a famous traveller and author. (died 1858). The second son, Sir William De Capell Brooke, Bart: (born 1801) succeeded to his brother's title and estate in 1858. A Barrister at Law, he died in 1897. In 23.4.1829 Sir William married Catherine [nee Watson] De Capell Brooke (born 1802), daughter of Lewis Thomas Watson, the 2nd Lord Sones. It appears Catherine started this cookery manuscript after she got married, and it further appears it was passed on within the family after her death on 24.11.1888. With the last date of 1894 recorded, we may assume it was written and in use from, circa 1829 - 1894. Considering these kind of items are handled fairly often, and used in a relatively hazardous and oily environment it has survived well. It is altogether a handsome and well maintained household book with interesting recipes and advice. Many come up for sale but without clear provenance. The dealer from whom I purchased this item also owned other documents and ephemera from Great Oakley. He also did most of the research on Catherine De Capell Brooke.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11158