KENT.   ELIZABETH GREY, COUNTESS OF     A very rare original un-sophisticated copy.
A Choice Manual, or rare secrets in physick and chirugery;
Collected, & practised by the Right Honourable the Countess of Kent, Late deceased. Whereto are added several Experiments of the virtue of Gascons powder, and Lapis contra Yarvam by a Professor of Physick. As also most exquisite ways of Preserving, Conserving, Candying, etc. The Sixteenth Edition. London, Printed for A.M. for Margaret Shears at the Blew-Bible in Bedford-Street in Covent-Garden. 1672. WITH A SECOND PART: A True Gentlewomans DELIGHT. Wherein is contained all manner of COOKERY. Together with: Preserving, Conserving, Drying, and Candying. Very necessary for all Ladies and Gentlewomen. Published by W.G. Gent. LONDON, Printed for for A.M. for Margaret Shears at the Blew-Bible in Bedford-Street in Covent-Garden. 1671.
110 x 54 x 25mm. Small 12mo. 1fep. [1] Portrait frontispiece. Title page. [1] 2pp Epistle by W.J. 2p 'To the Reader' 13p. 'Contents' [1] 1-233. THE 2ND PART: Separate pagination - 6pp 'Table of Contents' Title page. 2pp Epistle by W.J. 2pp 'To the Reader' 14pp 'Contents' 1-140. 2fep. Original un-sophisticated full brown leather with no paste-down to cover the exposed inside cover. Very worn with back board cracked. I/3 of the spine missing and the rest just holding. The text block broken into sections but still holding. Internally showing very mild overall aging but surprisingly fine. Because of its delicate but entirely original state, now housed in a fine dark brown leather clam-shell box.
- The daughter and co-heiress of the 7th Earl of Shrewsbury, Lady Elizabeth Talbot (1581-1651) married Henry Grey, Lord Ruthin (died 1639) in 1601; he succeeded his father as 8th Earl of Kent in September 1623. Elizabeth Grey, was a great heiress, an attendant to Queen Henrietta Maria, and the wife of Henry Grey, Earl of Kent. She was also renowned for her patronage of talented individuals. At their main home, Wrest Park, Bedfordshire, she played host to a circle that included the scholars John Selden and Robert Cotton, the poet Thomas Carew, and later the poet Samuel Butler and the miniaturist Samuel Cooper. The Countess of Kent is probably best known for this enormously popular collection of household recipes bearing her name. A Choice Manual. was first published in 1653, two years after her death. This collection was in fact compiled by the book’s editor, William Jarvis, a ‘professor of physick’, although Jarvis claimed that all the medical recipes in the book were ‘collected and practised’ by the Countess. It is split into two parts. The first is medicinal, while the second, ‘A True Gentlewoman’s Delight’, is dedicated to luxurious culinary fare. A typical recipe from the latter, attributed to Alathea, Countess of Arundel; Elizabeth Grey’s sister, is for a rich, dense bread known as Manchet. It was apparently a favourite at the court of Henry VIII, and remained popular for centuries after. The recipe for Lady Arundel’s Manchet is remarkably concise: "Take a bushel of fine wheat flower, twenty Eggs, three pound of fresh butter, then take as much Salt and Barme after the ordinary Manchet, temper it together with new milk pretty hot, then let it lie in the space of half an hour to rise, so you may work it up into bread, and bake it, let not your oven be too hot." Barme, was a brewer’s yeast carefully skimmed off the top of fermenting ale, after its second week in the vat. Its delicate flavour was preferred to the tanginess of a sourdough starter. [Attributed to an article by Sam Kinchin-Smith from the English Heritage website.] Image #1 below of Lady Grey was painted by Paul van Somer. A Netherlands painter, who worked in Amsterdam, Leiden, the Hague and Brussels before settling in London by December 1616.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11265

Kettilby.   Mary    
A Collection of above three hundred receipts in cookery, physick and surgery;
For the Use of all Good Wives, Tender Mothers, and Careful Nurses. By several hands. The FOURTH EDITION. To which is ADDED, A SECOND PART, Containing a great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. LONDON: Printed for Mary Kettilby, and Sold by RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII. SECOND TITLE: A COLLECTION OF RECEIPTS IN COOKERY, Physick and Surgery. PART 11. Containing Likewise, A great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. By several Hands. The THIRD EDITION. Printed for RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII.
8vo. 1fep. Title page. [1] (1)iv-viii Preface. (1)10-183. 7p Index. Second Title page. [1] (1)194-272. 4p Index. 2feps. Full original dark brown calf boards with a little wear but nice patina, with faded gilt line all around the edge. Spine re-laid in dark brown calf with raised bands and a bottle green label and gilt lettering. Internally slightly age-browned but otherwise a good copy. There are two manuscript inscriptions by Eliz. Thornby March 25th 1792.
- This fourth edition has a second part - third edition, but they are both dated 1728. Mary Kettilby's name appeared on the Title page for the first time in the second edition. The BL holds a 1734 edition that also states 'fourth edition' on the title page but which the BL calls the fifth. It also has a 7th edition of 1749 with a second part stating the 6th edition of 1746. The different dates to the second parts came about due to the fact the first edition of 1714 had no second part, they only started appearing on the second edition of 1719.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11080

Kettilby.   Mary    
A Collection of above three hundred receipts
IN Cookery, Physick and Surgery; For the USE of all Good Wives, Tender Mothers, and Careful Nurses. By several Hands. The FOURTH EDITION. To which is ADDED, A SECOND PART, Containing a great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. LONDON: Printed for Mary Kettilby, and Sold by RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII. -- SECOND TITLE: A COLLECTION OF RECEIPTS IN Cookery, Physick and Surgery. PART 11. Containing Likewise, A great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. By several Hands. The THIRD EDITION. LONDON: Printed for RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII.
8vo. Decorated silk paste-down and end paper. 2feps. Title page with a double lined border. [1] (1)iv-viii Preface. (1)10-183. 7p Index. Second Title page with a double lined border. [1] (1)194-272. 4p Index. 2feps. Decorated silk paste-down and end paper. Quarter dark brown calf with marbled boards and tips with blind tooled lines. Spine with raised bands, with gilt devices in compartments with gilt title. Inernally very clean, with a very slightly dusty title page, and last page of index. Overall in very good condition.
- From an interesting article online called the 'History of Wafers' we learn of a recipe in Mary Kettilby's, 'A Collection of Above Three Hundred Receipts' (London: 1724) called, "The Right Dutch-Wafer -- Take four Eggs, and beat them very well, then take a good Spoonful of a Pint of fine Sugar, one nutmeg grated, Cream, and a Pound of Flower, a Pound of butter melted, two or three Spoonfuls of Rose-water, and two good Spoonfuls of Yeast; mix all, well together, and bake them in your Wafer-tongs on the Fire. For the Sauce, take grated Cinnamon, Sack, and melted Butter, sweetened to your Taste." This sounds like an early Belgian Waffle where Kettilby calls for yeast instead of beaten egg whites to lighten the wafer/waffle. A fine example of how recipes develop over the years and in tandem with those of different geographical locations. Its amazing how the key elements of demand, equipment, foodstuffs, cooking knowledge and skills produced dishes that had many similarities throughout the main European cuisines.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11123

Kettilby.   Mary     - The first editon
A Collection of above three hundred receipts in cookery, physick and surgery;
For the Use of all Good Wives, Tender Mothers, and Careful Nurses. By several hands. LONDON, Printed for RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. MDCCXIV.
FIRST EDITION 1714. 8vo. Pp. Half title. Title page. 12. 1-218. [219-232] Full contemporary two-tone dark brown calf boards with nice polished patina. Sympathetically re-backed dark brown calf spine with raised bands and blind tooling. No labels. Pages evenly browned throughout, with some staining, but not affecting text. Overall a good copy of the very rare first.
- Mary Kettilby's first edition of 1714 has the first printed recipe for "modern" orange marmalade. Interestingly it was the Scots who moved marmalade to the breakfast table, complete with finely cut peels, or chips, to use the Scottish term. There it joined scones, sausages, game pies, trout, roast beef and sometimes a haunch of venison on the sideboard. The traditional Scottish breakfast was certainly not for the meek or those of delicate constitution or stomach. Not until well into the 19th century did the English follow the Scottish example and abandon the eating of marmalade in the evening (originally a post-dinner digestive rather than a jam). Mrs Kettilby's formula called for whole oranges, lemon juice and sugar. A contemporary recipe for home-made marmalade, that of Shaun Hill, owner of the Michelin two-star Merchant House in Shropshire, differs only slightly, using whole lemons along with the oranges and sugar. "Homemade marmalade", he says, "is superior to anything you can buy", and he made twenty cases of Seville oranges into marmalade each January when he cooked at Gidleigh Park in Chagford, Devon, a prominent country-house hotel. I should imagine there would not be a lot of difference in taste between Hill's recipe and that of Kettilby's due to the presumed consistent taste of oranges over the centuries.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10916

Kettilby.   Mary    
A Collection of above three hundred receipts
IN Cookery, Physick and Surgery; For the USE of all Good Wives, Tender Mothers, and Careful Nurses. By several Hands. The FOURTH EDITION. To which is ADDED, A SECOND PART, Containing a great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. LONDON: Printed for Mary Kettilby, and Sold by RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII. -- SECOND TITLE: A COLLECTION OF RECEIPTS IN Cookery, Physick and Surgery. PART 11. Containing Likewise, A great Number of Excellent Receipts, for Preserving and Conserving of Sweet-Meats, &c. By several Hands. The THIRD EDITION. LONDON: Printed for RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's-Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. M.DCC.XXVIII.
8vo. Marbled paste-down and end paper. 2feps. Title page with a double lined border. [1] (1)iv-viii Preface. (1)10-183. 7p Index. Second Title page with a double lined border. [1] (1)194-272. 4p Index. (1)2-8 Advertisements. 2feps. Marbled paste-down and end paper. Quarter green morocco with marbled boards. Sun faded spine with raised bands, with sharp gilt devices in compartments with gilt title. Inernally very clean with a very slightly dusty title page. Overall very good condition.
- This fourth edition has a second part - third edition, but they are both dated 1728.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11122

Kettilby.   Mary     - A first edition
A Collection of above three hundred receipts in cookery, physick and surgery;
For the Use of all Good Wives, Tender Mothers, and Careful Nurses. By several hands. LONDON, Printed for RICHARD WILKIN, at the King's Head in St. Paul's Church-yard. MDCCXIV.
FIRST EDITION 1714. 8vo. Pp. Half title. Title page. 12. 1-218. [219-232] Full contemporary two-tone dark brown calf boards, lightly cracked with nice polished patina. Sympathetically re-backed dark brown calf spine with raised bands. No labels. Pages evenly browned throughout, with a light mark on the title page where the date was written in biro and the binder has erased the ink. Does not affect the text or border. A small strip 2 inches long by 1/8 inch wide missing from the very last page of index with very slight loss of text. The strip has been neatly repaired. Overall a nice copy of the very rare first.
- In the first half of the 15th century, the English made a spiced jelly called 'Chardequynce' from quinces (or quinces and pears) and honey (or sugar). Then in 1495, only three years after Columbus's first epic voyage to America, a Portuguese ship's captain named Farnando Yanes delivered to the port of London the first consignment of 'Marmelada' to arrive in Britain. The English initially ate it as a sweetmeat or as an after-dinner digestive. It was solid, not semi-liquid, and it came in a box, not a pot. But gradually cooks began to experiment with other fruits, first using apples or at least their inherent pectin to aid the jelling process with other fruits. At this time a modern type marmalade as we know it came about. The first printed recipe for orange marmalade was published in this book, Kettilby's first edition of 1714.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10917

Kidder.   Edward     A later edition with the 8 plates.
E. KIDDER'S RECEIPTS OF PASTRY AND COOKERY.
For the Use of his Scholars. Who teaches at his School in Queen Street; near St. Thomas Apostles On. Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, In the Afternoon, ALSO On Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays, In the Afternoon, at his School next to Furnivals Inn in Holburn. Ladies may be taught at their own Houses.
8vo. 190 x 110 mm 1 fep. [1] Frontispiece portrait by Robert Sheppard of the author in wig. Title page well laid out and enclosed within a lined border (Essentially an advertisement for Kidder's schools). 52 leaves, entirely engraved throughout on recto pages with versos blank. 8 engraved plates (three folding) of patterns and ornamental designs for pies and pastries. Original 1 fep. Contemporary paneled calf, covers blind tooled, with a margin surrounding the central panel painted and speckled. Nicely re-backed. Occasional light foxing or staining to text. Overall fine condition.
- Pastry Chef Edward Kidder - circa 1665/6-1739, opened his first pie shop in the Cheapside area of London. Soon he was known throughout the city for his delicious pastries, from rich lamb pies to savoury chicken to sweet custard tarts. He eventually opened a second location, and by all accounts was a highly successful businessman when he began to demonstrate his pie making techniques for wealthy ladies by opening a popular pastry school in London. His obituary in the London Magazine claiming that he "taught near 6000 Ladies the Art of Pastry." His school had several different locations in the first half of the 1700's, with the various addresses resulting in title-page variants on the different versions of his published book of Pastry and Cookery. Kidder's first edition was printed 1720/21, but there is manuscript evidence that the schools started at least as early as the 1700's. An engraved, printed title-page at the Brotherton Library of Leeds University of MS 75, is inscribed ‘London 1702’, and is followed by 71 folios of manuscript recipes similar to, if not verbatim copies of, the recipes which appear in the published Kidder texts. [Ref: The Recipes Project online] The title on this copy lists Kidder's address as "Queen Street, near St. Thomas Apostles," his location from around 1723 onwards. Although Kidder ran a pastry school, his recipes covered the whole range of soups, salads, meat, fish, poultry, sauces, and jellies, as well as pies and tarts. His recipes were repeatedly plagiarized throughout the eighteenth century, yet Kidder seems not to have plagiarized recipes himself. He probably taught his students to make established favourites, so even if his Receipts may not be especially inventive, it is a valuable record of 170 standard English dishes of the day, accompanied by attractive designs for pie shapes and decorations. The first recipe for puff pastry identical to the standard commercial product of today to appear in print is Kidder's. (ODNB). Kidder gave his students blank notebooks bound with a printed pre-title page from his cookbook. The students then copied his later cookbook text into these notebooks as their lessons progressed. There are five quite similar in content, hand written Kidder manuscripts by different ladies in five separate institutional collections. Three can be found online at the Universities of Pennsylvania, Chicago and Indiana's Lilly Library. An extremely scarce, handsome and an all-together intriguing book. ESTC T92424; Cagle 793; Axford, p. 124; Bitting, p. 259; Craig, p. 51; MacLean, p. 82; Oxford, p. 71.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11290

Kidder.   Edward     - A beautiful miniature
E. KIDDER'S RECEIPTS of Pastry and Cookery.
For the Use of his Scholars. Who teaches at his School in St Martins le Grand; On. Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, In the Afternoon, ALSO On Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays, In the Afternoon, at his School next to Furnivals Inn in Holburn. Ladies may be taught at their own Houses.
A 1995 reprint in miniature of the 1st edition, 2nd issue of 1721 [see item 10966 below]. Text block - 2 1/4" x 3 3/4" Full brown speckled calf binding, with raised bands on spine with gilt lines and brown label with gilt lettering. Binding measuring 2 1/2" x 4" -- Pp. Engraved portrait frontispiece by Robert Shephard. Title page, 41 leaves with the engraved text on rectos only with versos blank. Last two leaves with 'The Order for Bills of Fare' and the Index. A beautiful and unique miniature edition.
- The portrait of Kidder is 'un-wigged', showing his natural hair. Later editions have Kidder with wig, and also have eight engraved plates. This edition does not have the plates but is complete. This is verified in the joint study published in PPC, Vols #'s 32 & 39 by Peter Targett in UK and Simon Varey in US. Kidder issued the recipes to his students one by one, in line with the daily and weekly lectures. The plates were issued later when he moved his schools to other locations. This is why the pagination of Kidder's books present so many variances. Hence Targett and Varey's welcome and helpful research. A beautiful and desirable item. One of a limited edition of 300.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10918

Kidder.   Edward     - A rare early edition
E. KIDDER'S RECEIPTS OF Pastry AND Cookery.
For the Use of his Scholars. Who teaches at his School in St Martins le Grand; On. Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, In the Afternoon, ALSO On Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays, In the Afternoon, at his School next to Furnivals Inn in Holburn. Ladies may be taught at their own Houses.
8vo. The 1st edition, 2nd issue of 1721. 1fep. Engraved portrait frontispiece by Robert Shephard. Title page, 41 leaves with the cursive script engraved on rectos only with versos blank. (A costly and rarely used process). Last two leaves with 'The Order for Bills of Fare' and the Index. 1fep. Full brown speckled sheep binding, with raised bands on spine with gilt lines and green label with gilt lettering. Internally nice and clean, with a small light oily fingerprint on the bottom corner of the title page (not affecting the text).
- In reality this is not a printed book but rather a book of engravings. The beautifully laid out sheets of engraved scripted recipes, (with every verso blank) the elegant title page, the sculpted looking frontispiece, go towards making this one of the most handsome books, not only in cookery but any category. The portrait of Kidder is 'un-wigged', showing his natural hair. Other later editions have Kidder with wig and 8 engraved plates that were also added, (see item 11290 above). Also in later editions, pagination and recipe numbers vary greatly. This is all explained by the fact that Kidder's book only came about after his students were issued with the recipe sheets as their daily lessons progressed during their cookery course. It appears from the later editions of the book, Kidder's lessons were developed and added to, though the actual recipes themselves stayed the same. Another point of interest in the title pages of later editions, is the changing location addresses of Kidder's schools, presumably as his student numbers grew. Because of these haphazard factors, the work is bibliographically complex. Thankfully, it is greatly helped by the very good research of Peter Targett in the UK & Simon Varey in the US, whose joint study is published in Petit Propos Culinaires, Vols # 32 & 39. The study verifies this edition is complete as well as compelling evidence of all the other various editions and their cookery school locations. Collectors want the later copies with the eight engraved plates (3 folding) of patterns and ornamental designs for pies and pastries. This is understandable, but the very early editions like this one, without the plates but never the less complete, are rarer still.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10966

King.   Dr William    
The Original Works.
ADVOCATE OF THE DOCTORS; JUDGE OF THE HIGH COURT OF ADMIRALTY AND KEEPR OF THE RECORDS IN IRELAND, AND VICARGENERAL TO THE LORD PRIMATE. NOW FIRST COLLECTED INTO THREE VOLUMES: WITH HISTORICAL NOTES, AND MEMOIRS OF THE AUTHOR. VOLUME TH E FIRST - THIRD. A 64 mm round illustration of Kings portrait. Under the portrait a verse; "His eye was keen, with sweetness aptly mix'd". (there are similar little verses under volumes second and third). LONDON, PRINTED FOR THE EDITOR; AND SOLD BY M. CONANT, SUCCESSOR TO MR. WHISTON, IN FLEET-STREET. MDCCLXXVI.
FIRST COLLECTED EDITION. 190 x 130 mm. VOL.1: Marbled inside board and end paper. 2nd fep. Half Title. [1] Title page. [1] 1p Dedication by anonymous editor. [1] vii - viii Advertisement. ix - xxxii Memoirs of Dr King. 2p Reflections. 3 - 280. 281 - 282 Contents of vol.1. 1 fep. 2nd fep. marbled on verso and also back inside board. VOL.2: Marbled inside board and end paper. 2nd fep. Half Title. [1] Title page. [1] 2p The Transactioneer;. 3 - 6 Preface. 7 - 308. fep. 2nd fep. marbled on verso and also back inside board. VOL.3: Marbled inside board and end paper. 2nd fep. Half Title. [1] Title page. [1] 3 - 308. 309 -313 Index. 314 -315 Contents of Vol.111. On last verso Publishing advertisement. 1 fep. 2nd fep. marbled on verso and also back inside board. The three volumes beautifully bound in quarter bottle-green morocco with same for tips. the boards in marbled paper. All in very fine condition.
- Dr William King LL.D. was a great reader, academic and writer. His writing and poetry were scattered and had not been compiled. These three volumes are the first collected and original works in verse and prose brought together in 1776, and edited by John Nicols of the Antiquarian Society. Of interest to the collector of cookery books is the 'Art of Cookery' in the first volume. This had been printed separately in 1708. (see item 10939 on this site). Dr King is a humorous writer and this first edition of his collected works are very scarce. He was born in London, the son of Ezekiel King and related to the family of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon. From Westminster School, he was a scholar at the age of 18 and was elected to Christ Church, Oxford in 1681. There he is said to have dedicated himself completely to his studies. In 1688 he graduated M.A. Taking up civil law, he became Doctor in 1692, and was admitted an advocate at Doctors' Commons. In 1702, having moved to Ireland, he was made Judge of the Admiralty, Commissioner of the Prizes, Keeper of the Records in Birmingham's Tower, and Vicar-General to Narcissus Marsh the primate. King found a friend in Anthony Upton, one of the High Court judges, who had a house called Mountown, near Dublin, where King frequently stayed. Both men were severely criticised by their political opponents for neglecting their official duties: it was said that they had no thought but to live out their days in rural retirement. In 1708, when Lord Wharton was sent to govern Ireland, King returned to London. In 1710 he became a supporter of the High Church party, on the side of Henry Sacheverell; In the autumn of 1712, King's health declined and he died on Christmas Day.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11281