Anon.       - The great Diet & Health treatise in verse.
Regimen Sanitatis Salerni:
OR THE SCHOOLE OF SALERNES REGEMENT of HEALTH. Containing, Most Learned and judicious Directions and Instructi-ons, for Preservation, Guide, and Government of MANS LIFE. Dedicated, Unto the late High and Mighty King of England, from that University, and published (by consent of learned Physicians) for a generall good. Reviewed, corrected, and enlarged with a Commentary for the more plain and easie understanding thereof. [two lines] By P.H. Dr, in Physicke, deceased. [one line] Whereunto is annexed, A necessary Discourse of all sorts of Fish, in use among us, with their effects appertaining to the Health of Man. As Also, Now, and never before, is added certain precious and approved Ex-periments for Health, by a Right Honourable, and Noble Personage. [one line] London, printed by B. Alsop, dwelling in Grub-Street near the Upper-Pump, 1649.
183 x 142 mm. 1fep. Title page surrounded by a thick floral border. [1] 2p Epistle Dedicatory. (x)2-206 with occasional marginalia in a fine script. 10p The Table. 207-220 Excellent and approved Receipts, 3p The Table of additional Receipts. [1] 1 fep. The whole text block uniformly browned through out. Pages 14-46 with excellent repairs not affecting the text. Original full dark brown calf with blind tooled lines on the spine and a small dark red calf label with gilt lettering. Inside and out this copy looks its age but not objectionable. A desirable copy in the original state.
- The Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum (from Latin: Salerno Rule of Health) is a medieval didactic poem in hexameter verse written as part of the Medical School of Salerno in the XII - XIII century. Although it is commonly dated around that time, some sources argue that it dates back to 1050. The work, probably dedicated to Robert II Duke of Normandy and pretender to the English throne who was in Salerno in 1099 returning from the First Crusade. The text shows signs of the ‘School of Salerno’ for everything about hygiene, food, diet, herbs and their therapeutic properties. The author is unknown, although some attribute it to a certain Giovanni Da Milano (John of Milan), perhaps a disciple of Constantine the African; the text, however, has undergone several contributions over the centuries. It was also translated into almost all European languages, and reached nearly 40 editions before 1501, many of which were added to, or material taken away from the original version. The first English translation was made by Sir John Harington in 1608 . The first printing, containing 364 verses in Latin, was published in 1480, and annotated and edited by Arnold of Villanova; the book was enormously popular and was held in high regard as a textbook for teaching and the dissemination of medicine. It was used for that purpose until the nineteenth century, when an attempt to make a medically accurate translation was made in 1871 by the American doctor John Ordronaux. The Regimen was very popular because the rhyming verses were easy to remember. It was organized by the six ‘non-naturals’. According to Galen, they are: air, food and drink, sleeping and waking, motion and rest, excretions and retentions, and number six, dreams and the passions of the soul. The original content addressed the humors, the complexions (temperaments), and some diseases. It also contains text on phlebotomy, providing information on bloodletting. An interesting read of a far-reaching text and medieval medical classic that can also lie easily along side early cookery classics and treatises. It was not until the late 18th century that medicinal receipts, usually found at the back of most printed cookery books was fazed out.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11224

ANON.       - In the original state.
Domestic Cookery
1st Title page - DOMESTIC COOKERY OR FAMILY RECEIPT BOOK. BY A LADY With a small oblong illustrated Farm scene with a farmer and 2 cows. Under the farm scene is a small sentence - 'Blest are those homes with simple, plenty, crowned'. At the bottom is Derby - THOMAS RICHARDSON & SON. 2nd Title page - THE DOMESTIC COOKERY; A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR HOUSEKEEPERS: TO WHICH IS SUBJOINED, A COLLECTION OF VALUABLE RECEIPTS. BY AN EXPERIENCED COOK AND CONFECTIONER. LONDON: THOMAS RICHARDSON AND SON, 26, PATERNOSTER ROW; 9 CAPEL STREET, DUBLIN: AND DERBY.
130x85mm. 1fep. [1] Provenance on back of frontis in neat script; Mr H. Shulter. Merriot 1827. Frontis-piece with a round illustration of a lady cook holding a big jug in a typical Kitchen scene with a caption underneath – Domestic Cookery. Facing that is an elaborate title page. [1] The 2nd Title page. [1] (1)7-313. p 314-324 Contents. 1fep. No illustrations in-text but nice and clean. The original slightly stained light brown blind stamped cloth cover with Domestic Cookery in gilt on the spine. Internally, tight and bright.
- With gratitude I must thank Uta Schumacher-Voelker for clarifying the bibliographic details of this book. Until she helped me it had been very hard to get any precise information. She informs that this little book has the tendency to fool booksellers and collectors alike, because it closely resembles some of the editions of Mrs. Rundell's New System of Cookery in size and binding-style. Uta then elaborates very precisely that it is the last of four clearly distinguishable editions of the same book. The first edition is actually dated 1847 (Derby: Thomas Richardson and Son) Then follows at least three editions, all undated but with different imprints: #2. Derby: Thomas Richardson and Son, 172 Fleet St., London and 9, Capel St., Dublin [nd]. This imprint was issued before 1857, when the imprint changed to #3. Richardson & Son, 147 Strand; 9, Capel St., Dublin, where, according to records, they had their business only until 1860. #4. My imprint, here with the Paternoster Row address issued between 1861-79, but Uta estimates the date of publishing is closer to 1861 than 1879.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11193

ANON.       - 6 Vols. in 3 Tomes.
DOMESTIC ECONOMY.
THE MAGAZINE OF DOMESTIC ECONIMY. VOLUME THE FIRST - FIFTH. (a single thin straight line) WE ARE BOTRN AT HOME, WE LIVE AT HOME, AND WEE MUST DIE AT HOME, SO THAT THE COMFORT AND ECONOMY OF HOME ARE MORE DEEP AND HEART-FELT, AND PERSONAL INTEREST TO US,THAN THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS OF ALL THE NATIONS OF THE WORLD. (a single thin straight line) LONDON: PUBLISHED BY ORR AND SMITH, PATERNOSTER ROW; AND W. & R. CHAMBERS, EDINBURGH. (a single very small thin straight line) MDCCCCXXXVI.
Three thick Volumes. 220 x 147 x 49 mm. 1st VOL: 1st TOME: 1fep. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)ii - iii Introduction. 4 - 382. (1)384 - 387 Index. 2nd VOL: [1] Half Title. [1] Title Page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 3rd VOL: 2nd TOME: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 4th VOL: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 5th VOL: 3rd TOME: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 6th VOL: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. All fully bound in dark green embossed silk with light brown label. with gilt text and tooling. Overall all volumes slightly age browned with very slight foxing throughout. A fine set.
- If you look at Item Ref: 11279 on this site, you can see the four volumes of Cassell's company produced books about the 'Household' with no authorship attributed. This is also the case when you peruse these three volumes here published by William S. Orr's publishing house. It's obvious both are typical of a Victorian printed genre aimed at a burgeoning middle-class due to the huge ramp-up of the British industrial revolution. The big difference is that these Orr produced volumes are full of all manner of things that the Victorian husband and wife would need, but without illustrations nor colour plates to enrich the production, whereas the Cassell books are heavily illustrated with chromolithograph colour plates and practical black and white vignettes. The Cassell production was a direct response to the famous O.S. Beeton and Ward Lock publishing phenomenon of Isabella Beeton's 'Household Management'. But Beeton's book itself was a direct response to this type of earlier book here. One of the other big differences besides the gaps in years, between all three household books is that Beeton's is attributed to Isabella and not just a company. William S. Orr was a publishers' agent from the 1830s, and was a close associate of Robert and William Chambers, (the other publisher named in these six volumes). He printed a London edition of 'Chambers's Edinburgh Journal' by mid-1832. The arrangement used stereotype plates, and brought the circulation up to 50,000. He published these volumes of 'Household Economy' in 1936. By 1845 the overall circulation was declining from its peak, and Orr wrote to Chambers explaining that the market was changing. In 1846 Chambers terminated the arrangement with Orr. Punch magazine, set up in 1841, brought in Orr to help with distribution to booksellers and news agents. Orr died in 1873. Whatever the publishing merits or not of these books, they are fascinating pragmatic advice for everything needed to be known about the setting up of a comfortable Victorian home.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11280

ANON.      
THE Lady's Companion:
VOLUME 1. CONTAINING Upwards of Three Thousand different Receipts: in every Kind of COOKERY: AND Those the best and most fashionable; BEING Four Times the Quantity of any Book of this Sort. 1. Making near two Hundred different Sorts of Soops, Pottages, Broth, Sauces, Cullies, &c. after the French, Italian, Dutch, and English Way; also making Cake Soop for the Pocket. 11. Dressing Flesh, Fish and Fowl; this last Illustrated with Cuts, shewing how every Fowl is to be truss'd. 111. Directions for making Ragoos and Fricaseys. 1V. Directions for Dressing all Manner of Kitchen Garden Stuff, &c. V. Making two Hundred different Sorts of Puddings, Florendines, Tanzeys, &c. which are four Times the Number to be met (2 long perpendicular lines) with any other Book of this Kind. V1. The whole Art of Pastry, in [n aking - sic] upwards of two Hundred Pies, (with the Shapes of them engraven on Copper-Plates) Tarts, Pasties. Custards, Cheese-Cakes, Yorkshire Muffins, &c. V11. Receipts for all Manner of [Pick ing - sic] Potting, collaring, &c. V111. For Preserving, making Creams, Jellies, and all Manner of Confectionary, with particular Receipts for making Orgeat and Blanc Manger. 1X. Rules amd Directions for setting out [D nners, - sic] Suppers, and grand Entertainments. To which is added, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year. ALSO Directions for Brewing Beers, Ales, &c. making all Sorts of English Wines, Cyder, Mum, Metheglin, Vinegar, Verjuice, Catchup, &c. WITH The receipts of Mrs Stephens for the Stone; Dr. Mead for the Bite of a Mad Dog; the recipe, sent from Ireland, for the Gout; Sir Hans Sloane's Receipt for Sore Eyes; and the receipt for making Tar Water. (1 long horizontal line) The SIXTH EDITION with Large Additions. (1 long horizontal line) VOL.1. (1 long horizontal line) LONDON: Printed for J. HODGES, on London-Bridge; and R. BALDWIN, at the Rose, in Pater-noster Row. 1753. VOLUME 11. is the Fifth Edition. Title page same as previous, except the three typos on the sixth edition are not evident here.
VOLUME 1. 179 x 113mm. 1 new fep. 1 original with inscription - Liz. Booker. Book AD 1757. [1] Frontispiece. Title Page with ink inscription on verso tipped in, with a warning "not to steal this book". (1)2-413. [1] Sixteen pages of Index to the first volume. 1fep. With seven pages of illustrations of trussing. Also nine pages of Bills of Fare. Text block fine. Frontispiece, tittle page somewhat browned and stained with no loss. VOLUME 11. 179 x 115mm. 1 new fep. 1 original fep. Title Page with ink recipe on verso tipped in for 'French Rowles'. (1)2-422. Eight pages of Index to the second volume. 2fep. With eight pages of ornate pie shapes. Text block nice and clean with the title page slightly age browned. Both volumes bound in full dark brown calf with both spines rather sunned. Boards with elaborate blind tooling and edged with thin gilt lines. The spines with raised bands and blind and gilt tooling. With red labels, gilt text and small round breen labels for volume numbers.
- Although the author is unknown and has produced a very large quantity of text, filling two thick volumes, the question arises; why not put a name to what is actually an impressive cookery book.? It is hard to imagine an independent publisher or even a production this size issued by a publishing quango, being profitable. The Title page proclaims boldly, that it is "Four Times the Quantity of any Book of the Sort". With near 200 soups alone, Including The Cook and Housewife's Calendar, or monthly list of things in season from January to December; Proper articles to cover the table every month ; Specimen of a Housekeepers Book with year-end statement; Marketing tables from one penny three farthings to three pence; table of expenses, income and wages from farthings to pounds and back to farthings; The eight pages of plates are impressive, but can also be found (albeit, arranged in a different sequence) in the book of 'Receipts of Pastry and Cookery' of Edward Kidder first published around1720. Whatever the true facts are, it is a very impressive set.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11309

ANON.       A label for an expensive Paris sweet shop. circa 1820.
A LA SOURCE DES DOUCEURS.
POMEREL. G.dre de M. CHEVET. CONFISEUR DISTILLATEUR. de S.A.R. Madame la Duchesse de Berry, Fabrique Dragees et Fruits pour Baptemes, Bonbons, assiettes mentees Corbeilles et Cartonnage pour Fetes et Etrennes; Chocolat de Sante et a la Vanille, Confitures de toutes especes; Pate d' Auvergne; Gelee de Pommes de Rouen; Sirops; Fruits a la Eau-de-vie; Liqueu et Nins de Liqueurs;Envoie en Province et a l'Etranger. a' Paris. RUE MONTESQUIEU, No 5.
160 mm in Dia. Top half is an illustration of children finding many sweets at the bottom of a waterfall. With a picnic table set up a maid for a lady of means. A very beautiful black and white, ornately designed label for a company/shop selling many different sweets. Housed in a marbled card folder.
- By the quality of the illustration on this label it must have been a high-end establishment. A long search online did not enlighten. A unique item. (If anyone can shed any more light on this item, it would be much appreciated).

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Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11313

Anon.       - A rare dinner invitation to the Crown & Anchor Tavern, and the Duke's signature.
77th Anniversary Dinner for the Cumberland Society
ITEM 1. FRIDAY 1ST, MAY, 1812, His Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland in the Chair. Stewards. H.R.H. Prince Ernest Augustus, Duke of Cumberland. The Rt, Mounsey Esqr. Tho. Monkhouse Esqr. Josh. Lowden Esqr. Heny. Oliphant Esqr. Isaac Armstrong Esqr. Stephen Morton Esqr. Wm. Sanderson Esqr. Tho. Mounsey Esq. John Carruthers Esqr. Dinner on Table at 5 o' Clock precisely. Tickets 15/s Each. No. (With an engraving of ULLSWATER from GABBAROW PARK) ITEM 2. The signature of 'Ernest' H.R.H The Duke of Cumberland, cut from the end of an autographed letter. ITEM 3. An original envelope addressed by the King (the Duke of Cumberland became the King of Hanover in 1837) to 'His Grace The Duke of Buckingham and Chandos', signed 'Ernest' on the lower left. Also annotated: King of Hanover, July 28th 1843. The envelope also has the King's black wax seal.
205x156mm. One light cardboard sheet beautifully inscribed with a lovely engraving of Ullswater by Silvester sc. Very lightly age browned but overall in very nice condition. With a manuscript ink inscription price for £10.10.0 at the top right hand corner. Blank on the verso except for an ink inscription; W. Warrington.
- The Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand was a well-known London landmark, as well as being a dining room of repute. The Tavern after it was rebuilt in 1790 had a large meeting/function room that could seat up to two thousand or more. The famous cooks, F. Collingwood and J. Woolams (images 3&4 below), authors of the cookery book 'The Universal Cook' were serving their tenure there at the time of this Cumberland Society dinner. The Tavern had two entrances, one on the Strand and the other on Arundel St. It is referred to in Stow's 'Survey of London and Westminster' of 1720 as boasting associations with Johnson, Boswell and Reynolds. The meeting hall at the Tavern was long associated with radical politics. Sympathisers of the French Revolution gathered there in the 1790s to commemorate the storming of the Bastille. Used as well as headquarters for Francis Burdett and other ardent reformers. It is also recorded that in the year 1799 the Tavern was the No.1 Grand Master’s Lodge, in the correct list of all the Lodges in London of the most ancient and honourable fraternity of free and accepted Masons of England. His Royal Highness Ernest Augustus, The Duke of Cumberland, who presided over this grand 77th Anniversary Dinner of the Cumberland Society was born on 5th June, 1771 and was by birth the 5th, but in survivor-ship the 2nd son of King George 111 and Queen Charlotte. He became King of Hanover on the death of his elder brother, King William the 1V, in 1837. He died in 1851. The Cumberland Society was formed by his Grandfather the Duke of Cumberland. (1721-65) In 1775 his son also the Duke of Cumberland & Strathearn founded the Cumberland Society Fleet for racing on the Thames. This was the precursor to the Royal Thames Yacht Club, formed in 1830 under the patronage King William IV. It is the oldest continually operating yacht club in the UK today. The present Duke whose dinner invitation is on view here, was carrying on the business of a venerable tradition that was the Cumberland Society. Three pertinent rare ephemeral items that have lasted well.

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Information

Ephemera category
ref number: 11053

Anon.      
The Oyster.
WHERE, HOW, AND WHEN TO FIND, BREED, COOK AND EAT IT. (With a woodcut vignette of Oysters) LONDON: TRUBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCLXI.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 12mo. 1fep. [1] Humorous wood-engraved frontispiece of two oysters. Title page. [1] v-viii Contents. 9-96. 1-8 Advertisements. 1fep. Original publishers coloured pictorial boards, very slightly worn but still fresh looking. With a re-laid sympathetic chocolate-brown calf spine with horizontal gilt lettering and lines. Internally very clean. A very nice copy of a very scarce book.
- Cagle p.657 - informs: All the wood engravings, as well as the ones repeated on the covers are by George Cruikshank. There is also an anatomical wood engraving of an oyster on p 30. Halkett and Laing attribute this work to Herbert Byng Hall (1805?-1883) and state that it has been erroneously attributed to Eustace Clare Grenville Murray (1824-1881) BMC enters it under Hall and the NUC under Murray. Axford on p. 312 miss-dates it 1959. Besides it being confusingly assigned to so many contributors it is an uncommon, interesting and scarce book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11018

ANON.       - Extremely scarce to rare; one of only three copies found.
Every Family's Cookery Book
OR, PLAIN AND PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR PROPERLY PREPARING, COOKING, AND SERVING-UP ALL SORTS OF PROVISIONS, COMPRISING MEATS, POULTRY, FISH, GAME. AND VEGETABLE FOOD. ALSO, Soups, Gravies, Sauces, Pies, Puddings, Pastry, Sweet Dishes, Sweetmeats, Cakes, Bread, Wines, Ale, Beer, Porter, Pickles, &c., &c., &c. DIRECTIONS OF CARVING. THE CHOOSING AND BUYING OF FISH, FLESH AND FOWL. BY AN EXPERIENCED COOK. WAKEFIELD: WILLIAM NICHOLSON AND SONS. London: S.D. EWINS &Co., 22, Paternoster Row.
FIRST EDITION. n/d circa 1850-64. 8vo 1fep replaced. Engraved frontispieces and Title page. [1] Title page. [1] 1p Introduction. [1] (1)8-405. (1)407-416 Index. 1fep. 10 plates of Carving, butcher's cuts, fish etc. Numerous engravings in-text. Engraved title pages uniformly browned. Slightly dusty throughout. With the original blind stamped and embossed dark green and blue fine cloth covers and spine with black relief and slightly faded gilt. Overall the text block is fine, albeit in a slightly used condition and with a lovely original cover.
- A cookery book with a difference! In the 'Introduction' we learn the book is the work of an Authoress. It is also very well laid out with very good plates that have obviously had more effort than usual applied to their production. The cover is very nice and unusual in its detail and presentation. Not in Bitting, Cagle, Attar, Oxford, Hazlitt. No copies in the B.L. Copac has 2 copies. One at the Guildhall Lib. London with no date, and another copy in Leeds, also with 416 pages, printed in Halifax dated 1864. This copy printed in Wakefield with same page collation, but with no date. A search of World Libraries provided no results. A probable minimum of 2 editions with this being the first. One assumes extreme scarcity to rarity.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11109

ANON.       - Two instruction manuals, one old and rare; one modern.
ITEM 1. NAPKIN FOLDING: ITEM 2. THE BEAUTY OF THE FOLD.
ITEM 1. Series of Fully Illustrated Original Designs. Printed by Newton and Eskell. 1891. Full-page diagrams throughout with facing letterpress description with forty-nine designs including: The True-Lovers' Knot; The Cockle-Shell; The Lady Betty Balfour; The Turkey-Cock Tail; The Spill-Box; The Four-Pointed Fan; The Duplex Vase; and The Opera Glasses. ITEM 2. THE BEAUTY OF THE FOLD. A Conversation with Joan Sallas. Edited by Charlotte Birnhaum. Sternberg Press. ON THE TABLE SERIES.
ITEM 1. SOLE EDITION. 4to. Inside cover advertisements for Newton & Eskell publications. (1)List of designs. Verso Advert for Alfred Suzanne's Egg Cookery. No title page (not-proven, if one is called for). (1)Napkin Folding. 6-103. Each verso with explanation of Napkin shapes. Opposite page with each Napkin diagram. Last 3 pages + inside cover: Advertisements for Newton & Eskell publications. Covers are very lightly dusted. A very small damp stain to the top of the covers. Very light staining to the last two pages. Back cover advert for 'The Caterer and Hotel-keeper.' Publisher's cloth-backed printed boards. Spine re-backed with dark green cloth spine. Overall a very nice item. ITEM 2. FIRST EDITION. 2012. 183 x 113mm. 2feps (one with publisher's details. Title page. 1p Contents. [1] 7-9 Forward. On the verso; 2 b/w photographs of a huge feature from a 1677 folding manual. 11-27. [1] 2nd Title page. 30-86. The b/w photographs of folding techniques. [1] Verso with Advertisements. 1fep. Hard cardboard cream covers with decoration and text in maroon. Condition as new.
- ITEM 1. Napkin folding is most commonly encountered (but less often nowadays) as an elaborate table decoration in fancy restaurants. Although the modern trend is for clean, unstarched, simply folded white cloths, that have had the minimum of handling, giving a sense of good conscious health and safety awareness. It is now becoming quite rare to see the elaborate folded fantasies of the past. Typically, and for best results, a clean, pressed, well-starched square cloth (linen or cotton) napkin was used. There were many variations in napkin folding in which a rectangular napkin, or a napkin ring, a glass, or even multiple napkins may have been used. The earliest instruction manual for the artistic folding of napkins was published in 1639 by Matthia Gieger, a German meat carver working in Padua. It was part of a series of treatises on the culinary arts titled 'Le Tre Trattati'. Napkin folding has a centuries-old history and dates back to the times of Louis XIV of France (1638 – 1715), also known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (le Roi-Soleil). He was the monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1643 until his death. The shift of the napkin from simply a folded cloth to a folded creative object occurred in 16th century Florence, Italy around the same time as voluminous clothing, such as ballooned sleeves, had become fashionable among the wealthy. Rather than simply laying a tablecloth flat on a table, starched linens were folded into large centre-pieces, called "triumphs," that could depict a variety of real and mythical animals, natural elements and architectural forms. (See item 1098 on this book-site, titled, 'Roger, Earl of Castlemaine's Embassy' by Michael Wright to get a sense of the amazing "triumphs" made from sculpted sugar pastilliage). A popular gift wedding guests received during this time was a personally folded napkin that distinguished whether they were related to the bride or groom. In the mid-18th century, table setting practices were so specific that in Germany there were particular traditions on how to fold napkins, display figures at the table and arrange plate. During this golden age of napkin folding, there was a school in Nuremberg devoted entirely to this art and butlers had shelves of instructional books to keep up with the changes in the field. Napkin folding in the form of table sculptures began being replaced by porcelain decorations during the 18th century. When I was in the Catering school in the early 1960's we students used to enjoy learning new shapes of folded napkin fantasies. Another age another time. ITEM 2. Features German master Joan Sallas, whose folded napkins graced the Metropolitan Museum's exhibit of 1780 Viennese royal table silver. (Watch him fold a ''water lily'' napkin on YouTube.) A virtuoso of the fold, has meticulously researched and mastered the history and techniques of the art of the fold. With the banquet table as a setting, his expertise and philosophy pour forth in the form of splendid, folded linen. In this precious book, Sallas shares his folding wisdom, which editor Charlotte Birnbaum contextualizes in two essays on the history of napkin folding. The texts are accompanied by an illustrated catalogue of folding techniques. A fascinating little book and a good accompaniment

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11293

ANON.       - The names of authors written in ink.
THE ART OF DINING;
or GASTRONOMY AND GASTRONOMERS, (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852. 2nd PART: MUSIC AND THE ART OF DRESS. TWO ESSAYS REPRINTED FORM THE 'QUARTERY REVIEW.' (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 110 mm. 2FEPS. Title page, with author's name; By A. Hayward QC. Verso: Adverts for John Murray publications. (1)Prefatory Notice. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 128. (1)130 - 137 Appendix. Verso Adverts for John Murray publications. 2nd. PART. Title page, with author's name; By Lady Eastlake. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 112. 2feps. Quarter light tan leather binding with marbled paper and light tan leather tips to boards. Spine with blind and gilt tooling and black and gilt label. All text block edges marbled. An elegant book.
- A hugely fascinating book with articles from at least ten famous (at the time) people: Lords, Lady's, Diplomats, Counts and Editors. The author whose name in ink adorns the top of the title page of the first part seems to be by Abraham Hayward QC. who wrote many articles, letters and reviews. The second author whose name also appears in ink atop the second title page is Lady Elizabeth Eastlake, a 43 year-old in 1852. A reviewer, translator and essayist, who was famously the object of hallucination by the great English painter J.M.W. Turner, on his deathbed. On pages 30/31 there is a very interesting detailed report by a Lady Morgan, (famous Irish author and reviewer) about a dinner cooked by Careme at Baron Rothschild's villa. Before this, on page 29, there are a series of distinctions of the varying professional merits of the two most famous Chefs of the time, and alleged rivals; Careme and Beauvilliers. Careme is viewed as superior on 'invention' and Beauvilliers' more remarkable for 'judgement' but had exhausted the old world of the art, while Careme discovered a new one. On page 73 after a discussion of the great culinary reputations of the current crop of named British Chefs and their placements, it is Louis Eustache Ude whom they place at the top, due to his twenty years educating the palate of the late Earl of Sefton. This is the same Ude who wrote the famous book of cookery titled 'The French Cook', and later the Chef de Cuisine of Crockfords Club in St. James's, Mayfair. Page after page of anecdotes, gossip and essays of the History of Cookery, the Gastronomic effects of the French Revolution, accounts of Paris Restaurants, famous Dinners in England, merits of female and male Cooks etc etc. Of great interest to anyone who wants more detailed information on the great Chefs of that era, and their famous Patrons.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11286