ANON.       - Extremely scarce to rare; one of only three copies found.
Every Family's Cookery Book
OR, PLAIN AND PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR PROPERLY PREPARING, COOKING, AND SERVING-UP ALL SORTS OF PROVISIONS, COMPRISING MEATS, POULTRY, FISH, GAME. AND VEGETABLE FOOD. ALSO, Soups, Gravies, Sauces, Pies, Puddings, Pastry, Sweet Dishes, Sweetmeats, Cakes, Bread, Wines, Ale, Beer, Porter, Pickles, &c., &c., &c. DIRECTIONS OF CARVING. THE CHOOSING AND BUYING OF FISH, FLESH AND FOWL. BY AN EXPERIENCED COOK. WAKEFIELD: WILLIAM NICHOLSON AND SONS. London: S.D. EWINS &Co., 22, Paternoster Row.
FIRST EDITION. n/d circa 1850-64. 8vo 1fep replaced. Engraved frontispieces and Title page. [1] Title page. [1] 1p Introduction. [1] (1)8-405. (1)407-416 Index. 1fep. 10 plates of Carving, butcher's cuts, fish etc. Numerous engravings in-text. Engraved title pages uniformly browned. Slightly dusty throughout. With the original blind stamped and embossed dark green and blue fine cloth covers and spine with black relief and slightly faded gilt. Overall the text block is fine, albeit in a slightly used condition and with a lovely original cover.
- A cookery book with a difference! In the 'Introduction' we learn the book is the work of an Authoress. It is also very well laid out with very good plates that have obviously had more effort than usual applied to their production. The cover is very nice and unusual in its detail and presentation. Not in Bitting, Cagle, Attar, Oxford, Hazlitt. No copies in the B.L. Copac has 2 copies. One at the Guildhall Lib. London with no date, and another copy in Leeds, also with 416 pages, printed in Halifax dated 1864. This copy printed in Wakefield with same page collation, but with no date. A search of World Libraries provided no results. A probable minimum of 2 editions with this being the first. One assumes extreme scarcity to rarity.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11109

ANON.       - A rare dinner invitation to the London Tavern, Bishopsgate St. 1857.
LINEN DRAPERS SILK MERCHANTS
LACEMENS' HABERDASHERS' AND HOSIERS' INSTITUTION. THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY DINNER, AT THE London Tavern, Bishopsgate Street, on Tuesday, February 24th, 1857. SIR JOHN VILLIERS SHELLEY, BART., M.P., IN THE CHAIR. STEWARDS: Mr. FREDRK. ARMFIELD - Mr. JOHN ALLAN - Mr. JOHN FIVEASH - Mr. JOHN GEB - Mr. JOHN JARVIS - Mr. ROBERT MINTON - Mr. OSBORN - Mr. THOS. RUSSELL - Mr. W. RUTTY - Mr. J. RABBIDGE - Mr. JAMES ROBBINS - Mr. JOHN SCOTT - Mr. G.F. WALLIS. The Musical Arrangements under the management of Mr. Lawler, assisted by Miss Poole, Miss B. Palmer, and others. This Ticket will admit Mr. ------------ Dinner on Table at Six o'Clock, exact time. --TICKETS, including Wine, ONe Guinea. NO. 435. GEORGE BRACE, Secretary, 24, Surry Street, Strand. Tickets not returned to the secretary on or before the 20th of February, to be paid for.
115x150mm. Cream coloured card with black, red and green coloured text. Nice clean condition.
- Bishopsgate Street was anciently divided into Bishopsgate Street Within (i.e. within the walls of London) and Bishopsgate Street Without, and derives its name after one of the original seven gates in London Wall. The foundation of the original gate is attributed to Erkenwald, elected Bishop of London in 675. Henry III granted the gate (which would have contained buildings above and beside it) to the Hanse merchants, who substantially rebuilt the gate in 1479: the gate was adorned with statues of past bishops of London. It was declared an obstruction to traffic in the eighteenth century and subsequently demolished. Bishopsgate Street Within contained three churches, St Martin Outreach, St Ethelburga, and St Helen, and the famous Crosby Hall as well as the London Tavern, used for many public meetings, banquets and dinners. Bishopsgate Street Without was wider and longer than Within, and during medieval times many pleasure gardens and bowling alleys ran off it. Throughout most of its history Bishopsgate Street has been one of the City's main commercial streets, and has housed many fine mansions of the nobility, of whom many were entertained by the plays performed at the Bull Inn, a famous playhouse of Elizabethan times. Afterward they would have dined at the nearby London Tavern, one of the best known and most prestigious city venues. See print #2 below for an image of a small salon inside the London Tavern.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 11105

ANON.       - with a meeting and Dinner for the famous Pitt Club.
London Tavern
Tree items of Ephemera. 1. A letter. 2. A table-plan. 3. An Illustration of a lavish Dinner.
ITEM 1. A general folded letter headed 'The Pitt Club' addressed to Tho. Olney, from A.D. Welch; Secretary, inviting him to the London Tavern for a General Meeting of the Club on Friday May 16th, 1828 to participate in a ballot for the 48 candidates named in the letter. The invitation is also for a celebration Dinner on the anniversary of Pitts birthday on May 28th. ITEM 2. An A3 sheet of strong paper showing an extremely well-designed table plan for an Inauguration Banquet at the Tavern on November 3rd, 1870. This table plan alone with its list of 40 titled people at the top-table, [see image # 2 below] gives a true first impression of the professionalism of the Tavern's organisation. ITEM 3. This is a wonderful Illustrated London News engraving dated Feb.12th 1859, of a complimentary dinner set-up for Mr Davis, The Huntsman of Her Majesties Staghounds at the London Tavern. All items housed in a marble papered folder.
- These items of ephemera, are interesting for two reasons. The London Tavern and its table settings and the historic Pitt Club, meeting there on May 3rd 1828. The Tavern was the most prestigious catering venue in London. (for a full description of the Tavern and its massive catering operation, see item # 11217, on this book-site.) The Pitt Club was apparently officially founded in Michaelmas term 1835, [although the letter here, irrefutably proves the club members were being nominated already in 1828.] and named in honour of the Prime Minister, from 1783 – January 1801 - William Pitt the Younger, who had previously been a student at Pembroke College, Cambridge. The Pitt Club was originally intended as one of many political clubs set up across Great Britain, 'to do honour to the name and memory of Mr William Pitt, and to uphold in general the political principles for which he stood'. In particular the University Pitt Club was intended to assist the local party organisations of the town of Cambridge to return worthy, that is to say, Tory, representatives to Parliament and to the Borough Council. From the start, however, there was a social element as the Club's political events were combined with 'the pleasures of social intercourse at dinner, when party fervour among friends, dining in party uniform, might be warmed towards a political incandescence by the speeches to successive toasts'. Over the course of the Pitt Club's first few decades, the political element diminished whilst the social element increased. By '1868, at the latest, the Pitt Club ceased from all political activity and elected members to its social advantages without any regards whatever to considerations of political party'. Though the Club's 'raison d'ętre' changed in its early years, it was from the first, and always remained, an undergraduate organization. The Pitt Club has been in almost continuous operation since its founding. During the First World War, however, the Club's existence became increasingly tenuous as more Cambridge men joined the forces. It temporarily closed in October 1917 but reopened in early 1919. By 1920, the Club had become, according to the Minutes; "nearly normal again, the only real trouble being the horrible scarcity of whisky". After the Second World War and they had to seek alternative accommodation, and eventually settled for rooms above the post office in Trinity Street, which they called the Interim Club. On 7 November 2017, a referendum to elect women into the club passed. This did not pass without controversy though, with only resident members being granted a vote. With ladies now elected, one imagines that the full maturation of the historical Pitt 'Social' Club's non-political activities progressed to everyone's full satisfaction. These are rare items of ephemera, especially the dating of the Pitt Club's activities in the letter. The other surprise also, is the London Tavern's high level of quality.

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category
ref number: 11319

ANON.      
THE Lady's Companion:
VOLUME 1. CONTAINING Upwards of Three Thousand different Receipts: in every Kind of COOKERY: AND Those the best and most fashionable; BEING Four Times the Quantity of any Book of this Sort. 1. Making near two Hundred different Sorts of Soops, Pottages, Broth, Sauces, Cullies, &c. after the French, Italian, Dutch, and English Way; also making Cake Soop for the Pocket. 11. Dressing Flesh, Fish and Fowl; this last Illustrated with Cuts, shewing how every Fowl is to be truss'd. 111. Directions for making Ragoos and Fricaseys. 1V. Directions for Dressing all Manner of Kitchen Garden Stuff, &c. V. Making two Hundred different Sorts of Puddings, Florendines, Tanzeys, &c. which are four Times the Number to be met (2 long perpendicular lines) with any other Book of this Kind. V1. The whole Art of Pastry, in [n aking - sic] upwards of two Hundred Pies, (with the Shapes of them engraven on Copper-Plates) Tarts, Pasties. Custards, Cheese-Cakes, Yorkshire Muffins, &c. V11. Receipts for all Manner of [Pick ing - sic] Potting, collaring, &c. V111. For Preserving, making Creams, Jellies, and all Manner of Confectionary, with particular Receipts for making Orgeat and Blanc Manger. 1X. Rules amd Directions for setting out [D nners, - sic] Suppers, and grand Entertainments. To which is added, Bills of Fare for every Month in the Year. ALSO Directions for Brewing Beers, Ales, &c. making all Sorts of English Wines, Cyder, Mum, Metheglin, Vinegar, Verjuice, Catchup, &c. WITH The receipts of Mrs Stephens for the Stone; Dr. Mead for the Bite of a Mad Dog; the recipe, sent from Ireland, for the Gout; Sir Hans Sloane's Receipt for Sore Eyes; and the receipt for making Tar Water. (1 long horizontal line) The SIXTH EDITION with Large Additions. (1 long horizontal line) VOL.1. (1 long horizontal line) LONDON: Printed for J. HODGES, on London-Bridge; and R. BALDWIN, at the Rose, in Pater-noster Row. 1753. VOLUME 11. is the Fifth Edition. Title page same as previous, except the three typos on the sixth edition are not evident here.
VOLUME 1. 179 x 113mm. 1 new fep. 1 original with inscription - Liz. Booker. Book AD 1757. [1] Frontispiece. Title Page with ink inscription on verso tipped in, with a warning "not to steal this book". (1)2-413. [1] Sixteen pages of Index to the first volume. 1fep. With seven pages of illustrations of trussing. Also nine pages of Bills of Fare. Text block fine. Frontispiece, tittle page somewhat browned and stained with no loss. VOLUME 11. 179 x 115mm. 1 new fep. 1 original fep. Title Page with ink recipe on verso tipped in for 'French Rowles'. (1)2-422. Eight pages of Index to the second volume. 2fep. With eight pages of ornate pie shapes. Text block nice and clean with the title page slightly age browned. Both volumes bound in full dark brown calf with both spines rather sunned. Boards with elaborate blind tooling and edged with thin gilt lines. The spines with raised bands and blind and gilt tooling. With red labels, gilt text and small round breen labels for volume numbers.
- Although the author is unknown and has produced a very large quantity of text, filling two thick volumes, the question arises; why not put a name to what is actually an impressive cookery book.? It is hard to imagine an independent publisher or even a production this size issued by a publishing quango, being profitable. The Title page proclaims boldly, that it is "Four Times the Quantity of any Book of the Sort". With near 200 soups alone, Including The Cook and Housewife's Calendar, or monthly list of things in season from January to December; Proper articles to cover the table every month ; Specimen of a Housekeepers Book with year-end statement; Marketing tables from one penny three farthings to three pence; table of expenses, income and wages from farthings to pounds and back to farthings; The eight pages of plates are impressive, but can also be found (albeit, arranged in a different sequence) in the book of 'Receipts of Pastry and Cookery' of Edward Kidder first published around1720. Whatever the true facts are, it is a very impressive set.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11309

Anon.      
The Oyster.
WHERE, HOW, AND WHEN TO FIND, BREED, COOK AND EAT IT. (With a woodcut vignette of Oysters) LONDON: TRUBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCLXI.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 12mo. 1fep. [1] Humorous wood-engraved frontispiece of two oysters. Title page. [1] v-viii Contents. 9-96. 1-8 Advertisements. 1fep. Original publishers coloured pictorial boards, very slightly worn but still fresh looking. With a re-laid sympathetic chocolate-brown calf spine with horizontal gilt lettering and lines. Internally very clean. A very nice copy of a very scarce book.
- Cagle p.657 - informs: All the wood engravings, as well as the ones repeated on the covers are by George Cruikshank. There is also an anatomical wood engraving of an oyster on p 30. Halkett and Laing attribute this work to Herbert Byng Hall (1805?-1883) and state that it has been erroneously attributed to Eustace Clare Grenville Murray (1824-1881) BMC enters it under Hall and the NUC under Murray. Axford on p. 312 miss-dates it 1959. Besides it being confusingly assigned to so many contributors it is an uncommon, interesting and scarce book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11018

ANON.       - Two instruction manuals, one old and rare; one modern.
ITEM 1. NAPKIN FOLDING: ITEM 2. THE BEAUTY OF THE FOLD.
ITEM 1. Series of Fully Illustrated Original Designs. Printed by Newton and Eskell. 1891. Full-page diagrams throughout with facing letterpress description with forty-nine designs including: The True-Lovers' Knot; The Cockle-Shell; The Lady Betty Balfour; The Turkey-Cock Tail; The Spill-Box; The Four-Pointed Fan; The Duplex Vase; and The Opera Glasses. ITEM 2. THE BEAUTY OF THE FOLD. A Conversation with Joan Sallas. Edited by Charlotte Birnhaum. Sternberg Press. ON THE TABLE SERIES.
ITEM 1. SOLE EDITION. 4to. Inside cover advertisements for Newton & Eskell publications. (1)List of designs. Verso Advert for Alfred Suzanne's Egg Cookery. No title page (not-proven, if one is called for). (1)Napkin Folding. 6-103. Each verso with explanation of Napkin shapes. Opposite page with each Napkin diagram. Last 3 pages + inside cover: Advertisements for Newton & Eskell publications. Covers are very lightly dusted. A very small damp stain to the top of the covers. Very light staining to the last two pages. Back cover advert for 'The Caterer and Hotel-keeper.' Publisher's cloth-backed printed boards. Spine re-backed with dark green cloth spine. Overall a very nice item. ITEM 2. FIRST EDITION. 2012. 183 x 113mm. 2feps (one with publisher's details. Title page. 1p Contents. [1] 7-9 Forward. On the verso; 2 b/w photographs of a huge feature from a 1677 folding manual. 11-27. [1] 2nd Title page. 30-86. The b/w photographs of folding techniques. [1] Verso with Advertisements. 1fep. Hard cardboard cream covers with decoration and text in maroon. Condition as new.
- ITEM 1. Napkin folding is most commonly encountered (but less often nowadays) as an elaborate table decoration in fancy restaurants. Although the modern trend is for clean, unstarched, simply folded white cloths, that have had the minimum of handling, giving a sense of good conscious health and safety awareness. It is now becoming quite rare to see the elaborate folded fantasies of the past. Typically, and for best results, a clean, pressed, well-starched square cloth (linen or cotton) napkin was used. There were many variations in napkin folding in which a rectangular napkin, or a napkin ring, a glass, or even multiple napkins may have been used. The earliest instruction manual for the artistic folding of napkins was published in 1639 by Matthia Gieger, a German meat carver working in Padua. It was part of a series of treatises on the culinary arts titled 'Le Tre Trattati'. Napkin folding has a centuries-old history and dates back to the times of Louis XIV of France (1638 – 1715), also known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (le Roi-Soleil). He was the monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1643 until his death. The shift of the napkin from simply a folded cloth to a folded creative object occurred in 16th century Florence, Italy around the same time as voluminous clothing, such as ballooned sleeves, had become fashionable among the wealthy. Rather than simply laying a tablecloth flat on a table, starched linens were folded into large centre-pieces, called "triumphs," that could depict a variety of real and mythical animals, natural elements and architectural forms. (See item 1098 on this book-site, titled, 'Roger, Earl of Castlemaine's Embassy' by Michael Wright to get a sense of the amazing "triumphs" made from sculpted sugar pastilliage). A popular gift wedding guests received during this time was a personally folded napkin that distinguished whether they were related to the bride or groom. In the mid-18th century, table setting practices were so specific that in Germany there were particular traditions on how to fold napkins, display figures at the table and arrange plate. During this golden age of napkin folding, there was a school in Nuremberg devoted entirely to this art and butlers had shelves of instructional books to keep up with the changes in the field. Napkin folding in the form of table sculptures began being replaced by porcelain decorations during the 18th century. When I was in the Catering school in the early 1960's we students used to enjoy learning new shapes of folded napkin fantasies. Another age another time. ITEM 2. Features German master Joan Sallas, whose folded napkins graced the Metropolitan Museum's exhibit of 1780 Viennese royal table silver. (Watch him fold a ''water lily'' napkin on YouTube.) A virtuoso of the fold, has meticulously researched and mastered the history and techniques of the art of the fold. With the banquet table as a setting, his expertise and philosophy pour forth in the form of splendid, folded linen. In this precious book, Sallas shares his folding wisdom, which editor Charlotte Birnbaum contextualizes in two essays on the history of napkin folding. The texts are accompanied by an illustrated catalogue of folding techniques. A fascinating little book and a good accompaniment

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11293

ANON.       - The names of authors written in ink.
THE ART OF DINING;
or GASTRONOMY AND GASTRONOMERS, (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852. 2nd PART: MUSIC AND THE ART OF DRESS. TWO ESSAYS REPRINTED FORM THE 'QUARTERY REVIEW.' (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 110 mm. 2FEPS. Title page, with author's name; By A. Hayward QC. Verso: Adverts for John Murray publications. (1)Prefatory Notice. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 128. (1)130 - 137 Appendix. Verso Adverts for John Murray publications. 2nd. PART. Title page, with author's name; By Lady Eastlake. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 112. 2feps. Quarter light tan leather binding with marbled paper and light tan leather tips to boards. Spine with blind and gilt tooling and black and gilt label. All text block edges marbled. An elegant book.
- A hugely fascinating book with articles from at least ten famous (at the time) people: Lords, Lady's, Diplomats, Counts and Editors. The author whose name in ink adorns the top of the title page of the first part seems to be by Abraham Hayward QC. who wrote many articles, letters and reviews. The second author whose name also appears in ink atop the second title page is Lady Elizabeth Eastlake, a 43 year-old in 1852. A reviewer, translator and essayist, who was famously the object of hallucination by the great English painter J.M.W. Turner, on his deathbed. On pages 30/31 there is a very interesting detailed report by a Lady Morgan, (famous Irish author and reviewer) about a dinner cooked by Careme at Baron Rothschild's villa. Before this, on page 29, there are a series of distinctions of the varying professional merits of the two most famous Chefs of the time, and alleged rivals; Careme and Beauvilliers. Careme is viewed as superior on 'invention' and Beauvilliers' more remarkable for 'judgement' but had exhausted the old world of the art, while Careme discovered a new one. On page 73 after a discussion of the great culinary reputations of the current crop of named British Chefs and their placements, it is Louis Eustache Ude whom they place at the top, due to his twenty years educating the palate of the late Earl of Sefton. This is the same Ude who wrote the famous book of cookery titled 'The French Cook', and later the Chef de Cuisine of Crockfords Club in St. James's, Mayfair. Page after page of anecdotes, gossip and essays of the History of Cookery, the Gastronomic effects of the French Revolution, accounts of Paris Restaurants, famous Dinners in England, merits of female and male Cooks etc etc. Of great interest to anyone who wants more detailed information on the great Chefs of that era, and their famous Patrons.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11286

Anon.       - Very rare.
The English and FRENCH COOK:
DESCRIBING The best and newest ways of ordering and dres-sing all sorts of Flesh, Fish and Fowl, whe-ther boiled, baked, stewed, roasted, broiled, frigassied, fryed, souc'd, marrinated, or pickl-ed; with their proper Sauces and Garnishes: Together with all manner of the most ap-proved Soops and Potages used, either in England or France. By T.P. J.P. R.C. N.E. And several other approved Cooks of London and Westminster. LONDON: Printed for Simon Miller at the Star, at the West-end of St. Pauls. 1674.
FIRST EDITION. Small thick 12mo. 1fep (rather brittle and loose) Title page a little browned and cracked at edges, without loss. 2pp The Epistle. 1-430. 431-450 Bills of Fare. 14pp The Table. 8pp Book Advertisements. 1fep. Pages 292-309 missing. Original full calf binding without end-papers, exposed on binders cardboard. The binding is torn at the top of spine without loss. Very lightly age browned throughout. Overall a nice but beaten copy with the original binders stitching just holding the gatherings. With a nice patina.
- Oxford states; This must be the book that was denounced in the third edition of (Varenne's English translation) 'The French Cook'. Oxford further states, 'The English and French Cook' appeared in 1694 under the new title 'The Compleat Cook'. Arber states there is a 1690 edition called the 'The Compleat English and French Cook'. The BL and the Bodleian each have one copy dated 1674. Notaker lists in the US the Folger, Harvard & UW Madison. All editions are extremely rare.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11090

ANON.       - A thoughtful publication.
EDIBLE ANDD POISONOUS FUNGI.
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE & FISHERIES. BULLETIN No. 23. Crown Copyright Reserved. LONDON: HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONARY OFFICE 1947.
6th Edition of August 1945 reprinted. 129 x 142 mm. 1fep with editions on verso. Title Page. Verso (iii) Contents. iv - v. Forward. 1 -7 Introduction. 8 Diagrams. 9 - 63 One page Facts/explanations facing one page Coloured Illustration of each mushroom. [1] Purchasing instruction directly form H.M. Stationary Office. 1fep with some other Govt. publications. Hard cardboard cream cover with 1/4 brown cloth binding. Very good condition.
- A very well put together important book. The first edition was printed 1910, the last is this one. It may be assumed that those were the lean years encompassing two world wars. A time when mushroom hunting and picking would have inspired hungry amateurs not fully aware of the dangers. This is why His Majesties Govt. printed it. Compared to other books about mushrooms this one is very simple in its explanation with very clear painted, full-page illustrations. This is definitely a book to carry when rambling in woods or meadows. Also with advice for cooking, eating or drying. A good book.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11277

Anon.      
MARZIPAN.
JOHN F. RENSHAW & COMPANY LIMITED. MITCHAM: SURREY ENGLAND.
FIRST EDITION. Circa 1930. 223 x 160 mm. No Title page (as should be). 1-2 Forward. 3 Introduction. 4 - 44. [one colour plate]. 45 - 46. Modelling Tools. 47. Stencils. 48. Renshaw Products. 49. Index. Full coloured plates throughout of cakes and pastries with recipes. Cream Coloured thick cardboard. Front cover finely decorated with ornate border and illustration of Renshaw Company building in Mitchum in South London. Raised text. Excellent condition.
- This is a fantastic company pastry cookery book for one product. It is a much better production than a lot of other cookery books of the time. Renshaw was founded in 1898 by John F Renshaw, to bring Marzipan to the UK market. Over time, the business grew and acquired a site in Mitcham, Surrey, in 1924 and was based there for the next 65 years. During this time, their product range expanded and in the 1970’s, as a result of the business growth, the company merged with Allmey & Layfield, a Liverpool-based manufacturer of bakery ingredients, in 1980. By the end of the 1980’s all manufacturing had transferred up to Liverpool from Mitcham. The Royal Warrant was first granted in January 1950 for the supply of Marzipan, Almonds and Cashew nuts. They are the only Bakery Ingredients company that holds a Royal Warrant, that demonstrates their good quality and service. Over time, Renshaw were called upon to deliver special foods, e.g Petits-Fours, for diplomatic functions and similar receptions. They also called upon for technical advice on regular occasions and also produced Christmas cakes and Marzipan decorations for the Royal residences of Clarence House near Pall Mall London and the Castle of Mey near John o'Groats at the northern tip of Scotland. A fine and distinguished company.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11276