Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - The first 1936 'Trade' edition - 1st issue. Rare.
The Joy of Cooking
By IRMA S. ROMBAUER. A Compilation of Reliable Recipes with a Casual Culinary Chat - Illustrations. Marion Rombauer Becker. THE BOBS-MERRILL COMPANY. Publishers. INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK.
FIRST TRADE EDITION -- 1ST ISSUE. 1936. Pp. 1 fep. Title page. 1pp. Dedication. 1pp. Forward. 4pp. Contents. Half title. (1-628) 2fep. Original blue and cream/light brown multi lined checked cloth boards with black square on the front cover with the book title. Original spine very nicely relaid on blue leather with original book title laid down. Covers very slight fading and browning. Internally very slight age browning, as expected. Overall a very nice solid copy of the very scarce 1936 edition, first issue. NB: Some bibliographers state the first edition - first issue comes only in a yellow checked cover. This is not true. This copy in blue checked cover is the second one seen as well as one with a yellow cover, both true 1st editions, 1st issues with no further issued printing information.
- This edition is generally known as the 'First Trade Edition’ of 1936. Irma Rombauer, recently widowed, (her husband committed suicide) sunk half of her inheritance of $6000.oo into a self-published run of 3000 copies of the 1931 ‘family edition’ of the Joy of Cooking and gave them out to family, friends and acquaintances. Published by A.C. Clayton of St Louis (a company which had never published a book before but printed labels for fancy St Louis shoe companies and for Listerine). Eventually all 3000 copies were given away or sold. Encouraged by the response, Irma Rombauer, on May 1st, 1936, published the first ‘trade edition’ of the Joy of Cooking with Bobbs-Merrill Company - Indianapolis and New York. The larger 1936 edition contained 628 pages and copies published were: 1st printing - 10,000 of which a respectable 6,838 copies sold in the first 6 months. 2nd printing of 1938 – 10,000. 3rd printing of 1939 – 10,000. 4th printing of 1940 – 10,000. 5th printing of 1941 – 10,000. 6th printing of 1941 – 10,000. Between 1936 and the end of 1942 -- 52,151 copies of the first trade edition were sold. The 2nd edition of June 7th 1943 had an increased 884 pages and 167,261 copies were sold. The first trade edition pioneered a new recipe format: first a chronological listing of ingredients and then instruction for preparation, what we now know as 'action format'. Unfortunately, Irma signed a contract which assigned the copyright of both the 1931 and 1936 editions to Bobbs-Merrill, a situation that would in the years to come, badly strain both parties. Anne Mendelson author of 'Stand Facing the Stove' informs; The editions that mark genuine stages of the book's developement are eight in number: the original privately published 'Joy of Cooking' [1931], this Bobbs-Merrill edition [1936] the best-selling wartime edition [1943], the first postwar edition [1946], (actually printed from the 1943 plates with a very few changes), the first Rombauer-Becker edition [1951], the unauthorised edition [1962], the first authorised edition prepared by Irma's daughter, Marion (Rombauer) Becker [1963], and Marion's last revision [1975].

click on image to enlarge
Information

Modern category
ref number: 10937

Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - The very rare first 'Family' edition
The Joy of Cooking
By Irma S. Rombauer. A Compilation of Reliable Recipes with a Casual Culinary Chat - Illustrations. Marion Rombauer.
FIRST FAMILY EDITION. 1931. A.C. Clayton Printing Company, St. Louis, MO. 8vo. 1fep. Title page. 2p Preface . 4p Rules and Contents. 24p Index. 1-395. The errata line on page 370, handwritten by Irma Rombauer for the missing first line at the top of the recipe for Orange Paste with Nuts. This is found in all other copies of the first Family edition. Several handwritten recipes on last 7 blanks and the paste-down. Very slight age yellowing to pages but internally quite clean. Original full blue pebbled cloth binding with gilt lettering on the front cover which is very slightly marked. Overall in very good condition. A nice copy of an extremely rare book.
- This edition is generally referred to as the 'First Family Edition' of 1931. Published by A.C. Clayton of St Louis (a company which had never published a book before but printed labels for fancy St Louis shoe companies and for Listerine). Irma Rombauer, fifty-four years old and recently widowed, (her husband committed suicide) sunk half of her inheritance of $6000.oo into a self-published run of 3000 copies of the 1931 edition and gave them out to family, friends and acquaintances. Eventually all 3000 copies were given away or sold. The book was priced at $2.25 with Irma receiving $1.17. Encouraged by the response, Irma Rombauer, in 1936, published the first ‘trade edition’ of 'The Joy of Cooking' with Bobbs-Merrill Company - Indianapolis and New York and being sold for around $3.oo. The Joy of Cooking is one of the most successful cookery books ever published and is still in print today. Compared to many other cookery books, the recipes are also very accurate.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Modern category
ref number: 10936

Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - A lovely miniature
The Joy of Cooking
by Irma S. Rombauer. Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker. Illustrated by Laura Hartman Maestro. RUNNING PRESS. PHILADELPHIA. LONDON.
Text block 2 1/2"W x 3"H. Pp. Half title. Title page. 1pp Contents. (6-252) Beautifully bound in full mid-tan calf with gilt borders to boards. With the binding 2 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H x 1 1/2" thick. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and two labels - one red and one black with gilt lettering. All edges gilt. Internally - as new.
- This little thick tome is an unusual and very handsome edition of "the Joy of Cooking. A Running Press Miniature Edition, copyrighted 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc. A real collectors item for a miniature or cookery book collection.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Modern category
ref number: 10938

Rose.   Giles     - Complete copy of one of the rarest cookery books
A perfect School of INSTRUCTIONS For the Officers of the Mouth:
SHEWING The Whole ART of A Master of the Household, A Master Carver, A Master Butler, A Master Confectioner, A Master Cook, A Master Pastryman. Being a Work of singular Use for Ladies and Gentlewomen, and all Persons whatsoever that are desirous to be acquainted with the most Excellent ARTS of Carving, Cookery, Pastry, Preserving, and Laying a Cloth for Grand Entertainments. The like never before extant in any Language. Adorned with Pictures curiously Ingraven, displaying the whole Arts. By Giles Rose one of the Master Cooks in His Majesties Kitchen. LONDON, Printed for R. Bentley and M. Magnes, in Russel-street in Covent Garden, 1682.
FIRST and SOLE ENGLISH EDITION. 12mo. 2fep. Title Page with single line border. 8pp The Dedication. 10pp To the Reader. 4pp The Contents. 1-563 [1] 2fep. Forty two woodcut illustrations (most of which are full page) in the text. Internally very clean with no browning or foxing. Contemporary dark brown calf with double blind-fillet around the sides. Red morocco label with gilt lettering. Raised bands and overall, a nice patina. An exceptional rarity.
- The rare English edition of 'L'Ecole Parfaite des Officers de Bouche' first edition - 1662. One of the most important and popular titles of 17th century French Gastronomy. This English edition comprises of the six original books, (and not five as is sometimes supposed) 'Le Maistre de Hostel; or, Steward of a Family; 'Le grand Escuyer tranchant; or, The Great Master Carver; 'Le Sommelier Royal; or, The Royal Butler; 'Le Confiturier Royal; or, The Royal Confectioner; 'Le Cuisinier Royal; or, The Royal French Master Cook; and 'Le Pastissier Royal; or, The Royal Pastry Cook'. Including numerous, remarkable and primitive woodcuts depict table settings and various carving methods, including more than fifty ways of carving fruit. An interesting aside is that the engraved plates mirror (especially the fruit carvings) the very rare treatise on the art of carving by Jacques Vontet's - 'L'art de Trancher la Viande et Toutes Sortes des Fruits' [circa Lyon 1647]. Oxford states "It seems an excellent book, although it contains some strange things: 'Wine for the Gods', 'Sauce d'Enfer', 'Sheeps Feet for an Afternoon drinking" There are directions for folding napkins. There are dozens of ways of cooking eggs -- 'Eggs a l'Intrigue', 'Eggs a la Negligence', etc - and dozens of different pies and tarts, including 'a tart of frogs', 'a tart made with tortoise' and Sausages made from the Brain of a Capon'. Simon Gough states with insight in one of his wonderfully eccentric catalogues 'Food for Thought' -- "it is curious how few great collections of cookery books contain this volume". By way of an answer, he further proclaims, -- "It is one of the rarest cookery books in the English language" In past years at auction, there are no copies in any of the great cookery book collections of Schraemli, Westbury, Simon, Lambert, Crahan, Wretman, Marks. There was an incomplete copy from Simon Hall's collection, sold at the Dominic Winter Book Auctions in 2005. In the 80's Simon Gough had the complete 'Lister' copy for sale in his 47th catalogue. The Lister copy came up again at auction in the Cetus Library sale at Bloomsbury Books on Sept. 22nd 2011, proving just how very few there are in circulation. No more than three recorded; with one of them incomplete. OCLC indicates eight copies only; Bitting p. 407; Cagle 970; Wing R1933.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10959

Royal Menu       - From Osborne House.
Her Majesty Queen Victoria's Dinner
Dated Monday August 29th, 1900.
225 x 140mm. Thick cardboard. Handwritten in ink in a neat script. The menu and the border are very bright. The edges are rubbed and slightly spotted and browned. Overall slightly age browned. Housed in a marbled cardboard folder with a label on the front cover. Overall a very nice item of very rare Royal ephemera. Queen Victoria died on January 21st 1901. Her Majesty had this dinner 5 months before.
- Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight. The house and its 800 hectare estate was bought from Lady Isabella Blachford in 1845, demolished, and a new house built by 1851 as a summer retreat for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Prince Albert designed the house himself in the style of an Italian Renaissance palazzo. The builder was Thomas Cubitt, the London architect and builder whose company built the main façade of Buckingham Palace for the royal couple in 1847. At Osborne an earlier smaller house on the site was demolished to make way for the new and far larger house. Queen Victoria died at Osborne House in January of 1901. Following her death, the house became surplus to royal requirements and was given to the state with a few rooms retained as a private royal museum dedicated to Queen Victoria. From 1903 until 1921 it was used as a junior officer training college for the Royal Navy known as the Royal Naval College, Osborne. Today it is fully open to the public. The house consisted of the original square wing known as 'The Pavilion', which contained the principal and royal apartments. The apartments contain reminders of Victoria's dynastic links with the other European royal families. The Billiard Room houses a massive porcelain vase, which was a gift of the Russian Tsar. The grandeur of the Billiard Room, the Queen's Dining Room and the Drawing Room on the ground floor forms a marked contrast with the much more homely and unassuming decor of the royal apartments on the first floor. These rooms contain the Prince's Dressing Room, the Queen's Sitting Room, the Queen's Bedroom and the children's nurseries, which were intended for private domestic use, and were therefore arranged to be as comfortable as possible. Both Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were determined to bring up their children in as natural and loving environment as their situation allowed so that as a consequence the royal children visited their parents' bedrooms when other children of a similar status lived in a far more detached manner. The 'main wing', containing the household accommodation, council and audience chambers were added later. The final addition to the house was a wing built between 1890 and 1891. It contains on the ground floor the famous Durbar Room which is named after an anglicised version of the Hindi word darbar. This word means court. The Durbar Room was built for state functions and decorated by Bhai Ram Singh in an elaborate and intricate style, with a carpet from Agra. It now contains the gifts Queen Victoria received on her Golden and Diamond Jubilees. These include engraved silver and copper vases, Indian armour and even a model of an Indian palace. The Indian associations of Osborne House also include a collection of paintings of Indian persons and scenes, painted at Queen Victoria's request by Rudolf Swoboda. There are both depictions of Indians resident or visiting Britain in the 19th Century and scenes painted in India itself when the painter went there for the purpose. The first floor of the new wing was for the sole use of Princess Beatrice and her family. Beatrice was the Queen's youngest daughter, who remained permanently at her side. The royal family stayed at Osborne for lengthy periods each year: in the spring for Victoria's birthday in May; in July and August when they celebrated Albert's birthday; and just before Christmas. In a break from the past, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert allowed photographers and painters to capture their family in the grounds and in the house, partly for their own enjoyment and partly as a form of propaganda for the nation to show what a happy and devoted family they were. Many thousands of prints of the royal family were sold to the public which led Victoria to remark, "no Sovereign was ever more loved than I am, I am bold enough to say." Writing to her daughter Victoria in 1858 about the gloominess of Windsor Castle, Queen Victoria stated, "I long for our cheerful and un-palace like rooms at Osborne." The domestic idyll at Osborne was not to continue. In December 1861, Prince Albert died at Windsor Castle. During her widowhood, Osborne House continued as one of Queen Victoria's favourite homes. Today, Osborne House is under the care of English Heritage and is open to the public from spring through to autumn. The former Naval College's cricket pavilion was converted into a holiday cottage in 2004 and can be booked by members of the public. Guests staying at the cottage are given the right to use the Osborne Estate private beach. Photographs 4 and 5 below show Osborne House as it is today. Photograph number 6 is a print of a painting in 1870 by Sir Edwin Landseer, of Queen Victoria and John Brown at Osborne. In it the Queen sits grandly on her horse while perusing state documents. On the ground are discarded documents and the Queen's gloves beside the red dispatch box. John Brown deigns not to pick them up, instead he rigidly guards the Queen's security and safety by not letting go of the horses reins. By the horse we see an amusing vignette of a small black scotch terrier on hind legs with paws together in a frozen pose of absolute devotion. The elaborate and decorous menu on offer here also gives a glimpse of the ultimate privilege of Victoria's household.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11141

Royal Menu.      
Luncheon for Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.
CORPORATION OF LONDON LUNCHEON AT GUILDHALL to HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN and HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH Upon Their return from Their Tour of Commonwealth and other Countries FRIDAY, 10th MARCH, 1961 The Right Honourable the Lord Mayor SIR BERNARD NATHANIEL WALEY-COHEN. COLONEL RICHARD HOME STUDHOLME, O.B.E., M.A., Alderman. ADAM KENNEDY KIRK Sheriffs. WALTER BASIL HOLDEN Chairman of the Special Reception Committee.
285x210mm. A highly decorated menu in hard cardboard with folded outer cover and 2 folded sheets inside making 4 leaves and eight pages. Top cover. [1] Title page. 1p Guildhall history. 1p Music Programme by the Royal Marine Orchestra. 1p Menu and Wines. 1p Toasts. 2p Names of the Special Reception Committee. 1p Explanation of the cover design. [1] Back cover plain. Inside are 2 folded sheets with Coats of Arms and the precise ceremonial arrangements for the day. All sheets held together with a red and white decorative cord. Housed in a neat marbled cardboard folder with a label on the front cover. A very clean, handsome item of Royal ephemera.
- The Queen and Prince Philip had just visited India, Pakistan, Nepal and Iran. The very colourful water-coloured front cover of the menu depicts impressions of the Commonwealth tour just undertaken. At the top are two drawings of Buckingham Palace and London Airport, depicting points of departure for the tour. In the left panel is the 238 foot Qutab Minar, Delhi, one of the highest stone towers in the world. This is followed at the bottom left, by the Taj Mahal at Agra. On the bottom right we find an impression of Mount Everest in Nepal. In the lower portion of the right panel an image of an Iranian mosque with beautiful Minarets. Lastly above this, two vignettes of Pakistan; Frere Hall, Karachi and the Harbour. On page 2 an essay on the interesting history of the Guildhall. We learn that the Hall and its environs have been consecrated to civic government for more that 1000 years. Two major fires in 1666 and 1941 enveloped the hall. The crypt, porch and mediaeval walls are still original, emerging from the flames without irreparable damage. Each year the Mayor and Sheriffs are elected by the Liverymen after meeting in the Common Hall. In the UK, the Guildhall is one of the most important places of high ceremony. It hosts many important banquets to the Sovereign and Members of the Royal Family, Prime Ministers, Ministers of State and Foreign Leaders. A very interesting document as well as being a menu.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11142

Royal Menus.      
Four Royal Menus from various Royal Palaces.
1 -- Windsor Castle. 23rd January and 20th June. 1908. 2 -- Buckingham Palace. Friday. November 26th 1982. 3 -- Barmoral Castle. 1st September. 1912.
1 -- Two clean but slightly age browned (one a little more than the other) menu cards, edged in gilt with the crest of Edward VII. One is printed and the other is in very small neat hand writing, both in French. 2 -- Very clean menu card, edged in gilt with the crest of Queen Elizabeth. A simple menu printed in French. 3 -- Clean but slightly age browned menu card, edged in gilt with the crest of George V. A simple menu written by hand in light blue ink, and in French. All housed in a cardboard, marbled folder with a label on the front cover.
- Looking at these menus, one is immediately struck by; A - The are all written in French including the dates. B - They are all in the same format and size. Considering they span nearly 80 years, it is amazing. This gives a singular impression that things do not change in the Royal Households. Still keeping a tradition of writing their daily menus in French and not English, especially since modern British cookery has developed its own repertoire to such a high level and British chefs now compare with the best France has to offer. Quite rare and interesting items of Royal ephemera spanning two Royal Castles, a Palace and three Monarchs.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 10994

Rundell.   Mrs     - A rare second edition - 1st issue.
A NEW SYSTEM OF DOMESTIC COOKERY;
FORMED UPON PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMY. And adapted to the Use of PRIVATE FAMILIES. BY A LADY. A NEW EDITION, CORRECTED. LONDON: PRINTED FOR JOHN MURRAY, FLEET-STREET; J.HARDING, ST.JAMES'S-STREET; AND A.CONSTABLE AND CO. EDINBURGH; At the Union Printing-Office, St.John's Square, by W.Wilson. 1807. Price Seven Shillings and Sixpence.
Small 12mo. 2nd edition - 1st issue. (The second issue has considerably more pages) 2feps. [1] Frontispiece. Title page. [1] (Entered at Stationers Hall) 1p Advertisement. 1p Directions to Binder. p18 Contents. 1-xxx Miscellaneous Observations with seven plates of carving meats. 1+2-323. [1] 1+326-351. 3p Advertisements. 2feps. Half crushed dark tan calf spine and corners with marbled boards. Spine with raised bands, gilt tooling and lettering. Original uncut paper edges. Internally, slightly dusty but overall very clean. A very nice copy.
- Maria Rundell was the original ‘domestic goddess.’ An elderly Edinburgh widow whose best-selling book on cookery, medicinal remedies and household management defined the perfect home. ‘A New System of Domestic Cookery’ was a publishing sensation in the early 1800s. It sold half a million copies and conquered America, and its profits helped found one of the Victorian era's most influential Edinburgh based publishing empires, one which boasted Lord Byron, Charles Darwin, Sir Walter Scott, Jane Austen, Benjamin Disraeli and Arthur Conan Doyle among its authors. Nearly 180 years after her death, the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh holds one of the most significant single collections of papers on 19th century literature. The ‘John Murray Archive’ compiled by the seven generations of Murrays, was recently bought by the library, for the staggering sum of £31,000,000, chiefly with lottery money. It includes 150,000 pages of letters, manuscripts and documents from some of the most significant thinkers, scientists and writers of modern history. Scholars have largely ignored Mrs Rundell, a friend of the Murrays and the widow of a surgeon from Bath, and overlooked her remarkable role in the company's success - a success soured by a bitter feud. In 1805, aged 61, she had sent the second John Murray, the son of the Scottish printer who set up a small publishers in London in 1768, an unedited collection of recipes, remedies and advice on running a home. She had compiled it originally for her seven daughters, and offered it to Murray free of charge. Murray recognised its potential. It was some 60 years since the first English cookery book had been written by Hannah Glasse, and Mrs Rundell's 'New System of Domestic Cookery, Formed upon Principles of Economy and Adapted to the Use of Private Families by a Lady', was about to become the bible for Britain's 19th century bourgeoisie. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography describes it as "the earliest manual of household management with any pretensions to completeness, it called forth many imitations". Stored in a double-locked 'cage' in the library's vault, Murray’s firm's 'subscriptions book' for November 21 1805 reveals advance sales of 310 copies. In July 1807 booksellers placed advance orders for 1,150 copies for this edition. By 1841 it had run to 65 British editions, selling 10,000 copies a year. It was snapped up in Britain's colony, America, where it was retitled "American Domestic Cookery and The Experienced American Housekeeper" and there ran to 37 editions, and was translated into German. It sold more than 245,000 copies in the UK, remaining in print until the 1880s. Its profits enabled Murray to buy one of the most famous addresses in literature - 50 Albemarle Street, Mayfair. Doubling up as the publisher's offices and home, Albemarle Street's drawing room became the location for some of the most influential gatherings in 19th century English literature. Murray's guests would include Isaac Disraeli, father of the future Prime Minister, George Canning, a Foreign Secretary and briefly Prime Minister, Sir Walter Scott and Lord Byron. The poet was one of Murray's biggest signings. The archive reveals that Mrs Rundell and her publisher soon fell out. In 1807, the year of this edition on offer, the author wrote angry letters about errors in the new edition. She said: "I am hourly struggling against my feelings, but they are grievously wounded." It had been "miserably prepared". Corrected editions soon appeared, but by 1814 their relationship had collapsed. Convinced Murray was neglecting her book, she offered a revised version to a rival, Longmans. They issued injunctions against each other. Mrs Rundell prevented Murray from republishing the book after his rights expired. Murray blocked her rival version, rightly claiming he had improved and "embellished" the book. Their battle ended in 1821, when the Lord Chancellor cancelled both injunctions and asked them to settle privately. In February 1823 a legal agreement records that Murray paid her "the sum of two thousand and one hundred pounds of good and lawful money". Later, Mrs Rundell moved to Lausanne, Switzerland, where she died in 1828, aged 83. It was only then that her authorship was revealed. Online, at auction, in dealer’s catalogues and in book shops, later editions by Rundell are numerous and very common. We are informed erroneously in some bibliographies, that this 1807 copy is the rare first edition. In fact the first was published 1805/1806 in a very small number. This copy is the equally scarce second edition, of which only a little over a thousand copies were published. This is an exceptionally clean, untrimmed copy; A real collectors item.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11042

Sala.   George Augustus     - With a brief note signed by G.A. Sala
The Thorough Good Cook
A SERIES OF NOTES ON THE CULINARY ART AND NINE HUNDRED RECIPES BY GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA. CASSELL AND COMPANY, Limited LONDON, PARIS & MELBOURNE 1895 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
FIRST AND SOLE ENGLISH EDITION. 210x172mm. Paste-down and fep in designed paper. On verso of fep: a tipped-in note on Reform Club embossed paper stating "Reform Club: Thursday. Dr Sir a line to say that I shall be duly with you a little before 8. Faithfully Yours G.A. Sala. (underlined) The Rev. T. Shore." Half Title. Verso advertisement for Sala's books. Title Page. Verso with a small illustrated device titled 'Belle Sauvage'. (1)vi-viii Preface 1. (1)x-xiii Preface 11. (1)xv-xvii Preface 111. 2p Contents. [1] (1)2-467. [1] (1)470-492 Index. Fep and paste-down in designed paper. The fine tooled and embossed original cover with gilt still in very good condition but the spine and the back edge of covers are sunned. All edges gilt. Internally very clean and in very good condition. An uncommon book especially with the autographed note.
- George Augustus Sala, (see 1st photo below) the youngest son of Augustus Sala (1792-1828) and Henrietta Simon (1789-1860), was born on 24th November, 1828. After the death of his father, George's mother supported herself and five surviving children by teaching singing and giving annual concerts in London and Brighton. Educated at the Pestalozzian school at Turnham Green, Sala left at fifteen to become a clerk. Later he found work drawing railway plans during the Railway Mania of 1845. A talented artist, Sala also worked as a scene-painter at the Lyceum Theatre and in 1848 was commissioned to illustrate Albert Smith's 'The Man in the Moon'. This was followed by an illustrated guidebook for foreign tourists that was published by Rudolf Ackermann. Other work included prints of the Great Exhibition and the funeral of the Duke of Wellington. Sala was also interested in becoming a journalist and in 1851 Charles Dickens accepted his article, 'The Key of the Street', for his journal, 'Household Words'. This was the first of many of Sala's articles that Dickens published over the next few years. In April, 1856, Dickens sent Sala to Russia as the journal's special correspondent. He also contributed to the author's next venture, 'All the Year Round' and other journals such as the 'London Illustrated News', 'Punch Magazine' and 'Cornhill Magazine'. In 1857, Sala began writing for the 'Daily Telegraph'. For the next twenty-five years he contributed an average of ten articles a week. Although paid £2,000 a year for his work, Sala, who was an avid collector of rare books and expensive china, was always in debt. Sala loved traveling and in 1863 accepted the offer of becoming the Telegraph's foreign correspondent. Over the next few years he reported on wars and uprisings all over the world. During the Franco-German War he was arrested in Paris as a spy but was eventually released from prison. He wrote several books based on his travels including 'From Waterloo to the Peninsula' (1867), 'Rome and Venice' (1869), 'Paris' (1880), 'America Revisited' (1882), 'A Journey Due South' (1885) and 'Right Round the World' (1888). After leaving the Daily Telegraph Sala moved to Brighton where he attempted to start his own periodical, 'Sala's Journal'. The venture failed and left him deeply in debt and in early 1895 he was forced to sell his large library of 13,000 books. George Augustus Sala died at Brighton on 8th December, 1895. In an email I received from Linda Gifkins, she kindly informed me of a hitherto unknown edition of 'The Thorough Good Cook' printed by Brentano's - New York, Chicago, Paris, & Washington in 1896. Sala was twice married. His first wife, Harriet, whom he married in September 1859, died at Melbourne in December 1885. In 1891 he married a second wife, Bessie, third daughter of Robert Stannard, C.E., who survived him. Sala was a great friend of Alexis Soyer and was a member of the Reform Club whilst Soyer was the Chef de Cuisine there.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11144

Salmon.   William     - The very scarce first edition of 1695.
The Family Dictionary; or Houshold Companion:
Wherein Alphabetically laid down Exact Rules and ChoicePhysical RECEIPTS FOR The Preservation of Health, Prevention of Sickness, and Curing the several Diseases, Distempers, and Grievences, incident to Men, Women, and Children. Also, Directions for Making Oils, Ointements, Salves, Cordial-Waters, Powders, Pills, Bolus's, Lozenges, Chymical Pre-parations, Physical-Wines, Ales, and other Liquors, &c. and Descriptions of the Virtues of Herbs, Fruits, Flowers, Seeds, Roots, Barks, Minerals, and Parts of Living Crea-tures, Used in Medicinal Potions, &c. Likewise, Directions for Cookery, in Dressing Flesh, Fish, Fowl, Seasoning, Garnishing Sauces, and Serving-up in the Best and most acceptable Manner. The Whole ART of Patry, Conserving, Preserving, Candying, Confectionary &c. Also, The Way of Making all sorts of Perfumes, Beautifying-Waters, Pomatums, Washes, Sweet-Balls, Sweet-Bags, and Essences: Taking Spots, and Stains out of Garments, Lin-nen, &c. and Preserving them form Moths, &c. Wash-ing, or Brightning Tarnished Gold, or Silver Lace, Plate, &c. Together, With the Art of Making all sorts of English Mead, Metheglin, &c. And the ART of Fining, and Recovering Foul or Faded Wines. The MYSTERY of Pickling, and Keeping all Sorts of Pickles throughout the Year. To Which is Added, as an APPENDIX, The Explanation of Physical Terms, Bills of Fare in all Sea-sons of the Year. With the ART of CARVING. And many other Useful Matters. By J.H. London, Printed for W. Rhodes, at the Star, the Corner of Bride-Lane, in Fleetstreet, 1695.
FIRST EDITION. 12vo. 1fep. (missing first blank) Title page, slightly brittle at edges with no loss. On verso - Licensed, February the 28th 1695. 5p Preface. [1] AC-YO. (no page numbers, but complete.) 16p Appendix. 2fep. (one original) Pages uniformly age browned throughout. One page 'BL' has a 4" strip of the border with a very small loss of text. With modern full dark tan calf, with double fillets on the boards. Raised bands with blind tooled lines. With red label with gilt writing.
- Dr William Salmon, a noted Empiric, born 2nd of June 1644. According to an inscription under his portrait in ‘Ars Anatomica’, he studied and wrote a profusion of books on medicine, surgery, anatomy, pharmacology, astronomy, gardening, cookery, astrology, religion and translated several Latin medical classics into English. Salmon used the title of MD on his title pages, but according to Stanley H. Johnston, Jr., Curator of Rare Books at The Holden Arboretum, "most writers doubt that he was entitled to it. He still is somewhat difficult to assess since he is known to have amassed a 3,000 volume library containing many of the medical classics and produced several medical publications that were sufficiently erudite that his critics have claimed they were ghost-written for him." Rupert Halliwell at SimsReed Rare Books in London describes Salmon as a "learned man, with a taste for the obscure" and notes that his library, auctioned off after his death, "contained works in French, Greek, Latin and Hebrew, on medicine and other subjects." But his enemies asserted that his earliest education was from a charlatan with whom he travelled, and whose business he eventually inherited. And he seems ill-inclined to prove them wrong. He lived at a time long before hospitals had out-patient facilities. At this time "irregular practitioners" frequently lived near the gates of St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London. Their patients were those who could not or would not be admitted to the hospital. Salmon thus set up his stall near the Smithfield gate of St. Bartholomew's. It was there he "treated all diseases, sold special prescriptions of his own, as well as drugs in general, cast horoscopes, and professed alchemy," according to Norman Moore in his article about Salmon in the OUP's Dictionary of National Biography. Always game to write something different, in 1696, he published one of England's first cookery books. ‘The Family-Dictionary, or, Houshold Companion’. This volume is both a cookery book and a compendium of information for the home-maker, very much like the Household books of Isabella Beeton. It was meant to be the only household reference a housewife would need. Here is Salmon's very elegant recipe for Black-Pudding with no starch at all; To make this the best, and fare exceeding the common way. Boil the Umbles of a Hog tender, take some of the Lights [lungs] with the Heart, and all the Flesh about them, taking out the Sinews, and mincing the rest very small; do the like by the Liver: add grated Nutmeg, four or five Yolks of Eggs, a pint of Sweet Cream, a quarter of a pint of Canary [wine], Sugar, Cloves, Mace and Cinnamon finely powdered, a few Carraway-seeds, and a little Rose-water, a pretty quantity of Hog-fat, and some Salt: roul it up about two Hours before you put it into the Guts, then put it into them after you have rinsed them in Rose-water. The alphabetical format of Salmon's book is very strict so that the topic that immediately precedes ‘Black-Pudding’ is ‘Biting by a Snake, Adder, or Mad Dog.’ William Salmon’s name only appeared on the second edition, corrected and much enlarged of 1696 and with no mention of the J.H. on the title page of this copy. Oxford p45, cites the first of 1795; MacLean p128, the 4th of 1710 and a 4th with additions of 1734; Bitting p416, has the 1st and the 3rd of 1705. Cagle pp 706-707, cites the 1st and the 4th of 1710.

click on image to enlarge
Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11021