Ritz.   M.L.     - Signed by Madame Ritz.
Cesar Ritz.
A PARIS EDITIONS JULES TALLANDIER 17, RUE REMY-DUMONCEL.
FIRST EDITION. (copyright 1948) 1fep. Half Title with a dedication – “A Monsieur A. Kienberger Souvenir du Cinqn au tenaire en Jenuoiguage de Symphathie – Marie Louise Ritz. June 1948. (apologies for possible mistakes. Madame Ritz’s writing is hard to decipher). [2] Frontispiece photograph of Cesar Ritz. [1] 1p Dedication to Colonel Hans Pfyffer d’ Altishofon. [1] 1p Avertissement. [1] 11-285(1) 1fep. Numerous early full-page b/w photographs. Pages untrimmed and some uncut. Cream paper covers, with a picture of the Paris Ritz Hotel on the front. On the back a printers device.
- This is the story of a great Hotelier written by his dedicated wife Marie Louise Ritz. She was also a very experienced Hotelier in her own right, taking over the running of the Ritz Hotels after Cesar’s well documented breakdown. Even tho’ the last years of Ritz’s life were sad, he made a fundamental and profound change to Hotels. His innovations are little realised, even by those at the top of the industry today. What Cesar Ritz consciously set out to achieve was design hotels from the ground up for the benefit of women only. Using all the new inventions like electricity, hot water in bathrooms in each room, beautiful feminine furnishings and décor and above all fine food. To that end he teamed up with his old colleague & collaborator Auguste Escoffier, the great Chef. Escoffier joined Ritz at his first venture in England in April 1890, at the newly built Savoy Hotel. Escoffier had initially refused to join Ritz in London, but after a visit, he was overwhelmed by the innovative beauty of the new hotel and took charge of the kitchens. This was the final arrangement that assured the Savoy's success. Ritz very astutely understood that if women were enticed thro the doors of his well thought out establishments, and above all felt comfortable there, their men would follow. This proved to be a huge success, causing an industry sea-change, highlighting the poor way hotels had operated up until then, having always been designed solely for the use of men. Women had not frequented these places since their inception centuries before. Now Ritz’s hotels had a huge customer increase, targeting approximately 50% of the population that had never eaten out before. Not only that, the occupancy of hotel rooms increased dramatically. In the book Madame Ritz tells of his triumphs with understandable pride, filling her pages with the names of royalty, statesmen, famous beauties and those who follow them. Discretion prevents her from making her book more than a collection of society-gossip paragraphs, but the collection covers a period of great social change. Ritz was successful because he anticipated most of those changes; many distinguished people saw their first real bathroom in a Ritz hotel. Marie-Louise Ritz, nee Beck, was born in Alsace on the 29th October 1867, the daughter of a hotelier family. Her mother owned a small hotel in Menton. On 16th January 1888, 38 year old Caesar Ritz married the well educated and multi-lingual young lady who was only 21 years old. Before the marriage there had been a long period of friendship and companionship. Their wedding took place in Cannes. Marie-Louise Ritz gave birth to two sons: Charles and René Ritz. Cesar was the undoubted star of the hotel industry, and was managing up to ten hotels at the zenith of his accomplishments. Shortly after that he began to suffer from breakdowns and depression. In 1902 his illness forced him to pass over his business to his wife Marie-Louise Ritz. She carried on her husband's hotel empire as first hotel manageress in the world. Caesar Ritz retreated to his beloved home village Niederwald, in Central Switzerland, for the last 16 years. He died in a clinic on the 25th October 1918. Marie-Louise had him buried in the graveyard of Père Lachaisein, Paris. On Saturday 14th January, 1961, a special train from Paris took the small coffin of the deceased Marie-Louise Ritz, and in a larger one, containing the disinterred bodies of Caesar Ritz and his son René Ritz. The two coffins were laid out in the birth house of Caesar on the outskirts of the little village. The village people walked by loyally until Monday and prayed for their great son and his family. On Monday morning the two coffins were then laid out on the village square next to the Ritz Memorial Well. On the same day a special train brought the mourners. At the head of the group was Cesar & Louise’s first-born son, 70 year old Charles Ritz, the owner of the Hotel Ritz in Paris. The whole village of Niederwald took part in the burial with all of the older generation who knew the Ritz family personally. The press of the world were also present. This is a story of a couple who, thro’ very hard work, vast experience, attention to the finest details, achieved a lasting reputation for the highest quality and service that even earned them lasting affection and gratitude from not only the elite of European society, but all the people that benefited from their enterprise.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11229

Robuchon   Joel     - Signed by Robuchon and Patricia Wells
Cuisine Actuelle
Patricia Wells PRESENTS THE CUISINE OF JOEL ROBUCHON Photographs by Steven Rothfield M MACMILLAN LONDON
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION 1993. 197x254mm. 1fep. Half Title with a planche with Robechon and Wells signatures. [1] Title Page. [1] 2p Acknowledgements. 1p Contents. Verso 1p List of Illustrations. (1)2-4 The Cuisine of Joel Robuchon. (1)6-8 An Interview with Joel Robuchon. (1)10 About Joel Robuchon. (1)12 Translating Three Star Concepts to the Home. (1) 15-316. (1)318-327 Index. [1} 1fep. With D/J in fine condition. Fully bound in black cloth with gilt tooling on cover and spine. Internally and externally as new. The signatures proclaim - 'Joel ma sympathic gourmande Robuchon' and 'To simple pleasures, memorable meals! Patricia Wells'
- This is a less sumptuous copy of the American edition of the same Robuchon book titled 'Simply French'. Renamed 'Cuisine Actuelle', and even though it is aimed at the housewife, the recipes are still daunting. With subtle alterations to suit the English palate and market, it is never the less a very good cook book. Robuchon's stature as a great chef is plain to see.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11095

Robuchon.   Joel     - With Robuchon's signature.
Simply French
PATRICIA WELLS presents the cuisine of JOEL ROBUCHON Photographs by Steven Rothfield Jacket photographs by Robert Freson William Morrow and Company, Inc. New York (With coloured borders at the top and bottom of the page and a coloured design)
FIRST EDITION 1991. 4to. 263x210mm. 1fep with small illustration. Half title with a photograph and coloured borders at the top and bottom of the page and a coloured design. [1] 1p Advertisement. Frontispiece coloured photograph. Title page. Verso with printers info and ISBN. Dedication page with a handmade paper planche with Robuchon's signature in ink. [1] 9-10 Acknowledgements. p11 Contents. p12 with Coloured Photo. 13-354. 355-367 Index. Verso - A note about the Authors. 1fep. All pages with border top and bottom. Many full page coloured photographs throughout. A full mylar cream coloured binding with silver writing on the spine. With the original dj. As new inside and out.
- Joel Robuchon's book 'Simply French' is an attempt by Robuchon to 'translate' three star concepts to the home. The chef and owner of the three Michelin starred Parisien restaurant Jamin, describes his cooking, within the context and impact of Nouvelle Cuisine as 'Cuisine Actuelle'. When reading this impressive book one wonders how the housewife would manage with the 'Ivory Turbans of Shrimp and Pasta' or 'Festive Shrimp Salad' or afford the Caviar, Truffles, Lobster etc. To be fair a lot of the recipes are simplified and one may feel inspired after reading the interviews and introduction at the beginning. Robuchon, a very influential force in French, English and European gastronomy, has, with the help of Patricia Wells brought out an impressive and well designed book that belongs at the forefront of any modern cookery book collection.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11076

Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - A lovely miniature
The Joy of Cooking
by Irma S. Rombauer. Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker. Illustrated by Laura Hartman Maestro. RUNNING PRESS. PHILADELPHIA. LONDON.
Text block 2 1/2"W x 3"H. Pp. Half title. Title page. 1pp Contents. (6-252) Beautifully bound in full mid-tan calf with gilt borders to boards. With the binding 2 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H x 1 1/2" thick. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines and two labels - one red and one black with gilt lettering. All edges gilt. Internally - as new.
- This little thick tome is an unusual and very handsome edition of "the Joy of Cooking. A Running Press Miniature Edition, copyrighted 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc. A real collectors item for a miniature or cookery book collection.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 10938

Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - The very rare first 'Family' edition
The Joy of Cooking
By Irma S. Rombauer. A Compilation of Reliable Recipes with a Casual Culinary Chat - Illustrations. Marion Rombauer.
FIRST FAMILY EDITION. 1931. A.C. Clayton Printing Company, St. Louis, MO. 8vo. 1fep. Title page. 2p Preface . 4p Rules and Contents. 24p Index. 1-395. The errata line on page 370, handwritten by Irma Rombauer for the missing first line at the top of the recipe for Orange Paste with Nuts. This is found in all other copies of the first Family edition. Several handwritten recipes on last 7 blanks and the paste-down. Very slight age yellowing to pages but internally quite clean. Original full blue pebbled cloth binding with gilt lettering on the front cover which is very slightly marked. Overall in very good condition. A nice copy of an extremely rare book.
- This edition is generally referred to as the 'First Family Edition' of 1931. Published by A.C. Clayton of St Louis (a company which had never published a book before but printed labels for fancy St Louis shoe companies and for Listerine). Irma Rombauer, fifty-four years old and recently widowed, (her husband committed suicide) and with the encouragement of her son, Edgar Jr., and her daughter, Marion, sunk half of her inheritance of $6000.oo into a self-published run of 3000 copies of the 1931 edition and gave them out to family, friends and acquaintances. Eventually all 3000 copies were given away or sold. The book was priced at $2.25 with Irma receiving $1.17. Encouraged by the response, Irma Rombauer, in 1936, published the first ‘trade edition’ of 'The Joy of Cooking' with Bobbs-Merrill Company - Indianapolis and New York and being sold for around $3.oo. This is a cookery book that imbibes the definitive American character trait of restless innovation and change. The first chapter after the large early index is titled Cocktails. There one finds unusual items such as a 'Clam Juice Cocktail' (a concoction of seasoned, bottled Clam Broth with Paprika, Horseradish and Tabasaco Sauce). 'Oyster Cocktail with Catsup' follows with 'Shrimp in Grapefruit' following later. The next chapter is Canapes and Sandwiches, with one recipe for 'Pastry Snails'. Irma prefaces this recipe by informing us that "If the approval of guests is to be taken as a criterion of excellence, this is the prize winning Canape". This also highlights another fine American trait; that of generosity. Bearing in mind the date this book was printed, those unusual recipes also sit with other good, well known, early American dishes. If one takes into account that the most recent 'Joy of Cooking' issue celebrating the seventy-fifth anniversary edition, printed Oct. 31st 2006, and numbering a whopping 1,152 pages, proves the enduring affection in which this cookery book is held. If one takes into account the very good accurate recipes of later modern versions and the fact it is one of the longest, continuously printed cookery books, then it must be viewed undoubtedly, as one of the great domestic cookery classics.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 10936

Rombauer.   Irma Starkloff     - The first 1936 'Trade' edition - 1st issue. Rare.
The Joy of Cooking
By IRMA S. ROMBAUER. A Compilation of Reliable Recipes with a Casual Culinary Chat - Illustrations. Marion Rombauer Becker. THE BOBS-MERRILL COMPANY. Publishers. INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK.
FIRST TRADE EDITION -- 1ST ISSUE. 1936. Pp. 1 fep. Title page. 1pp. Dedication. 1pp. Forward. 4pp. Contents. Half title. (1-628) 2fep. Original blue and cream/light brown multi lined checked cloth boards with black square on the front cover with the book title. Original spine very nicely relaid on blue leather with original book title laid down. Covers very slight fading and browning. Internally very slight age browning, as expected. Overall a very nice solid copy of the very scarce 1936 edition, first issue. NB: Some bibliographers state the first edition - first issue comes only in a yellow checked cover. This is not true. This copy in blue checked cover is the second one seen as well as one with a yellow cover, both true 1st editions, 1st issues with no further issued printing information.
- This edition is generally known as the 'First Trade Edition’ of 1936. Irma Rombauer, recently widowed, (her husband committed suicide) sunk half of her inheritance of $6000.oo into a self-published run of 3000 copies of the 1931 ‘family edition’ of the Joy of Cooking and gave them out to family, friends and acquaintances. Published by A.C. Clayton of St Louis (a company which had never published a book before but printed labels for fancy St Louis shoe companies and for Listerine). Eventually all 3000 copies were given away or sold. Encouraged by the response, Irma Rombauer, on May 1st, 1936, published the first ‘trade edition’ of the Joy of Cooking with Bobbs-Merrill Company - Indianapolis and New York. The larger 1936 edition contained 628 pages and copies published were: 1st printing - 10,000 of which a respectable 6,838 copies sold in the first 6 months. 2nd printing of 1938 – 10,000. 3rd printing of 1939 – 10,000. 4th printing of 1940 – 10,000. 5th printing of 1941 – 10,000. 6th printing of 1941 – 10,000. Between 1936 and the end of 1942 -- 52,151 copies of the first trade edition were sold. The 2nd edition of June 7th 1943 had an increased 884 pages and 167,261 copies were sold. The first trade edition pioneered a new recipe format: first a chronological listing of ingredients and then instruction for preparation, what we now know as 'action format'. Unfortunately, Irma signed a contract which assigned the copyright of both the 1931 and 1936 editions to Bobbs-Merrill, a situation that would in the years to come, badly strain both parties. Anne Mendelson author of 'Stand Facing the Stove' informs; The editions that mark genuine stages of the book's developement are eight in number: the original privately published 'Joy of Cooking' [1931], this Bobbs-Merrill edition [1936] the best-selling wartime edition [1943], the first postwar edition [1946], (actually printed from the 1943 plates with a very few changes), the first Rombauer-Becker edition [1951], the unauthorised edition [1962], the first authorised edition prepared by Irma's daughter, Marion (Rombauer) Becker [1963], and Marion's last revision [1975].

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 10937

Rose.   Giles     - Complete copy of one of the rarest cookery books
A perfect School of INSTRUCTIONS For the Officers of the Mouth:
SHEWING The Whole ART of A Master of the Household, A Master Carver, A Master Butler, A Master Confectioner, A Master Cook, A Master Pastryman. Being a Work of singular Use for Ladies and Gentlewomen, and all Persons whatsoever that are desirous to be acquainted with the most Excellent ARTS of Carving, Cookery, Pastry, Preserving, and Laying a Cloth for Grand Entertainments. The like never before extant in any Language. Adorned with Pictures curiously Ingraven, displaying the whole Arts. By Giles Rose one of the Master Cooks in His Majesties Kitchen. LONDON, Printed for R. Bentley and M. Magnes, in Russel-street in Covent Garden, 1682.
FIRST and SOLE ENGLISH EDITION. 12mo. 2fep. Title Page with single line border. 8pp The Dedication. 10pp To the Reader. 4pp The Contents. 1-563 [1] 2fep. Forty two woodcut illustrations (most of which are full page) in the text. Internally very clean with no browning or foxing. Contemporary dark brown calf with double blind-fillet around the sides. Red morocco label with gilt lettering. Raised bands and overall, a nice patina. In it's original complete state; an exceptional rarity.
- The rare English edition of 'L'Ecole Parfaite des Officers de Bouche' first edition - 1662. One of the most important and popular titles of 17th century French Gastronomy. This English edition comprises of the six original books, (and not five as is sometimes supposed) 'Le Maistre de Hostel; or, Steward of a Family; 'Le grand Escuyer tranchant; or, The Great Master Carver; 'Le Sommelier Royal; or, The Royal Butler; 'Le Confiturier Royal; or, The Royal Confectioner; 'Le Cuisinier Royal; or, The Royal French Master Cook; and 'Le Pastissier Royal; or, The Royal Pastry Cook'. Including numerous, remarkable and primitive woodcuts depict table settings and various carving methods, including more than fifty ways of carving fruit. An interesting aside is that the engraved plates mirror (especially the fruit carvings) the very rare treatise on the art of carving by Jacques Vontet's - 'L'art de Trancher la Viande et Toutes Sortes des Fruits' [circa Lyon 1647]. Oxford states "It seems an excellent book, although it contains some strange things: 'Wine for the Gods', 'Sauce d'Enfer', 'Sheeps Feet for an Afternoon drinking" There are directions for folding napkins. There are dozens of ways of cooking eggs -- 'Eggs a l'Intrigue', 'Eggs a la Negligence', etc - and dozens of different pies and tarts, including 'a tart of frogs', 'a tart made with tortoise' and Sausages made from the Brain of a Capon'. Simon Gough states with insight in one of his wonderfully eccentric catalogues 'Food for Thought' -- "it is curious how few great collections of cookery books contain this volume". By way of an answer, he further proclaims, -- "It is one of the rarest cookery books in the English language" In past years at auction, there are no copies in any of the great cookery book collections of Schraemli, Westbury, Simon, Lambert, Crahan, Wretman, Marks. There was an incomplete copy from Simon Hall's collection, sold at the Dominic Winter Book Auctions in 2005. In the 80's Simon Gough had the complete 'Lister' copy for sale in his 47th catalogue. The Lister copy came up again at auction in the Cetus Library sale at Bloomsbury Books on Sept. 22nd 2011, proving just how very few there are in circulation. No more than three recorded; with one of them incomplete. OCLC indicates eight copies only; Bitting p. 407; Cagle 970; Wing R1933.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10959

Royal Menu       - From Osborne House.
Her Majesty Queen Victoria's Dinner
Dated Monday August 29th, 1900.
225 x 140mm. Thick cardboard. Handwritten in ink in a neat script. The menu and the border are very bright. The edges are rubbed and slightly spotted and browned. Overall slightly age browned. Housed in a marbled cardboard folder with a label on the front cover. Overall a very nice item of very rare Royal ephemera. Queen Victoria died on January 21st 1901. Her Majesty had this dinner 5 months before.
- Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight. The house and its 800 hectare estate was bought from Lady Isabella Blachford in 1845, demolished, and a new house built by 1851 as a summer retreat for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Prince Albert designed the house himself in the style of an Italian Renaissance palazzo. The builder was Thomas Cubitt, the London architect and builder whose company built the main façade of Buckingham Palace for the royal couple in 1847. At Osborne an earlier smaller house on the site was demolished to make way for the new and far larger house. Queen Victoria died at Osborne House in January of 1901. Following her death, the house became surplus to royal requirements and was given to the state with a few rooms retained as a private royal museum dedicated to Queen Victoria. From 1903 until 1921 it was used as a junior officer training college for the Royal Navy known as the Royal Naval College, Osborne. Today it is fully open to the public. The house consisted of the original square wing known as 'The Pavilion', which contained the principal and royal apartments. The apartments contain reminders of Victoria's dynastic links with the other European royal families. The Billiard Room houses a massive porcelain vase, which was a gift of the Russian Tsar. The grandeur of the Billiard Room, the Queen's Dining Room and the Drawing Room on the ground floor forms a marked contrast with the much more homely and unassuming decor of the royal apartments on the first floor. These rooms contain the Prince's Dressing Room, the Queen's Sitting Room, the Queen's Bedroom and the children's nurseries, which were intended for private domestic use, and were therefore arranged to be as comfortable as possible. Both Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were determined to bring up their children in as natural and loving environment as their situation allowed so that as a consequence the royal children visited their parents' bedrooms when other children of a similar status lived in a far more detached manner. The 'main wing', containing the household accommodation, council and audience chambers were added later. The final addition to the house was a wing built between 1890 and 1891. It contains on the ground floor the famous Durbar Room which is named after an anglicised version of the Hindi word darbar. This word means court. The Durbar Room was built for state functions and decorated by Bhai Ram Singh in an elaborate and intricate style, with a carpet from Agra. It now contains the gifts Queen Victoria received on her Golden and Diamond Jubilees. These include engraved silver and copper vases, Indian armour and even a model of an Indian palace. The Indian associations of Osborne House also include a collection of paintings of Indian persons and scenes, painted at Queen Victoria's request by Rudolf Swoboda. There are both depictions of Indians resident or visiting Britain in the 19th Century and scenes painted in India itself when the painter went there for the purpose. The first floor of the new wing was for the sole use of Princess Beatrice and her family. Beatrice was the Queen's youngest daughter, who remained permanently at her side. The royal family stayed at Osborne for lengthy periods each year: in the spring for Victoria's birthday in May; in July and August when they celebrated Albert's birthday; and just before Christmas. In a break from the past, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert allowed photographers and painters to capture their family in the grounds and in the house, partly for their own enjoyment and partly as a form of propaganda for the nation to show what a happy and devoted family they were. Many thousands of prints of the royal family were sold to the public which led Victoria to remark, "no Sovereign was ever more loved than I am, I am bold enough to say." Writing to her daughter Victoria in 1858 about the gloominess of Windsor Castle, Queen Victoria stated, "I long for our cheerful and un-palace like rooms at Osborne." The domestic idyll at Osborne was not to continue. In December 1861, Prince Albert died at Windsor Castle. During her widowhood, Osborne House continued as one of Queen Victoria's favourite homes. Today, Osborne House is under the care of English Heritage and is open to the public from spring through to autumn. The former Naval College's cricket pavilion was converted into a holiday cottage in 2004 and can be booked by members of the public. Guests staying at the cottage are given the right to use the Osborne Estate private beach. Photographs 4 and 5 below show Osborne House as it is today. Photograph number 6 is a print of a painting in 1870 by Sir Edwin Landseer, of Queen Victoria and John Brown at Osborne. In it the Queen sits grandly on her horse while perusing state documents. On the ground are discarded documents and the Queen's gloves beside the red dispatch box. John Brown deigns not to pick them up, instead he rigidly guards the Queen's security and safety by not letting go of the horses reins. By the horse we see an amusing vignette of a small black scotch terrier on hind legs with paws together in a frozen pose of absolute devotion. The elaborate and decorous menu on offer here also gives a glimpse of the ultimate privilege of Victoria's household.

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Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11141

Royal Menu.      
Luncheon for Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.
CORPORATION OF LONDON LUNCHEON AT GUILDHALL to HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN and HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH Upon Their return from Their Tour of Commonwealth and other Countries FRIDAY, 10th MARCH, 1961 The Right Honourable the Lord Mayor SIR BERNARD NATHANIEL WALEY-COHEN. COLONEL RICHARD HOME STUDHOLME, O.B.E., M.A., Alderman. ADAM KENNEDY KIRK Sheriffs. WALTER BASIL HOLDEN Chairman of the Special Reception Committee.
285x210mm. A highly decorated menu in hard cardboard with folded outer cover and 2 folded sheets inside making 4 leaves and eight pages. Top cover. [1] Title page. 1p Guildhall history. 1p Music Programme by the Royal Marine Orchestra. 1p Menu and Wines. 1p Toasts. 2p Names of the Special Reception Committee. 1p Explanation of the cover design. [1] Back cover plain. Inside are 2 folded sheets with Coats of Arms and the precise ceremonial arrangements for the day. All sheets held together with a red and white decorative cord. Housed in a neat marbled cardboard folder with a label on the front cover. A very clean, handsome item of Royal ephemera.
- The Queen and Prince Philip had just visited India, Pakistan, Nepal and Iran. The very colourful water-coloured front cover of the menu depicts impressions of the Commonwealth tour just undertaken. At the top are two drawings of Buckingham Palace and London Airport, depicting points of departure for the tour. In the left panel is the 238 foot Qutab Minar, Delhi, one of the highest stone towers in the world. This is followed at the bottom left, by the Taj Mahal at Agra. On the bottom right we find an impression of Mount Everest in Nepal. In the lower portion of the right panel an image of an Iranian mosque with beautiful Minarets. Lastly above this, two vignettes of Pakistan; Frere Hall, Karachi and the Harbour. On page 2 an essay on the interesting history of the Guildhall. We learn that the Hall and its environs have been consecrated to civic government for more that 1000 years. Two major fires in 1666 and 1941 enveloped the hall. The crypt, porch and mediaeval walls are still original, emerging from the flames without irreparable damage. Each year the Mayor and Sheriffs are elected by the Liverymen after meeting in the Common Hall. In the UK, the Guildhall is one of the most important places of high ceremony. It hosts many important banquets to the Sovereign and Members of the Royal Family, Prime Ministers, Ministers of State and Foreign Leaders. A very interesting document as well as being a menu.

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Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11142

Royal Menus.      
Four Royal Menus from various Royal Palaces.
1 -- Windsor Castle. 23rd January and 20th June. 1908. 2 -- Buckingham Palace. Friday. November 26th 1982. 3 -- Barmoral Castle. 1st September. 1912.
1 -- Two clean but slightly age browned (one a little more than the other) menu cards, edged in gilt with the crest of Edward VII. One is printed and the other is in very small neat hand writing, both in French. 2 -- Very clean menu card, edged in gilt with the crest of Queen Elizabeth. A simple menu printed in French. 3 -- Clean but slightly age browned menu card, edged in gilt with the crest of George V. A simple menu written by hand in light blue ink, and in French. All housed in a cardboard, marbled folder with a label on the front cover.
- Looking at these menus, one is immediately struck by; A - The are all written in French including the dates. B - They are all in the same format and size. Considering they span nearly 80 years, it is amazing. This gives a singular impression that things do not change in the Royal Households. Still keeping a tradition of writing their daily menus in French and not English, especially since modern British cookery has developed its own repertoire to such a high level and British chefs now compare with the best France has to offer. Quite rare and interesting items of Royal ephemera spanning two Royal Castles, a Palace and three Monarchs.

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Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 10994