Bradley.   Richard    
THE Country Housewife
AND LADY’S DIRECTOR, For every Month of the Year, BOTH IN THE Frugal Management of a House, and in the Delights and Profits of a FARM. CONTAINING The Whole Art of Cookery, LAID DOWN IN A great Variety of the Best and Cheapest Receipts for Dressing all Sorts of Flesh, Fish, Fowl, Fruits, and Herbs, which are the Productions of a Farm, or any foreign Parts. LIKEWISE The best Methods to be observed in Brewing Malt Liquors, and Making the several Sorts of English Wines. THE Arts of Pickling, Preserving, Confectionary, Pastry, &c. &c. Together with a few of the Most approved and efficacious Medicines, proper to be kept in every private Family. Published for the Good of the Public. By R. BRADLEY. Professor of Botany in the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of the Royal Society. The Sixth Edition. With great Additions and Improvements. LONDON: Printed for W.Bristow, the West-End of St.Paul's Cathederal, and C.Ethrington, at York. 1762.
12mo. 1fep. Title page.[1] 4p Introduction 'To the Ladies' 1+2-328. Monthly Dishes 329-343. Index 344-352. 1fep. Fully bound in original dark tan tree calf. With a re-laid spine with gilt lines and red and green labels with gilt lettering. With a nice patina. Internally nice and clean.
- Richard Bradley. 1688 – 1732, was a Professor of Botany at Cambridge. He was a prolific writer and his book ‘The Country Housewife’ is an eclectic mix of subjects, besides the usual chapters found in an eighteenth century cookery book. There is even an interesting section on the drying of Saffron. Bradley’s reputation in academic circles was severely besmirched in a very acrimonious and public dispute with Patrick Blair, an ambitious Scottish physician and fellow of the Royal Society. Whenever any bibliographical reference to Bradley is brought up, the dispute is part of his file. Whatever Bradley's reputation, his book ‘The Country Housewife’ is a very scarce and uncommon item, much sought after by collectors

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11039

BRADSHAW.   PENELOPE     Very scarce 9th ed. circa 1747.
BRADSHAW'S VALUABLE FAMILY JEWEL,
BEING A STORE-HOUSE OF SUCH Curious Matters as All ought to be acquainted with, who intend to spend their lives either pleasant or profitable. Containing All that relates to CONFECTIONARY, COOKERY, PASTRY, PRESERVING, (with a small perpendicular line between) PICKLING, CORDIALS, MADE WINES, , BREWING &c. With a great Number of other Necessary Articles not to be met with in any other Book: Particularly, an excellent Method for the Management of a Beer-Cellar: How to keep Ale or Beer always exceeding Fine; and how to restore four Beer to its first Perfection; which Article has been of the utmost Service to the Purchasers of this Book. Likewise, an excellent Method to preserve a constant Stock of Yeast, even in the most scarce Seasons. In this Book is likewise inserted Mons. Millien's Method of preserving Metals from Rust, such as Guns, Grates, Candle-Sticks, &c. for the Discovery of which the Royal Academy of Paris gave him 10,000 l. (one long horizontal line) By Mrs. Penelope Bradshaw. (a second-long horizontal line) The Nineth [sic] Edition. [Price One Shilling.]
Small octavo. n/d circa 1747. 155 x 100 mm. Original inside cover and end-papers marbled. [1] 1fep. Title page. [1] 2p To the Reader. (1)vi-xi Index. (1)13-96. 2feps. Foxing or other spotting throughout; edges trimmed at an early date, just barely effecting text, but still full text is legible throughout. Early paper restoration to fore edge to pages of 49-56, again not effecting text. All in all, a handsome copy of a very scarce book.
- This book is as confusing as 'Edward Kidder's Receipts of Pastry and Cookery', to bibliographically ascertain publishing dates. Maclean on page 14 states the earliest known edition of this work is the 10th edition which was "certainly" printed in 1748. Then confusingly she notes no edition before the her stated fifth (with very large additions included within the 136 pages) of 1749. Then to top it all off, she has a stated 6th ed also "certainly" printed in 1749 and has a sixth of 1754. She also assumes; "Mrs. Bradshaw could have been misusing edition numbers to imply by 1748 that she had written a work that was much in demand". Given that the some editions appeared in earlier years, it is quite possible that the publishers began with a late edition number either to make the book sound more popular to the buying public, or if the recipes were lifted from other authors thus avoiding accusations of plagiarism by claiming that Bradshaw's book had already appeared earlier. All editions are rare with only three auction records cited for all editions. [OCLC locates ten copies of all editions, and just one copy (LOC) of this edition; ESTC N65042; Bitting, page 56; citing this edition (LOC copy); Cagle 575 (see notes); Maggs Bros, Catalogue 582; not in Oxford nor Vicaire. Villinova University Library includes 1748, 1749 & 1751 editions. The Wellcome Collection has a 1749 ed. Penn State University Library has a 12th ed.of 1749. Australian Libraries has a 10th ed of 1748. Because of the mind-boggling variance in dated editions, this stated ninth can possibly be dated 1747 or earlier.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11333

Briggs.   Richard     - Recipes for ‘Syringed Fritters, Nun's Farts and Churros.’
THE English Art of Cookery,
ACCORDING TO THE PRESENT PRACTICE; BEING A Complete Guide to all Housekeepers, ON A PLAN ENTIRELY NEW; CONSISTING OF THIRTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS. CONTAINING, Proper Directions for Marketing, and Trussing of poultry. The making of Soups and Broths. Dressing all Sorts of Fish. Sauces for every Occasion. Boiling and Roasting. Baking, Broiling and Frying. Stews and Hashes. Made Dishes of every Sort. Ragoos and Fricasees. Directions for dressing all Sorts of Roots and Vegetables. All Sorts of Aumlets and Eggs. Puddings, Pies, Tarts, &c. Pancakes and Fritters. Cheesecakes and Custards. Blancmange, Jellies, and Syllabubs. Directions for the Sick. Directions for Seafaring Men. Preserving, Syrups, and Conserves. Hogs Puddings, Sausages, &c. Potting, and little cold Dishes. The Art of Carving. Coliaring, Salting, and Sousing. Pickling. To keep Garden Vegetables, &c. A Catalogue of Things in Season. Made Wines and Cordial Waters. Brewing. English and French Bread, &c. WITH BILLS OF FARE FOR EVENY MONTH IN THE YEAR, Neatly and correctly engraved on Twelve Copper-Plates. By RICHARD BRIGGS, MANY YEARS COOK AT THE GLOBE TAVERN, FLEET-STREET, THE WHITE HART TAVERN, HOLBURN, AND NOW AT THE TEMPLE COFFEE-HOUSE. LONDON: PRINTED FOR G.G.J. AND J.ROBINSON, PATER-NOSTER-ROW.
8vo. 1fep. Half title.[1] Title page.[1] 1+iv To the Reader. 1+ii-xx Contents. p24 (versos blank) 12 Bills of Fare. 1+2-656. 1fep. Quarter mid-tan calf and corners with tan cloth boards. Water stain to bottom of the first thirty pages not affecting text. Last two leaves slighty dusty with a small 1" tear on the last last page where it has been re-laid with a strip in the guttering without loss of text. Overall a good copy.
- In an interesting and amusing article online there appears a title, ‘Syringed Fritters, Nun's Farts and Churros.’ The fritters named in the extensive article were almost always made from a Choux pastry or other hot water pastry recipe, because this dough is quite elastic in nature and therefore able to be piped/syringed into hot oil without falling apart (see the 4th photograph below). Most recipes for fried Choux pastry from the late 17th to early 18th century consisted of small balls of pastry, rather than the syringed sticks. As these small choux pastry fritters were hollow and very light in texture they were often known as "Pets" (farts) in French cooking texts. In some cases they were known as "Whore's Farts" or "Nun's Farts" depending on the humour of the author. In the more straight-laced 19th century the nun's farts were often turned into the more subtly amusing "Sighs". In this book by Richard Briggs there is a recipe for Syringed Fritters. It is in effect a choux pastry recipe, and very similar to the French Beignets. A close match to this English recipe is found in François Marin's "Les Dons de Comus" called; ‘Beignets Seringues,’ A similar recipe (albeit, slightly more dense) is still popular today in Spain, Portugal, France, Mexico and South America. They are called Churros, and are definitely piped sticks rather than balls, and traditionally served with a thick chocolate drink. Interestingly there is a very good sweet made by the Newaris of Nepal called 'Sail'. They are exactly the same shape as Churros but made from rice flour, sugar and baking soda and to fry them the mixture is pushed through a hole in a coconut shell. This leads to very long churros that are big spirals. They are fried in pure cow or buffulo ghee. The Newaris reheat them by holding over a fire and this gives them a very delicious crispy smokiness. Richard Briggs's book is a well-written and comprehensive study of the professional kitchen of the time. He appears to be quite a humble person, proclaiming in the dedication; --- I submit this Performance, with Deference and Respect, as I am conscious that Errors will creep into the best Performances, and that of having corrected the Mistakes of former Works, and added the most useful Improvements derived from my own Practice and Experience -- [Temple Coffee-House, Oct.1, 1788] This second edition is much rarer than the first. This is accounted for by the fact that a much smaller amount were published compared to the first edition of 1788. The BL lists only two copies of the second; one in the UK and one in Poland.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11038

Brillat-Savarin.   Jean Anthelme     - A scarce translation of ‘Physiologie du Gout’
Gastronomy as a Fine Art
OR The Science of Good Living A TRANSLATION OF THE “PHYSIOLOGIE DU GOUT” OF BRILLAT SAVARIN BY R.E. ANDERSON, M.A. (A printers device) A NEW EDITION London CHATTO & WINDUS, PICADILLY 1889.
12mo. 2feps. Half title. [1] Title page. [1] (1)vi Contents. (1)viii-xv Aesthetics of the Dining-Table. [1] (1)xx-xxiv Dialogue. (1)xxvi-xxxiii Preface. [1] xxxvi-xxxviii Fundamental Truths. (1)2 – 280. (1)2-32 Advertisements. 1fep. Original quarter wine red cloth with marbled boards, rubbed on the corners and a half inch square of marbled paper missing on the front. Spine with gilt writings. A 1” black ink stain on the outer edge. Internally very clean with untrimmed edges. Overall a fairly nice copy of a quite scarce edition.
- Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin born 1st April 1755, at Belley, Ain and expired on 2nd February, 1826 in Paris. He was a French lawyer and politician, and gained fame as an epicure and gastronome: With ‘Grimod’ the two writers effectively founded the whole genre of the gastronomic essay. Brillat-Savarin’s celebrated book ‘Physiologie du goût’ was first translated into English, titled ‘A Handbook of Gastronomy’ and first published in December 1825, two months before his death. The full title is "Physiologie du Goût, ou Méditations de Gastronomie Transcendante; ouvrage théorique, historique et à l'ordre du jour, dédié aux Gastronomes parisiens, par un Professeur, membre de plusieurs sociétés littéraires et savantes". It is less a treatise on cuisine than a witty compendium of anecdotes and observations intended to enhance the pleasures of the table; only the occasional recipe is included. Also known for his famous aphorisms, some of which are recalled below: • “Those persons who suffer from indigestion, or who become drunk, are utterly ignorant of the true principles of eating and drinking.” • "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are." • "To receive guests is to take charge of their happiness during the entire time they are under your roof”. • "The discovery of a new dish confers more happiness on humanity, than the discovery of a new star”.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11132

Brillat-Savarin.   Jean Anthelme     - Nice small 2 volume set.
Physiologie du Gout.
VOL -1. - A printers device of a small star. A banner with SOL.VTE. BIBLIOTHEQUE UNIVERSELLE LEMERRE [a single line] BRILLAT-SAVARIN [a small single line] Physiologie du Gout Notice par Armand Rio TOME PREMIER. A small printers device. PARIS LIBRAIRE APLPHONSE LEMERRE. 23-33 PASSAGE CHOISEUL 23-33. VOL - 2. - BIBLIOTHEQUE UNIVERSELLE LEMERRE [a single line] BRILLAT-SAVARIN [a small single line] Physiologie du Gout Notice par Armand Rio TOME SECOND. A small printers device. PARIS LIBRAIRE APLPHONSE LEMERRE. 23-33 PASSAGE CHOISEUL 23-33.
VOL 1. 1fep marbled. Original grey card covers. [1] 1fep. Half-title. [1] Title page. [1] (1)6-12 Notice. (1)14-15 Aphorisms du Professeur. (1)17-249. [1] (1)254-256 Table. 1fep. Grey original back cover. 1fep Marbled. VOL 2. 1fep marbled. Original grey card covers. [1] 1fep. Half-title. [1] Title page. [1] (1)8-248 (1)250-253 Table. 1fep. Grey original back cover. 1fep Marbled. Both volumes 147 x 100 mm. N/D Circa 1930. Light blue pebbled leather covers, Dark blue leather corners and spines. Raised bands with intricate gilt tooling and text. Gilt devices in the compartments. A very fine leather bound set with curiously, the complete original books bound within. In very good condition thoughout.
- Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, born 1st April 1755, Belley, Ain, died 2nd February 1826, Paris, was a French lawyer and politician, and gained fame as an epicure and gastronome. He and Alexandre Balthazar Laurent Grimod de La Reynière, also a lawyer and writer, between them, effectively founded the whole genre of the gastronomic essay. Brillat-Savarin famous book carries his equally famous gastronomic aphorisms. The seven below give a sense of his fine observations…. 1. Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are. 2. Taste, which enables us to distinguish all that has a flavor from that which is insipid. 3. The German Doctors say that persons sensible of harmony have one sense more than others. 4. The sense of smell, like a faithful counsellor, foretells its character. 5. The senses are the organs by which man places himself in connexion with exterior objects. 6. A dessert without cheese is like a beautiful woman with only one eye. 7. The discovery of a new dish confers more happiness on humanity, than the discovery of a new star. 8. Alcohol carries the pleasures of the palate to their highest degree. His famous work, Physiologie du goût (The Physiology of Taste), was published in December 1825, two months before his death. It went on to be printed by countless companies and is one of the key items in any cookery collection, in any language.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11238

Brillat-Savarin.   Jean Anthelme     - An important edition illustrated by Bertall.
Physiologie du Gout
PAR BRILLAT SAVARIN, ILLUSTREE Par BERTALL PRECEDE D'UNE NOTICE BIOGRAPHIQUE Par ALPH. KARR.Dessins a part du texte, graves sur acier par Ch. Geoffroy, Gravures sur bois, intercalees dans le texte, par Midderigh. GABRIEL DE GONET, EDITEUR. RUE DES BEAUX-ARTS, 6.
238X160mm. Marbled paste-down and end-paper. 1fep. [1] Frontispiece titled 'Les Sens' (jpeg #3 below). Title page. [1] (1)ii-vii. [2] Engraved portrait of Brillat-Savarin. (1)x Aphorismes. (1)xii-xiv Dialogue. (1)xx-xxiii Preface.[1] (1)2-412. (1)414-416 Table des Mariers. 1fep. [1] Marbled Paste-down and end-paper. With 8 full page, highly amusing steel engraved plates of various culinary scenes, on India paper and many in-text illustrated vignettes. There is minor foxing throughout the text block. Contemporary binding by Barker's of Dercas Terrace, Hammersmith. Quarter brown calf with brown cloth boards and calf tips. Calf edges with gilt lines. Spine with raised bands and all compartments with French style gilt tooling and a red label with gilt lettering. All edges marbled. Overall the binding is solid and in good condition.
- Charles Albert Constant Nicolas Arnoux Limoges Saint-Saens, alias: Bertall, was born 18 December 1820 at Paris and died on 24 March 1882. An illustrator , cartoonist and writer, he is known for being one of the most prolific illustrators of the nineteenth century and one of the pioneers of photography . Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin born on April 1755, Belley, Ain, died 2nd February 1826, Paris. He was a French lawyer and politician, and gained fame as an epicure and gastronome: Grimod and Brillat-Savarin between them were the two writers who effectively founded the whole genre of the gastronomic essay. His famous work, ‘Physiologie du gout’ (The Physiology of Taste) , was published in December 1825, two months before his death. The full title is ‘Physiologie du Goût, ou Méditations de Gastronomie Transcendante; ouvrage théorique, historique et à l'ordre du jour, dédié aux Gastronomes parisiens, par un Professeur, membre de plusieurs sociétés littéraires et savante’. This great classic of Gastronomy is a witty and authoritative compendium on the art of dining that has never been out of print since it was first published. This 1848 copy, illustrated by Bertall is considered a very important version. The philosophy of Epicurus lies behind every page. The body of the work, though often wordy and sometimes aphoristic and axiomatic, has remained extremely important and sought after. It has often been analyzed and quoted through the years since his death. In a series of meditations that have the rhythm of a different age, of leisured reading and a confident pursuit of educated pleasures, Brillat-Savarin discourses and writes on the pleasures of the table, which he considers a science. His French models were the stylists of the Ancien Régime: Voltaire, Rousseau, Buffon and d'Aguesseau et al. Aside from Latin, he was well versed in five modern languages, and when the occasion suited, wasn't shy of parading them: he never hesitated to borrow a word when French failed him, like the English word 'sip', until he rediscovered the then obsolete verb 'siroter'. The simplest meal satisfied Brillat-Savarin, as long as it was executed with skill and artistry, which is further elaborated in one of his famous aphorisms: Those persons who suffer from indigestion, or who become drunk, are utterly ignorant of the true principles of eating and drinking

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11169

Buckton.   Catherine M.     A school, cookery and history book in one.
FOOD AND HOME COOKERY.
NEW EDITION COMPRISING OF A COURSE OF LESSONS WITH DIRECTIONS FOR THEIR PRCTICAL CARRYING OUT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NEW CODE OF REGULATIONS OF THE EDUCTAION DEPARTMENT 1882 BY CATHERINE M. BUCKTON MEMBER OF THE LEEDS SCHOOL BOARD: AUTHOR OF 'HEALTH OF THE HOUSE' AND 'TOWN AND WINDOW GARDENING' LONDON LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO. All rights reserved
120 x 178 x 12 mm. 1fep. [1] verso with Frontis of illustration of Kitchen. Title Page. verso 'Opinions of the Press'. (1)iv - vi Preface. (1)viii A Tabulation. ix - xliv Directions. (2) Contents and Illustrations. (1)xlviii Preface. (1)2 - 102. (1)104 - 108 Index. 1fep. On front inside cover; Birmingham school Board prize label. Publishers black cloth. Blind stamp title to the front board. Gilt title on the spine. Text block very clean with 14 illustrations.
- This is a very interesting book, because it sets out a very comprehensive set of cookery and hygiene lessons with sound practical domestic advice. Even with the duties of a Nurse and the diet of a nursery tackled. Also included, a fascinating history of how edible torulea yeast was discovered and used. A look at the index gives a great insight into a completely different age for women. Since the advent of mass food productions, supermarkets etc, this is less of a cookery book and more of highly pragmatic domestic history book. In researching this book and the author I came across online, this article from the Thoresby Historical Society founded in 1889. I wanted to try to reduce it somewhat, but after reading it, I decided to reprint the whole article as a small homage to Catherine Buckton. -- "In 1870 the ground-breaking Elementary Education Act gave all children the right to education up to age thirteen. School Boards were set up in all the major cities with the urgent task of providing places for all the children who had never had regular schooling – some twenty thousand in Leeds alone. Elections were held for membership of the Board, and for the first time women were allowed to stand for public office. There was bitter competition in Leeds for the fifteen seats, split by religious, political and class loyalties. Two women boldly entered the fray as Liberal candidates. Neither won a place, but for Catherine Mary Buckton it was the start of her long fight for educational opportunity and child welfare. She was the wife of Joseph Buckton, a prosperous Leeds wool and cloth merchant, living in a comfortable house overlooking Woodhouse Moor. Brought up in London and Wales, the daughter of a doctor, part of a large lively family with distinguished connections in science, philosophy and politics, she was well aware of the desperate living conditions and high death rates of the great industrial cities like Leeds and the urgent need for public health reform. She was already an active member of the Ladies’ Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education, so she was well-informed and at this stage of her life, in her forties with her two children nearly grown-up, she was ready for a challenge. She believed a key approach was through the education of girls, the wives and mothers of the future. Determined to stand again for the Board at the next election in 1873, she agreed meanwhile to run a series of evening courses for working women in Holbeck and Wortley on health, food and hygiene. Knowing most of her audience would be illiterate, she created simple diagrams and experiments to illustrate her points. Her talks proved very popular, not least because of her understanding and empathy with her listeners. She heard many disturbing tales of the superstitions and ignorance which contributed to infant deaths, and she gained insight into the terrible, demoralising conditions many working women lived in. She was encouraged to publish an account of her ‘painful but delightful’ experience, the first step in what was to become a highly successful writing career. In 1873 she won election to the Board, and was to remain the only woman member until her retirement in 1882, on occasion topping the poll. She proved a combative and articulate campaigner for girls to be taught cookery and the principles of health and hygiene, and went round schools herself to give practical lessons and demonstrations. She designed a special cupboard with all the equipment needed for cookery lessons in the schoolroom and helped to set up training schemes for teachers. Through her work Leeds won a national reputation as a leader in health education. Meanwhile she continued to write and publish, promoting her ideas. Her books ‘Health in the House’, ‘Food and Home Cookery’ and ‘Our Dwellings, Healthy and Unhealthy’, fully illustrated and clearly written, were widely read across the country, not only by women, and reprinted many times. Her love of nature and concern for the many Leeds children who had no access to gardens led her to institute an annual School Board competition for children to plant and exhibit window boxes, with hundreds of children taking part each year. Her book on this subject, ‘Town and Window Gardening’ (1879) was another popular success, and contributed to her national reputation, winning praise from Prime Minister Gladstone himself. A strong Unitarian, she remained throughout her time on the School Board a supporter of free secular education and religious freedom. Sensitive to the needs and problems of the poor, she was a vociferous fighter on their part in various battles. When she retired in 1882 she published a review of the Board’s work, with a powerful critique of penny-pinching attitudes to education. She believed in the need to provide a sound education for all children, whatever the cost – taxes should be spent on that, she declared, rather than ‘wicked, senseless wars’. She retired to London with her family and published one further book ‘Comfort and Cleanliness’ in 1894. She remained a strong believer in women’s rights and a keen advocate for women’s suffrage and equal work opportunities. She died in 1904, and a scholarship in her name was founded by her sister at Abadare Hall for women in Cardiff. Her work still resonates today, with its stress on healthy eating, good childcare, and the need to enjoy and protect the natural world". -- Even though this book will never find its place as a valued item on the shelves of a good cookery book collection, it should find a much more comfortable place in any collection of great people and unsung heroes. Remarkable.!

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11248

Burton.   George F.    
Chocolates & Bon-bons
THE "NEW AREA" CHOCOLATE BOOK Home Made Chocolates Bon-Bons : Desserts Fine Art Sugar Work Sugar confectionery in General including Up-to-date Con-tinental Novelties & Finest Specialities &c. &c. COPYRIGHT BY GEORGE F. BURTON Gold Medallist, Author of "Cake-Making," etc.
FIRST EDITION. Circa 1924. 4to. 2feps. [1] Frontispiece of b&w photograph of George F. Burton. Title page. [1] 1pp Contents. 1pp Preface. 5-149. [1] 5pp Index. 1pp Illustrations. 2pp Advertisements. 1fep. Dated on the Preface; Blackpool 1924. Tan cloth covers and spine with black blind stamped writing. With an embossed round medallion of a chocolate on gilt on the front cover.A small 1" tear at the top of the spine. Some very light water-stains on the back cover. Full page illustrations in monochrome and many more in wonderful vivid colours. Some in-text illustrations as well. Overall a very handsome copy of a rare book.
- This book of confectionery is a fabulous piece of self-promotion by Burton. He proclaims himself on the Title page and Preface as a -- Gold Medallist and author of world famed book "Cake Making, Icing and Breads" Whatever Burton's self-belief, this is a very nice professional Chocolatier's and Confectioner's book of the time, made all the more attractive by the twelve beautiful lithograph plates.

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Modern category
ref number: 11005

CAIRD.   JOHN     - Caird's progresssive cookery book.
THE COMPLETE CONFECTIONER and FAMILY COOK;
including MANY VALUABLE RECEIPTS, and ample directions for MARKETING, TRUSSING CARVING, &C. the whole being the result of MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE. (a double horizontal line) By J. CAIRD. (a double horizontal line) Illustrated with copperplates and woodcuts. Edinburgh: PRINTED FOR JOHN ANDERSON; AND SOLD BY LONGMAN, HURST, REES, & ORMEE, LONDON and WOGAN & CUMMING, DUBLIN. 1809.
FIRST EDITION: Octavo. 204mm x 120mm. 2 feps. [1] Engraved frontispiece on verso. Tittle page. Verso printer's details. (1)iv-vi Preface. (1)2-445. (1)447-454 Index. 2feps. Text block slightly dusted with original rough paper edges. Some pages have light foxing. Overall in good condition. 7 engraved plates. in-text illustrations. 1/4 size brown leather spine with gilt text and lines. Original paper boards with nice dark brown patina.
- In the Preface, Caird informs that the book is in three parts; the first is Confectionary, the second to Pastry, Baking and Pickling and the third relates to Cookery. It includes many recipes for still popular Scottish sweets, oat cakes, bannocks, shortbread, barley sugar, apple dumplings, and apple fritters, as well as recipes such as macaroni and cheese. John Caird was a grocer and confectioner based in Edinburgh, known for his internationally imported fruits and spices. This work is notable for containing the first known recipe for marmalade ice cream. Also, Caird shows his professionalism by having a separate and precise ingredient list attached to recipess, albeit in large quantities, which no doubt reflects his shop production rather than being geared just for the housewife. A good copy of a very scarce book.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11104

Careme.   Maria Antonin     - A 2nd edition in the original state.
LE CUISINIER PARISIEN,
OU L’ART DE LA CUISINE FRANCAISE AU DIX-NEUVIEME SIECLE, TRAITE ELEMENTAIRE ET PRATIQUE DES ENTREES FROIDES, DES SOCLES ET DE L’ENTREMETS DE SUCRE, SUIVI D’OBSERVATIONS UTILES AUX PROGRES DE CES DEUX PARTIES DE LA CUISINE MODERNE. Par M. A. Careme, de Paris, Auteur du Patissier royalparisien, du Patissier pittoresque, du Maitre- d’hotel francais, et de deux Recueils de prjects d’ architecture destines aux embellissements de Paris et de Saint-Petersbourg. Deuxieme Edition, revue, corrigee et augmentee. OUVRAGE ORNE DE 25 PLANCHES DESSINEES PAR L’AUTEUR, ET GRAVEES AU TRAIT PAR MM. NORMAND FILS, HIBON ET THIERRY. PARIS, DE L’IMPRIMERIE DE FIRMIN DIDOT, IMPRIMEUR DU ROI, RUE JACOB, NO 24. 1828.
212x 135mm. 1 fep stuck to cover. Half title with bookplate of Alain Huchet. 1p list of Careme’s published titles with his facsimile signature. Engraved title page. [1] Extra title page. [1] 2p Memoire de Laguipiere. (1)8-9 Avant Propos. [1] (1)12-46 Discours Preliminaire. (1)48 – 407. [1] (1)410 – 422 Table des Chapitres. ½ fep pasted to the inside of the back cover. The original engraved blue cover with a small 3mm chip on the bottom of the spine and the corner of the back cover. A small amount of light foxing here and there, but overall nice and clean. Pages untrimmed and some uncut. A very nice copy of a very scarce edition in the original state.
- French Cuisine is one of the most refined styles of cooking in the world. It is a consequence of centuries of political and social change throughout the country. It wasn't until the year 1765 that restaurants in France could make and sell food. Up until this point foods to be sold had to be purchased from the food guilds. A tavern owner named Boulanger who served soups, challenged the guilds in court and won. Boulanger called these soups - restaurants, also known as restoratives, and will be forever credited with the term we all use today. French cuisine also owes its basis to its great regional seasonal foods and famous dishes. From the German & Swiss influences of the east, to the sublime produce of Provence, the Mediterranean seafood, the bounty of the middle regions, the influence of Paris and the butter and cream dishes of the north. It also has a highly refined and historic Viniculture and the well-developed variety of the cheese industry. French cuisine is blessed. Many of the great chefs of France worked for royalty, dukes and the noble families. With the French revolution and the fall of the monarchy, many chefs were out of jobs. With Restaurant owners able to make and sell their own food many of these great chefs opened their own restaurants. Ten years later there were more than 500 eating establishments in and around Paris alone, never mind the rest of France. Many of these great master chefs refined their cooking to a point we now know as Classical French Cuisine. The three most important of these chefs were Francois Pierre de la Varenne, who wrote the first book on French Cuisine, refining a lot of techniques. Marie Antoine Careme helped create some and to record the majority of classical cuisine's techniques and recipes. Finally and perhaps the most influential - was George Auguste Escoffier, whose work and books are still today arguably the most important references in the world of French classical cuisine. Antonin Careme was the archetype of the great modern chef. Of the role he saw cookery fulfilling in society, he wrote; ‘When there is no more good cooking in the world, there will be no more keen and elevated intelligence, no pleasing relationships, no more social unity’. Those ideas were extraordinarily new at the time, and part of his culinary testament in this volume here; ‘Le Cuisinier Parisien ou l’Art de la Cuisine au XIX Seicle’. Careme was a conscientious recorder of everything he undertook in the Kitchen. He was always taking notes. He wrote “It was my custom every evening, on returning home, to note down the changes I made to my work as a result of my daily experience. That daily account was the cause of the progress I made”. Careme goes further - “ My colleagues now see the clear evidence of the progress I have made in the French cuisine of the 19th century. I do not claim that this new work of mine will fix the culinary art for ever; other practitioners with the gifts and skill for it will doubtless create new things, but my work will have inspired them”. And how right he was ! Gastronomy – a word that had only recently been penned by the author Joseph Berchoux, was to mature beyond recognition. Francatelli (one of Careme's pupils) Gouffe, Dubois, Nignon, Ritz and above all Escoffier, were to shape and record the new heights and standards in which Gastronomy was taken. The legacy of Careme is firmly embedded in this history and his books are collected assiduously. Alain Huchet whose bookplate is tipped into this book is an ex-Chef de Cuisine who became a famous antiquarian bookseller on the Quai de Conti in Paris. He also specialises in prints as well as books and has a very large collection of Larousse Gastronomiques.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11176