Montagné.   Prosper     A handsome copy in the original state.
Larousse Gastronomique
Paris, France, Librairie Larousse, 1938
FIRST EDITON. 4to. Patterned paste-downs and endpapers. Preface by A. Escoffier and Ph. Gilbert. 1850 engravings and 16 full page plates in colour. French text. Black and white photos & illustrations throughout. Contents very clean and bright with very little sign of use. Original embossed and decorated cloth boards and spine. Gilt lettering is bright and clean. A wonderful copy.
- Alongside Georges-Auguste Escoffier's ‘Le Guide Culinaire’ and Louis Saulnier's ‘Le Répertoire de la Cuisine’, the Larousse Gastronomique became one of the key reference works on French national and regional cuisine for the professional chef. It is a reference text that codifies a history of the French culinary arts from the distant past to the present day in encyclopedic form. Entries cover such items as culinary terminology, foods, kitchen equipment, techniques, national cuisines, regional French cuisines, and historically significant chefs and restaurants. Philéas Gilbert was a collaborator in the creation of this book and also 'Le Guide Culinaire' with Escoffier, leading to some cross-over with the two books and causing Escoffier to note when he was asked to write the preface that he could “see with my own eyes, and Montagné (a Chef himself) cannot hide from me the fact that he has used 'Le Guide' as a basis for his new book, and certainly used numerous recipes.” Montagné's work signaled a break with the preceding era of French cookery (albeit with a big helping from his collaboration with the true Master; Escoffier) as exemplified by the architectural creations of Marie Antoine Carême. Montagné emphasized dishes that were simple by Carême's standards, and the shortened menus were delivered in the Russian style of service; meals served in courses on individual plates. This philosophy inspired the name of his culinary encyclopedia. Montagné covered the range from the relatively new haute cuisine to French provincial and home cooking with some attention to classic dishes of other nations Three editions of the Larousse gastronomique have been published in English. The first edition was published in 1961. Jennifer Harvey Lang edited the second English edition, published in 1988, from the 1984 French edition compiled and directed by Robert J. Courtine. Courtine's introduction describes the first edition as a monumental work, albeit one in need of some refurbishment. The new editions take into account technical innovations, advancements in food science, and a new culture of dining characterized by simpler meals and a dietary palette expanded through travel and global commerce. Yet the core achievements of Montagné including his recipes and technical advice on classical and regional French dishes are preserved. For the third English edition, published in 2001, Jennifer Harvey Lang worked from a new French edition edited by Joël Robuchon, the president of the Gastronomy committee of the Librairie Larousse. This edition claims to have retained the classic dishes and techniques of the original edition with a new found sensitivity to global influences in technique, presentation, ingredients, and recipes. It is 1,350 pages, over 150 pages longer than the preceding English edition and it includes two hundred new recipes and four hundred new entries. The Larousse Gastronomique no longer sits alone —- if it ever did. It does not provide the detail of the more narrow but specialized cookbooks. Nevertheless, it covers an immense breadth of culinary material, justifying its continued importance as a great volume of reference of French gastronomic tradition.

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Modern category
ref number: 11020

Moxon   Elizabeth     - A rare unrecorded and possibly spurious imprint.
ENGLISH HOUSEWIFERY,
Title page 1. -- EXEMPLIFIED IN ABOVE FOUR HUNDRED AND Fifty RECEIPTS, Giving Directions in most Parts of COOKERY; And how to prepare various SORTS of SOups, Made-dishes, Pasties, Pickles, Cakes, Creams, Jellies, Made-wines, &c.&c.&c. WITH CUTS for the orderly placing the DISHES and COURSES; also BILLS of FARE for every Month in the Year; and an alphabetical INDEX to the Whole. A book necessary for Mistresses of Fa-milies, higher and lower Women Servants, and confined to Things Useful, Substantial, and Splendid, and calculated for the Preserv-ation of Health, and upon the Measures of Frugality, being the result of Thirty Years Prectice and Experience. By Elizabeth Moxon. WITH AN APPENDIX. Containing upwards of EIGHTY RECEIPTS, of the most valua-ble Kind, (many never before printed) communicated to the Publisher by several Gentlewoman in the Neighbourhood, dis-tinguished by their extraordinary Skill in Housewifery --- To this Ediion is now added, an INTRODUCTION, giving an Ac-count of the Times when RIVER FISH are in Season; and a TABLE, shewing at one View the proper Seasons for Sea Fish. FOURTEENTH EDITION, Corrected. LONDON: PUBLISHED FOR THE BOOKSELLERS; AND PRINTED AND SOLD BY H. AND G MOZELY, MARKET-PLACE GAINSBROUGH. 1800. ---Title page 2.[Supplement] English Housewifery Improved OR, A SUPPLEMENT TO MOXON's COOKERY CONTAINING Upwards of Sixty Modern and Valuable RECEIPTS, In Pastry, Preserving, Made Dishes, Made Wines, &c. Collected by a Person of Judgement. WITH CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. THE SEVENTH EDITION. London: PUBLISHED FOR THE BOOKSELLERS; AND PRINTED AND SOLD BY H. AND G MOZELY, MARKET-PLACE GAINSBROUGH. 1800.
12mo. 3feps. Title page. [1] iii Preface. (1)v-vii Introduction. (1) One plate of fish seasons. (1)10-172. Title page of the Supplement. 2-32. 8pp Bills of Fare. Six pages of engraved plates of Table settings with two folding. 6pp Index. 4feps. Half modern dark brown calf with marbled boards and calf corners. Internally all pages evenly browned throughout. Pages 13-14 and 23-24 are present but mis-bound. Half of page 13-14 is missing.
- This imprint not found in any bibliographies. Bitting, p334 cites a 14th edition with no date. Oxford p78, cites the same 'suspicious' 14th with no date, by 'Elizabeth Moxon and Others' Printed and sold by Andrew Hambleton. MacLean p106, also cites Oxford's 14th and with the printers as Andrew Hambleton and H. and G. Mozely but dated 1800. Craig p642, confusingly cites 13th (on the Title page) but states it is really a 15th and a Mozely imprint of 1789. His next imprint is also a Mozely; a new edition of 1808. This copy is another 1800 imprint; to only be printed and sold by Mozely. That makes three copies of the 1800 edition, with two in the bibliographies and this one unrecorded.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11058

Moxon.   Elizabeth     - With an intriguing bookplate
English Housewifery
EXEMPLIFIED In above Four Hundred AND Fifty RECEIPTS, Giving Directions in most Parts of COOKERY; And how to prepare various SORTS of SOOPS, MADE-DISHES, PASTES, PICKLES, CAKES, CREAMS, JELLIES, MADE-WINES, etc. With CUTS for the orderly placing the Dishes and Courses; also Bills of Fare for every Month in the year; and an alphabetical INDEX to the Whole. A book necessary for Mistresses of Families, higher and lower Women Servants, and confined to Things Useful, Substantial, and Splendid, and calculated for the Preservation of Health, and upon the Measures of Frugality, being the result of Thirty Years Practice and Experience. By ELIZABETH MOXON. With an APPENDIX. Containing upwards of Seventy Receipts, of the most valuable Kind, (many never before printed) communicated to the Pub-lisher by several Gentlewoman in the Neighbourhood, distin-guished by their extraordinary Skill in Housewifery. To this Edition is now added, an INTRODUCTION, giving an Account of the Times when River Fish are in Season; and a Table, shewing at one View the proper Seasons for Sea Fish. The ELEVENTH EDITION, Corrected. LEEDS: Printed by GRIFFITH WRIGHT, For GEORGE COPPERWAITE, Bookseller in Leeds; and sold by Mr. E. Johnson, Bookseller in Ave-Mary-Lane, London; and by most Booksellers in Great Britian. 1775. ---- [with a SUPPLEMENT TO MOXON's COOKERY CONTAINING Upwards of Sixty Modern and Valuable RECEIPTS ----- The FOURTH EDITION. M,DCC,LXXV.]
12mo. Title page. iii-iv Preface. v-viii Introduction. ix-x Folding table of fish in season. 5-203. The Supplement. 2-33. 7pp. Bills of Fare. 8pp. Table settings. [2 folding] 8pp. Index. 2feps. The Title page lightly age browned. Text very lightly age browned. Table settings quite browned in places. Full contemporary dark brown calf. Relaid spine with raised bands and black label with gilt lettering. The boards have also been relaid but have a nice old patina. Overall an pleasing copy of a very scarce old book.
- This copy has an interesting bookplate, showing a coat-of-arms and the name W. Moxon. It has obviously been tipped in to the paste-down since the original binding. View a jpeg of the bookplate below, and I would appreciate anyone throwing some light on this intrigue.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10971

Mrs Nourse.       An early Edinburgh cookery school. Rare.
MODERN PRACTICAL COOKERY,
PASTRY, CONFECTIONARY, PICKLING AND PRESERVING. (two small double lines) By MRS NOURSE, TEACHER OF THESE ARTS, EDINBURGH. (two small double lines) ILLUSTRATED WITH COPPERPLATES. FOURTH EDITION IMPROVED AND ENLARGED. (two small double lines) EDINBURGH printed by Michael Anderson. SOLD BY THE AUTHOR, 6, GEORGE STREET; MACREDIE SKELLY & CO; 34, PRINCESS STREET; BRASH & CO. GLASGOW; GEORGE COWIE & CO. LONDON; J. CUMMING, DUBLIN; AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS. (one small line) 1821
Small octavo. 179 x 108 x 14mm. 2feps. [1] Frontis of trussing. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface to the 2nd edition. (1)Advertisement to the 3rd Edition. (1)Advertisement to the 4th edition. (1)viii - xxiv Contents. (1)2 - 335. 3 plates of An Elegant Dinner with approx a sixth missing. 2feps. Internally a little smudged and age dusted. With a quarter brown calf and marbled boards and brown calf tips. The spine with raised bands, gilt tooling and lettering.
- In a fine article online by Eleanor Harris of the Episcopal Congregation of Charlotte Chapel website, she has written a quite detailed article about Mrs Nourse. She was born Elizabeth Burn to Walter Burn, a gardener in Hawick and Janet Ker. Her birth date not found. She married her husband John Nourse on November 18th, 1793 at Hawick. They had four children in quick succession from 1794,95,96 and 1797. Mrs Nourse practised her trade as a pastry-cook and confectioner in partnership with her husband until his death circa 1805. She then became proprietor of a New Town, Edinburgh pastry school. Due to encouragement from Pupils, Customers and friends, and to finance the publication she cannily opened a subscription book at her shop on 38 Princess St, to which a large number subscribed, and in 1809 she self-published the 1st edition of Modern Practical Cookery. In Eleanor Harris's article an unusual snippet records that in 1811 she was living in George St, in a house with 15 windows and a rent of £70 and received allowances for her children. Modern Practical Cookery was popular and reached its 3rd edition on 1813, with this improved and enlarged 4th edition of 1821. Another addition appeared in 1832. It also achieved wide commercial publication and distribution by William Blackwoods, and widely advertised and sold at Cadell's in the Strand, London. A Belfast edition also appeared around this time. It is not clear when she passed away but in1845 an edition was published by Armour and Ramsey of Montreal, Canada. This assured Mrs Norse posthumous fame, her curried chicken and rice soup appearing at heritage events at the Campbell House Museum, Toronto and the Culinary-Tourism Symposium. In writing this condensed version of Eleanor Harris's article I'm struck by Mrs Nourse's industriousness. She is of the same mould as other women cooks who also became cookery book writers like Hannah Glasse, Mary Kettilby, Eliza Smith, Mary Eales, Agnes Marshall, Elizabeth Moxon, Elizabeth Raffald et al, who extended themselves, because of sheer necessity, from the hot demanding kitchens to publishing. Full lives indeed, to our benefit. Oxford also had a 4th Ed. dated 1820. He states that Blackwoods published an edition in 1838, but could not trace any earlier editions. I have not seen any copies at auction going back to 1926. One must assume rarity.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11260

Murray.   Ross     - rare recipes for Swan.
THE MODERN HOUSEHOLDER:
A MANUAL OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. COMPILED AND EDITED BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. With original Illustrations Printed in Colours by Tronheim. AND NUMEROUS WOODCUTS. (A round printer’s device for Warne and Co.) LONDON: FREDERICK WARNE AND CO. BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN. NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND ARMSTRONG.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION - 1st ISSUE. Thick 8vo. 194 x 135 mm. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece of Potatoes. 1 tissue-guard. Title page. [1] (1)vi Preface. (1)viii Contents. (1)x List of Coloured Plates. (1)x List of Woodcuts. (1)2-689. (1)691-722 Index. 2p Advertisements. 1fep. 19 Coloured plates. Many In-text woodcut Illustrations. Very clean internally. Modern ¼ leather binding with marbled boards. Flat spine with gilt lines and text. In very good condition.
- Interestingly, there are 2 exact same copies of this book except for the frontispieces. They are different in both copies. One has as a frontis of the colour plate that faces page 54, featuring various flower ornamentations. This copy has the frontispiece, illustrating the various types of potatoes. This was published first, and one suspects, that because the publishers did not issue a large print run, and due to higher demand, they inserted the other forntis for the second issue. The book format is similar to Beeton’s great household management book, especially with the fine colour plates and in-text b/w woodcut illustrations. In many ways it also as interesting as Beeton’s but quite different in content. An example is Ross Murray’s recipes on pages 338/9 for roasting and making gravy from Swan. As can be seen online, there are many articles on the cooking of Swans, with some of the information edited and reproduced here: Due to the law since the 12th century, all swans at liberty on open waters belong to the Crown by prerogative right, and are the property of the Crown. Mute swans (the common Eurasian swan we see in UK, having the familiar white plumage and an orange-red bill with a black knob at the base) also have statutory protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act. By 1378 the office of 'Keeper of the King's Swans' was in existence and a document exists, entitled, "The Lawes, Orders and Customs for Swans", dating to 1482/3. From a gastronomic viewpoint, mature swans have little subcutaneous fat and their flesh is exceedingly dry, making them a tough and entirely unsuitable subject for barbecuing. This is what Ross Murray writes; “The cygnets when all hatched are of a slate-grey, which grows lighter as they grow older. The cygnets of the wild swan are white. But it is of the grey cygnets we have to speak. They are hatched in June. If they are intended for the kitchen, they are put into a separate swan pond at the end of August or the first week in September. After they have been "hopped or upped", as it is called, from their native place, grass is thrown to them twice a day with their other food for a fortnight. They are fattened on barley: a coomb (4 bushels) for each cygnet suffices for the fattening. Cygnets can only be fattened before the white feathers appear; after that no further feeding will do any good. As soon as a white feather shows they will cease fattening, no matter what food they have. They can consequently only be eaten in December, and they are a capital and magnificent Christmas dish. Their weight then will be from 25 lbs to 28 lbs.” They were slaughtered the moment their white adult plumage appeared, which pretty well coincided with Christmas. They were seven months old and very obese. Murray goes on to tell us that swan was a popular local dish in Norfolk and explains how they were roasted in homes in that county on a spit in front of the fire as a Christmas dish. He explains that the finished swan was garnished with four little swans carved out of turnips and 'a paper frill, nicely cut, about the shoulders. Other famous Chefs have recipes for swan in their cookery books. Published by the 17th century master cook Robert May, in his famous tome entitled; ‘The Accomplisht Cook’, (item # 10965 on this site) he gives recipes for 'A Swan roast' and 'A Swan Pye'. Nearly a hundred years after May published the bill of fare above, another Christmas dinner featuring a swan pie, this time as a centrepiece for the first course appeared in John Thacker's The Art of Cookery (Newcastle upon Tyne: 1758). Thacker was the cook to the Dean and Chapter at Durham Cathedral where there had been a swannery since well before the Reformation. Edward Kidder also published in his beautiful cookery book (see item # 10966 on this site), a small recipe for Swan Pye on page 6.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11243

Murrell.   John     - Rare early edition.
Mvrrels Tvvo Books of Cookerie and Carving.
1st TITLE PAGE: (a straight line) The fifth time printed with Additions. (a straight line) LONDON, Printed by M.F. for John Mar-riot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet-street. 1638. The text surrounding by a double line border. 2nd TITLE PAGE: THE SECOND BOOKE OF COOKERIE. (a straight line) VVherein is set forth the newest and most commendable Fashion of Dressing, Boyling, Sowcing, or Roast-ing, all manner either Fleash, Fish, or any kinde of Fowle. (a straight line) Together with an exact order of ma-king Kickshawes, or made-dishes, of any fashion, fit to beautifie either Noble-mans or Gentle-mans Table. (a straight line) All set forth according to the new English or French fashion. BY JOHN MURRELL. (a straight line) The fifth Impression. (a straight line) LONDON, Printed for John Marriot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dun-stans Church-yard. 1638. THE THIRD TITLE PAGE: A NEVV BOOKE OF CARVING AND SEVVING. (a straight line) A small printers device. (a straight line) LONDON. Printed by M.F. for John Marriot, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Churchyard in Fleetstreet. 1638.
8vo. 1 fep with ink inscription –“Mary Freeman her Book 1715” on front free end-paper, the same, but dated “1733” on verso. 3 Title pages. First title within double rule border. [1] 2nd x 1st title page [1]. 2 pages The Epistle Dedicatorie. 1-82. 2nd Title Page [1]. 85-148. 3rd Title Page [1]. 151-188. 13 pages of Tables [1]. 1 fep. Text in black letter script with woodcuts and typographical head-pieces and ornaments in-text. Front and back covers with no paste-downs. Showing original leather edging. Light age yellowing, margins of title page fractionally dusty, small section torn away from blank lower margin of M4 with loss of signature letter, minuscule wormhole in upper margin, occasional marginal thumb mark. Crisp and clean in contemporary dark brown calf, covers bordered with triple blind rule, ink stain to upper cover, spine ends worn. A very good unsophisticated copy.
- This fifth edition is probably the original second edition with new editions of this hugely important and fascinating cookery book. One of only a handful of surviving copies of any of the early editions, and one of the first cookbooks to establish cookery as a fashion, rather than simply a practical guide to running a kitchen/household. The work is divided into three parts, each with its own title page, the first two on new recipes for cooking, and the third “a New Booke of Carving and Sewing”(The medieval translation for sewing is serving). The prefaces, and its dedications, are to Mrs Martha Hayes in the first book and to Lady Browne in the second. The Author disparages previous cookery books “the most of which nevertheless have instructed rather how to marre than to make good Meate”. Murrell’s work was new, in that it established a new spirit of cookery and promises it is set forth in the English and French Fashion . He openly appeals to “London Cookery” rather than to provincial cookery. Murrell included many recipes he brought back from his experience of the new cuisine emerging in France. Unfortunately, the complete absence of any new French cookery books between 1560 and 1650 leaves a gap in our knowledge of the pre-La Varenne phase of development. In the third part of his book, Murrell also re-published sections of the first printed carving manual in English, “The Boke of Kervyne” of 1513. Though he reclaims carving as a task suitable for wives in aspiring ‘gentle’ households, he groups it with what he declares to be the most current and chic methods of cooking. In some ways Murrell’s use of this older carving manual seems a nostalgic throwback to an older style of hospitality, which he compares both negatively and positively to the new French methods. Despite its disdain for tradition, Murrell’s work includes many of the classics of British and French cooking recognizable today, including such things as rice pudding (though his recipe calls for the inclusion of ‘the smallest guts of a hog’). It also includes recipes using new world produce such as Turkey. Murrell's 'Book of Cookerie' is particularly rare in any edition; Only a handful of copies are known. STC 18303 recording only 3 copies in the UK and Folger and Library of Congress in the US. The first edition is known only by a sub-title at the Bodlein and the New York Public Library copy. No other edition is recorded. Bitting 336. Hull, ‘Chaste, Silent and Obedient.’ pp. 43-4, 187-88. Not in Vicaire, Oberle, or Alden.L1353. Scarce indeed!

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11236

Napier.   Alexander    
A Noble Boke Off Cookry
FFOR A PRYNCE HOUSSOLDE OR ENY OTHER ESTATELY HOUSSOLDE. REPRINTED VERBATIM FROM A RARE MS. IN THE HOLKHAM COLLECTION EDITED BY MRS. ALEXANDER NAPIER. LONDON: ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. 1882.
4to. Half title. Title Page. (v-xiii) (1-136) 3fep. Nicely bound in half tan calf with marbled boards. Plain spine with red label with gilt lines and lettering. Excellent condition externally and internally with minimal staining. Printed on large paper with wide margins and uncut edges. There is a very light round red library stamp (about the size of a 5p piece) on the Title page, but not affecting the text.
- This very nice book is transcribed from a manuscript in the Holkham Collection and is dated; circa 1467. Those recipes, in turn, closely resemble recipes in another famous cookery manuscript called the 'Forme of Cury' compiled about 1390. There is also on p.3. a printing of an aquatint engraving of the 'Peacock Feast' On Nov. 8th 1791, a bookseller was sued by the engraver of the 'Peacock Feast' for pirating the plate without permission. That aquatint plate was used to embellish a book called 'Antiquitates Culinaria' also about very old cookery manuscripts recording ancient Kingly Feasts. The original etching was done from a representation of a Saxon Feast on an ancient brass in St Margaret's Church, King's Lyn. It is also nice to find it as a head-piece, on p3. of this copy. On p.134, this book has an interesting glossary of obsolete medieval culinary words to be found in the 'Noble Boke of Cookery. A fascinating glimpse of English gastronomic history.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10925

NEWHAM-DAVIS.   LIEUT.-COL.     - A gastronomic tour of London 1914.
THE GOURMET'S GUIDE.
TO LONDON. BY LIEUT.-COL. NEWHAM-DAVIS. Author of 'The Gourmet's Guide to Europe" (small printer's device). LONDON GRANT RICHARDS LTD. PUBLISHERS
FIRST EDITION: 1914. 165 X 110 mm. 1fep. Half-title. Verso has frontis. Tissue guard then Title page. [1] 1p. Aphorism of Brillat Savarin. [1] 1p TO ALL GOOD GOURMETS. [1] ix - x Preface. xi - xiv Contents. xv List of four illustrations. [1] 1 - 386. 2feps. The text block very clean. Bound in a maroon cloth with gilt text on spine and front cover with bright gilt cartoon figure of a Maitre de Hotel. The whole book in excellent condition.
- Newham-Davis was an avid gastronome who checked out and dined at a huge number of London's eateries, hotels and restaurants. This was the time when Escoffier was ensconced at the Carlton Hotel on the corner of Haymarket and Pall Mall. One of the four illustrations in the book is a famous photograph of Escoffier, (see image #3 below) with a signed dedication to Newham-Davis [N-D]. One of the questions N-D was frequently asked is where is the best place in London to dine. He further states that he always replies with another question; "whom are you going to take out to dinner, because there are so many 'best places', If a man answers that he wishes to entertain some bachelors of his own ripe age and taste, where the food is excellent, the rooms comfortable and no band to interfere with conversation, then the diagnosis is a Cafe Royal one. Very astute. For a City Banquet he recommends on page 308 the Mercers Hall as most of his forbears had been of that guild. He explains in the beginning that he drank 1884 Pommery at one banquet and that his great-great-uncle who was Lord Mayor and Grandfather who was a very peppery and litigious old gentleman. His great uncle was in turn once the Master of the Company. On page 313 N-D goes to introduce himself the famous Mrs Rosa Lewis. She was known as the 'Queen of Cooks and the proprietress of the Cavendish Hotel that occupied three houses, 81 to 83 Jermyn St. He is given a shock on meeting Mrs Lewis. Due to his assumption that his family cook, whom he describes as a portly lady given to wearing church-going attire, he gets a huge shock on meeting Rosa Lewis. His vague ideas are shattered and sent spinning when a slim, graceful lady with a pretty oval face and charming eyes with hair just touched with grey. (see image #5 below). Her culinary skills were highly prized by Edward V11 with whom she was also rumoured to have had an affair. She tells N-D that her whole kitchen brigade consists of girls, believing that having accomplished woman cooks in the kitchen was far more preferable than having male chefs. She also tells of a dish of Quail pudding that is a big favourite of the KIng. N-D finally explains to Mrs Lewis that he considers she holds an equal and parallel position in the kitchen to that of the great French Maitre-Chef, Escoffier. Rosa replied that she admired him not only as a great cook but also as a great gentleman. This is an absorbing book of abundant factual detail, written very well by Lieut- Col Newham-Davis. He appears too be very well connected and a fascinating diligent net-worker. There is a slight gossipy edge to his observations that hold the attention admirably.

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Modern category
ref number: 11288

Nignon   Edouard     - A special limited 2nd edition - #1445 of 2105.
Les Plaisirs de la Table
Ou, sous une forme nouvelle, l'Auteur a devoile maints delicieux secrets et recettes de bonne Cuisine, transcrit les precieux et de fins Gourmets fameux et de fins Gourmets, conseillers aimables et surs en l'Art du Bein Manger PREFACE DE M. ROBERT DE FLERS de l'Academie Francaise (A prinetr's device of a sheep) DESSINS de P.F. GRIGNON. A.PARIS CHEZ L'AUTEUR. 3, Place de la Madeleine et chez LAPINA. EDITEUR. 75, Rue Denfert-Rochereau Overage Depose
4to. Paste-down and fep with brown-on-brown design of food dishes and laid tables. 1fep. Half title. On the verso a breakdown of the print run stylishly designed as a wine glass and dated - April 15th 1930. Title page.[1] Dedication to A. Antonin Careme by Nignon. On verso - red illustration of a table setting. (1)ii-vii Preface by Robert de Flers. 1p Chapitre Premier. [1] 3-330. 331-334 Errata. 335-339 Table des Matieres. 1p Printer's device. 1fep. Last page and paste-down with brown-on-brown design of food dishes and laid tables. Text in black with many very fine red illustrations throughout. The start of each chapter is a full page illustrated design in red. Full original art nouveau style red and black paper cover with gold embossed lines in very good slightly faded condition. The spine has 1.5" chip at the top of the spine and a small chip at the bottom but has been finely repaired. Internally very clean. Edges untrimmed and many uncut.
- This handsome fully original copy of 'Les Plaisirs de la Table' is a true reflection of Nignon as a highly gifted chef who had a reputation for cooking very fine food. In print it is even recorded that at the time when Nignon was the Maitre Chef de Cuisine at Claridges Hotel in London, many in the trade thought him a superior craftsman to Escoffier, who was at the same time, Maitre Chef de Cuisine of The Carlton Hotel in Pall Mall. This copy although slightly larger page-wise than the first edition of 1926, is of a more pleasing design.

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Modern category
ref number: 11143

Nignon.   Edouard     - In fine original condition.
E. NIGNON ELOGES DE LA CUISINE FRANCAISE
PRESENTATION DE SACHA GUITRY (A small illustration of game, fish, casserole and wine bottle) PARIS L'EDITION D'ART H. PIAZZA 19, RUE BONAPARTE. With an elaborate ornate illustrated blue/green border.
FIRST EDITION 1933. 238 x 190mm. 1fep. Half title. [1] Title page. [1] Pages 1&2 Presentation by Sacha Guitry. Dedication page to Robert de Flers. [1] 1page with large illustration in blue/green. [1] 11-426. 427-441- Index Alphabetique. [1]443-444 Index. Many beautiful illustrations thoughout. 1page Ouverges de Meme Auteur. 2feps. Text block in fine clean condition with many pages uncut. Original complete soft covers. The spine is age browned and the covers slightly less so, but everything as originally issued and clearly legible (See image # 1). A wonderful copy.
- While researching Nignon’s book I came across an article written in the Hotelkeeper & Caterer on 4th May 2004 by Michel Roux, the famous chef & proprietor of the Waterside Inn, Bray, Berkshire. It explained the book so well that I have copied the article in its entirety…….. “The cookbook I refer to most is 'Eloges de la Cuisine Française' by Edouard Nignon. It was originally published in 1933, but I found my copy quite by chance 35 years ago in a London bookshop. (It seems to be available only at auction now.) I knew about Nignon, of course - that he was one of our great chefs along with Escoffier and Carême, but I hadn't read anything that he'd written. As soon as I picked the book up and flicked through it I was hooked. I could sense the spirit of the man behind it - a man with a great passion for his career. Food for him was a life, a mission. He not only loved cooking, he loved to eat, too. And as well as being a great chef, he worked front-of-house in his own Paris restaurant, Le Restaurant Larue, in the early 20th century. That struck a chord with me, because when Albert and I first opened Le Gavroche in London we used to take it in turns to put on our evening suits and take the orders at the table. Something that made this book special was the fact that it really was ahead of its time. The way Nignon cooked would be totally acceptable today. His recipes show true respect for his produce, and they are light already - not dependent on cream at all. They rely on skill and the quality and taste of produce. This is why I love the book so much. The book is divided into three parts, with two-thirds being recipe-led and the remaining third being about Nignon's life. The first part is broadly on gastronomy, the second part is on the treasures of the kitchen - flavours, the table, etc - and the third part is written around different dinners that Nignon cooked. All the pages of my book are well-thumbed, and I can say absolutely that elements of many of my dishes have been inspired by the recipes and philosophies in it. Nignon passed on such a wealth of knowledge and wrote in such a passionate and inspirational manner - the beauty of a true master. The book is like a companion to me, because I can see part of myself in the book. It is truly inspirational to me - a work of art. Some of my more senior chefs at the Waterside have read this book, but as it is written in French and it is a very advanced book, it would have very little meaning to young chefs who are at the start of their culinary career, I think. It's one for when you are older.”

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Modern category
ref number: 11195