Tillinghast & M.H.   Mary     - Two books bound in one
THE YOUNG COOKS Monitor;
OR DIRECTIONS FOR Cookery and Distilling, BEING A Choice Compendium of Excellent Receipts. Made Publick for the Use and Benifit of my Scholars. The THIRD EDITION with Large ADDITIONS. By M.H. LONDON: Printed for the Author, at her House in Limestreet. 1705. --- BOUND WITH: Rare and Excellent RECEIPTS. Experienc'd, and Taught By Mrs Mary Tillinghast. And now Printed for the Use of her Scholars only. LONDON, Printed in the Year, 1690.
12mo. 2fep. Title page. 2pp. Epistle preface, signed M.H. (9-180) 2nd Title page. (1-30) 2fep. Nicely bound in contemporary full mottled tan calf with gilt lines and fillet on boards. Spine with raised bands, gilt lines, red label with gilt lettering. Clean internally with very light ageing and minor worming to some pages without loss of text. A very rare item.
- The first edition of the 'Young Cook's Monitor' was printed 1683. Oxford states that the 2nd edition of 1690 has an appendix. This third edition of 1705 also has an appendix. The second book; Tillinghast's 'Rare and Excellent Receipts' was first printed in 1678. This copy is the second of 1690. In Oxford's 'Notes from a Collector's Catalogue' he writes on page 87, that both his and the BM's copies of Tillinghast's book are also bound with the 'Young Cook's Monitor' There is also a surprising similarity between these 2 books bound in one volume, and the anonymous work, 'The True Way'. (item, #10962 on this site under 'Anon') The three books and receipts are remarkably similar with the three Title pages all proclaiming they are 'Made Publick for the Use and Benefit of my Scholars.' The Epistle Directories of both books have the same similar statement addressed to her Scholars. (There is no Epistle Directory in Tillinghast's book). The 'True Way' does not have any indication of authorship, while the 'Cook's Monitor' has M.H. after the preface. This compiler suggests that Mary Tillinghast is the maiden name of the M.H. of the 'Young Cooks Monitor'. I suggest that sometime after writing/publishing her 'Excellent Receipts' in 1678, Mary Tillinghast married and assumed her married initials of M.H. while keeping the authorship of 'The True Way' anonymous. At this point in time there is no way to prove this theory, but the startling similarities between the three works (bound in two volumes) are too evident to ignore. Further reference can be found in the 'The Recipes Project' online that informs: The British Library copies of the Tillinghast and second edition of the Young Cooks Monitor were bound together, sometime during the 19th century: BL shelf-marks C.189.aa.10 (1) and (2).

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10960

Tissot.   DR.     - First English edition 1776.
ADVICE TO PEOPLE IN GENERAL.
WITH Respect to their Health: Translated form the French Edition of Dr. Tissot's 'Avis au People'. &c. Printed at Lyons; with all his Notes; also a few of his medical Editor's at Lyons; and several occa-sional Notes adapted to this English Translation, By a PHYSICIAN. WITH A Table of the most cheap, yet effectual Reme-dies, and the plainest Directions for preparing them readily. (enclosed in 3 long thin lines) IN TWO VOLUMES.- In the Multitude of the People is the Honour of a King; and for the Want of People cometh the Destruction of the Prince. Prov. xiv.28. - VOL.1. (a long double-thick line) EDINBURGH: Printed by A. Donaldson, and sold at his shops in London and Edinburgh. (a short double-thick line) MDCCLXV1. VOLUME 11. Same Title page.
2 x 12mo. 172 x 110 mm. VOL.1 - 2 feps. Title page. [1] (1) - vi Authors Dedication. Lausanne, Dec.3. 1762. (1)viii - x The Contents. (1)xii - xxi Preface. [1] (1)2 - 27 Introduction. [1] (1)29 - 271. Verso Publishers adverts. 2 feps. - VOL.11. 2 feps. Title page. [1] (1) - vi The Contents. (1)2 - 318. 2 feps. Both volumes in full brown calf with nice patina. Gilt tooling in three compartments. Text blocks with good thick paper. A little light edge staining on both title pages with no loss. Overall fine condition.
- Dr Tissot originally had his books published at Zurich in German by Messrs: Heidegger. Then thereafter a second French edition in Paris, followed by a third at Rotterdam. Sometime later an Italian edition was published. It must have been a popular work. The list of contents appears to cover all types of ailments, both male and female. An interesting read, but definitely of its time.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11287

Toklas   Alice B.     - With a rare signed presentation inscription from the Author.
Cook Book
ILLUSTRATIONS BY SIR FRANCIS ROSE. (Printers device of a mermaid) London. MICHAEL JOSEPH
FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 1954. 8vo. 235 x 157 mm. Illustrated cartographic front paste-down and end-paper. [1] Half title. On verso is a tipped-in book-review card from the publisher Messers. Michael Joseph Ltd. 1 blank with signed presentation inscription from the author in her typical shaky script - "For Jacques Ehrmann - The perhaps youngest of the admirers of Gertrude Stein to cross my path? With all good wishes, Alice Toklas". Frontispiece drawing of Toklas. Title page. Printers info. page. 1p Contents. [1] ix-xi A Word with Cook. [1] (2)3-280. (2)283-288 Index of Recipes. 2fep. [1] Illustrated cartographic back end-paper and paste-down. Cream coloured cloth boards. Spine with gilt and green cloth label. Distinctive D/J with large coloured drawing of Toklas, the back with fruit filled vine. The spine with 7mm chip to the top spreading to a 1/4 of the back, and 5mm bottom of spine chip. Very lightly age-browned & very slightly chipped at edges, but looks fresh. Text block very clean. Illustrated throughout by Francis Rose. Internally very good.
- - The person who received this inscribed copy from Toklas was Jacques Ehrmann (1931 - 1972). A French theorist and faculty member at Yale. He would have been 24 in 1955. What is unusual also is the publisher's book-review card tipped into the verso of the title page and opposite the signed presentation to Jacques Ehrmann. It states that the book was sold for 21 shillings (old UK money) and published on the 15th November 1954. One wonders whether this was a book given initially to Toklas from Michael Joseph and she signed it and gave it to Mr Ehrmann, or was it sent to Ehrmann by the publisher who in turn did an official review and then got it signed by Toklas. A mystery! Alice Babette Toklas was born in San Francisco, California into a middle-class Jewish family and attended schools in both San Francisco and Seattle. For a short time she also studied music at the University of Washington. She went to Paris and met Gertrude Stein an American writer, on September 8, 1907 on the first day that she arrived. Together they hosted a famous salon at 27 rue de Fleurus that attracted expatriate American writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, Paul Bowles, Thornton Wilder and Sherwood Anderson, and avant-garde painters, including Picasso, Matisse and Braque. Acting as Stein's confidante, lover, cook, secretary, muse, editor, critic, and general organizer, Toklas remained a background figure, chiefly living in the shadow of Stein, until Stein published her memoirs in 1933 under the teasing title The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. It became Stein's bestselling book. The two were a couple until Gertrude Stein's death in 1946. Toklas then published her own literary memoir, this 1954 book that mixed reminiscences and recipes. The most famous recipe therein (actually contributed by her friend Brion Gysin) is called "Haschich Fudge", a mixture of fruit, nuts, spices, and ‘canibus [sic] sativa’, or marijuana. Her name was later lent to the range of cannabis concoctions called Alice B. Toklas brownies. Some believe that the slang term toke, meaning to inhale marijuana, is derived from her last name. The cookbook has not been out of print since it was first published, and has been translated into numerous languages, most recently into Norwegian in 2007. A second cookbook followed in 1958 called 'Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present' [see item # 11335 below]. She also wrote articles for several magazines and newspapers including The New Republic and the New York Times, In 1963 she published her autobiography, 'What Is Remembered', which abruptly ends with Stein's death, leaving little doubt that Stein was the love of her lifetime. Her later years were very difficult because of poor health and financial problems, aggravated by the fact that Stein's heirs took the priceless paintings (some of them by Picasso) which had been left to her by Stein. Toklas also became a Roman Catholic convert in her old age as she had been told by a priest that in that way she may possibly meet Stein again in the afterlife. She died in poverty at the age of 89, and is buried next to Stein in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France; Toklas' name is engraved on the back of Stein's headstone. This very scarce famous cookery book is made very rare with Toklas's signed inscription.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11098

TOKLAS.   ALICE B.     A rare signed presentation inscription from the Author.
Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present.
PRESENT (small printer's device) Alice B. Toklas WITH INTRODUCTION AND COMMENTS BY POPPY CANNON (small printer's device) HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK
FIRST EDITION. 1958. 215x145 mm 1fep with signed inscription " For Patricio and John Lucas - In friendship - Beautifully Alice". [1] Half-title. [1] Title page. Verso with K-H to printer's details. 1p Contents. [1] vii-xxiii Introduction by Poppy Cannon. [1] xxv-xxvi Preface. Another Half-title. [1] 1-160 161-164 Index. 1fep. Near fine D/J with 1x5mm small chip. Price-clipped. Quarter red cloth spine with gilt lettering. Blue paper covers. On the bottom of the front inside cover under the d/j is a tipped-in simple book-plate of JOHN S. LUCAS. Text block as new.
- Toklas's 'Aromas and Flavors' was her second cookbook following the huge popularity of her 'Cook Book' pub: 1954. (see item # 11098 above). In Poppy Cannon's introduction, she describes the rich years of Toklas's and Gertrude Stein's close relationship as one in which Miss Stein wrote and talked, while Miss Toklas cooked and talked. It appears, by Toklas's output of two cookery books, that she also inherited some of Stein's skills. She is also praised by Cannon for being steeped in the traditions of classic French cuisine and a great respect for seventeenth-century gastronomy. A scan of the recipes throws up some unusual dishes: An intriguing Ham & Oyster pie, a diet defying Sweetbread Salad, a humble Sauerkraut with Pig's Trotter, a Duck with Delicate Aspic to be served in candlelight, possibly with Cabbage Pancakes to accompany. One other recipe to catch the eye is Puff Pastry made with Olive Oil instead of butter. One gets a sense of a very serious cook who does a lot of research and is attracted to eccentric dishes. One can imagine the constant company of great artists such as Picasso, Matisse et al, that she and Gertrude Stein regularly entertained, in whom the norm is anything but; therefore one sees in her interesting and unusual cook book the gastronomic norm that the eccentric but creative Toklas embraces. No other recipe in her book personifies this but the "Kidneys in Champagne'. Recommended firstly to use pig or veal kidneys, but failing this, instead of purchasing the nicer tasting Lamb kidneys she recommends Chicken Livers. One can see the influence of early French cuisine that one senses Toklas had a great respect for and she seriously tries to offer this in her cook book. A noble effort. This is initially a very scarce Toklas 2nd title made rare, as no other signed copy has been traced nor appeared in auction.

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Information

Modern category
ref number: 11335

Trusler.   Rev. Dr John     - Pierre Koffmann's bookplate. A signed letter from Trusler.
The Honours of The Table
OR, Rules for Behaviour during Meals; WITH THE WHOLE ART OF CARVING, Illustrated by a Variety of Cuts. TOGETHER WITH Directions for going to Market, and the Method of distinguishing good Provisions from bad; TO WHICH IS ADDED A Number of Hints or concise Lessons for the improvement of Youth, on all Occasions in Life. By the Author of PRINCIPLES of POLITENESS, &c.&c. A paragraph of 'Lord Chesterfields Letters' FOR THE USE OF YOUNG PEOPLE. The Third Edition. BATH, PRINTED BY G. ROBBINS, FOR THE AUTHOR; And sold by J. Brockwell, No. 7, Great Carter-lane. Doctor's Commons; and Byfield and Co. Charing Cross, London. 1803.
THE THIRD EDITION. 12mo. 1fep with Koffmann's bookplate. Title Page. Pp.2-67. Contents 67-72. 1fep. Twenty six engraved and bordered woodcuts of carving throughout the text. Fully bound in contemporary mid brown tree calf with nice patina. Spine with faded gilt lines. Internally very clean. Also enclosed is a folded one page hand written and signed letter from Trusler to Mr Phillips, Bookseller in St. Paul's Churchyard, discussing literary matters, including a subscription to "a 4to Edition of my Memoirs if it could be managed, & to print no more than are subscribed for - would you like to subscribe for the whole edition?". 1p. 175x230mm. Trimmed at head but complete with a central filing hole. In fine condition. With a later annotation at the bottom of the page. Under Trusler's signature - Bath, April 11 1805. When Trusler moved to Bath he published the first part of his rambling and anecdotal 'Memoirs of the Life of the Rev. Dr. Trusler. 1806. According to Lowndes he regretted its publication and tried to suppress it by destroying all the copies that he could find. The manuscript of the second part of his memoirs is now in the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.
- In this age of pre-sliced spiral hams and supermarket meat parts, most hosts, when faced with the job of carving at the table a large fore-rib of beef, a leg of lamb, a loin of pork or small game birds etc etc, fret and falter, unsure of where to make the first cut. This is an ancient anxiety. The Reverend Dr. John Trusler, in this work ‘The Honours of the Table’, writes of the painful "spectacle of a host, hacking for half an hour across a bone, greasing himself, and bespattering the company with the sauce". The art of carving, once the domain of only a skilled few Maître d'hotels, heads of household, and dilettante hosts is now almost completely lost. It is a tradition worth reviving though, if only so that we may regain our confidence and composure at the holiday or festive table. Trusler wrote: "Where the master or mistress of a table dissects a roast with ease and grace…they are not only well thought of, but admired." Trusler also dispenses some quirky advice. Young diners are advised to "pass no joke without a sting (punch-line)", "never pride yourself on being a wag, take no snuff, chew no tobacco", and "be not dark or mysterious" Some of the references are more obscure - women are advised: "Be cautious of un-bosooming yourself at table, particularly to a married woman." He also gives curious information as to the habits of the time. For example, the customs of 'a gentleman and a lady sitting alternately around the table' had only lately been introduced. Till then the ladies and gentlemen sat together according to rank. It also states - 'Habit has made a pint of wine after dinner almost necessary to a man who eats freely.' John Trusler is described by his DNB biographer as "eccentric, divine, literary compiler, and medical empiric." At the behest of his father he took holy orders and was curate to various parishes through much of his life; he said that in making him a clergyman, his father had spoiled a good layman. His clerical duties, however, were not an obstacle to participation in myriad civil activities: he established an academy for teaching oratory, studied medicine in Leiden, superintended the Literary Society, sold sermons to the clergy in England and Ireland to save them the trouble of writing their own, and established a successful printing and book-selling business. He also wrote books on a wide variety of subjects, including works on language and grammar, an edition of Hogarth, a very popular adaption of Chesterfield's 'Letters,' a work on practical husbandry and farming, a book on long life and many more. His 'Honors of the Table' ran to five editions. This thin volume is from the library of the well known chef, Pierre Koffmann. He was Patron and Chef de Cuisine of his famous Michelin starred restaurant -- 'La Tante Claire' on Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea, and now owned by Gordon Ramsey under a different name. Koffmann's bookplate on the inside cover is rather simple and gauche. The late Mike McKirdy of 'Cookbooks' related a story about Kaufmann's cookery books when they came up for sale at Auction. The books did not have any proof they came from the collection of such a distinguished and famous Chef. The auction house did not have much time to produce anything so ended up with Mike McKirdy's suggestion of the plump turkey on a hastily produced and photo-copied image, and used as a bookplate for the auction items. As such, I guess they give some distinction to those particular books. The hand written signed letter from Trusler though, makes this item altogether much rarer.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10948

Tryon.   Thomas     - Very rare.
The Good Houswife made a Doctor,
Or, Health's choice and sure friend: Being a Plain Way of Nature's own prescribing, to Prevent & Cure Most Diseases to Men, Women and Children, by Diet and Kitchen Physick only, being an Appendix to the Book entitled , The Way to Health, & or, a further demonstration of Philosophy therein contained. With some Remarks on the Practice of Physick and Chymistry. By Philotheos Physiologue, The Author of The Way to Health, Long Life and Happiness. The Country-Man's Companion etc. London, Printed and Sold by Andrew Sowle, in Holloway-Lane, near Shoreditch.
FIRST EDITION. Circa 1688. Title page. 6pp Preface. 4pp Contents. 1-232. 6pp Advertisements. Pages evenly light browned with age throughout with some small staining occasionally. Page corners rounded. Full dark brown modern calf with blind tooling to boards and spine with brown label and gilt lettering. New end papers.
- Although Tryon did not put his name nor date on this book it is easy to place it due to the declaration on the title page -- 'being an Appendix to the Book entitled , The Way to Health, & or, a further demonstration of Philosophy therein contained----'. The 1st edition of The Way to Health is 1683. Oxford states 'n/d' for the 1st edition of The Good Houswife, with a 2nd of 1692 on which Tryon's name first appears. Assuming Tryon took five years to write this supplement, we can place it's date at circa 1688. Tryon was a prolific writer of books on food and diet and also advocated vegetarianism. Oxford lists a total of 10 various titles under Tryon. Both books mentioned here are very rare items.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10945

Tryon.   Thomas     - Very rare.
The Way to HEALTH, LONG Life and Happiness;
Or,A Discourse of TEMPERANCE, And the Particular Nature of all Things requisite for the Life of Man; As, All sorts of Meats, Drinks, Air, Exercise, &c. with special Directions how to use each of them to the best Advantage of the BODY and MIND. Shewing form the ground of Nature, Treatise of most sorts of ENGLISH HERBS, With several other remarkable and most useful Observa-tions, very necessary for all Families. The whole Trea-tise displaying the most hidden secrets of Philosophy, and made easie and familiar to the meanest Capacities, by various Examples and Demonstrances.The like never before Published. Communicated to the World for a general Good, By THOMAS TRYON, Student in PHYSICK. The Second Edition, with Amendments. LONDON; Printed by H.C. for R. Baldwin, near the Ox-ford-Arms in Warwick-Lane, 1691.
8vo. Title Page. 4pp To the Reader. 8pp The Contents. 1-500. [2] 1-18. Pages lightly age browned though-out. Contemporary dark brown calf boards with nice patina. Spine relaid in sympathetic dark brown calf with blind tooled lines with a dark brown label with gilt lettering. Overall a nice copy of a rare item.
- Thomas Tryon (1634-1703) English humanitarian: Born in the bucolic village of Bibury, Gloucestershire. At the age of 18 he left Bibury without telling his parents and travelled on foot to London with £3 savings, where he became a hatter, and also in his youth, a spinner and a shepherd. He had no formal education but taught himself to read and write. He eventually went on to write many books on vegetarianism, health, wealth, slavery, education, abstinence from alcohol and tobacco also advocating animal rights. He lived a very ascetic life even though married, eventually becoming a prosperous merchant. 'The Way to Health' became his best known book and after publication he toured and lectured on it in the United States. The book much impressed Benjamin Franklin, who followed some of its tenets and often quoted from. He had a horror of war, and was shocked by the cruelty of slavery which he saw at first hand when he travelled to Barbados. In the last two decades of his life he published 27 works on a wide range of subjects. His dietary ideas were largely plagiarised by Joseph Ritson in his Essay on Abstinence from Animal Food, published in 1802. Playwright Aphra Behn, and Percy Bysshe Shelley were also advocates of Tyron's writings. A supplement to this book called 'The Good Houswife Made A Doctor' (item 10945 on this site) was published after the publication of the first edition of 1683. Cagle 1028; MacLean pp.142/3; Oxford, p.43 (in a note); see Wing T3181.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 10963

Tusser.   Thomas     - A popular Tudor work.
Tusser Redivivus:
Being part of Five Hundred POINTS of HUSBANDRY; DIRECTING What Corn, Grass, &c. is proper to be sown; What Trees to be Planted; How Land is to be Improved: with what ever is fit to be done for the Benefit of the Farmer in every Month of the Year. To which is added NOTES and OBSERVATIONS explaining many obsolete Terms in the said Mr Tusser, and what is agreeable to the present Practice in several Counties of this Kingdom. A WORK very necessary and useful for Gentlemen, as well as Farmers and Occupiers of Land, whether Wood-Ground, Tillage or Pasture. [a fine straight line] LONDON: Printed, and are to be sold by J. Morphew near Stationers-Hall. 1720. [the whole page with neat double-line border].
190.5 x 127 mm. Twelve monthly parts in eleven (as published, with November and December on the last title page). 1 new fep. Main Title page. [1] January - Title page, Preface on the verso, 3-16 and separate pagination. February - Title page. 3-16 and separate pagination. March - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. April - Title page [1]. 3-16 and separate pagination. May - Title page [1]. 3-16 and separate pagination. June - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. July - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. August - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. September - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. October- Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. November and December - Title page. 2-16 and separate pagination. 1page Advertisement. 1 new fep. The Title page has a small repair at the top of the page with no loss. Illustrated with fine large woodcut vignettes in each chapter. (the first 4 vignettes very nicely and pleasingly coloured in yellow). The whole text block is slightly age-browned and clean. Nicely bound in modern full tan calf with raised bans on the spine, with a red calf label and gilt lettering. Overall very good complete copy.
- First printed in 1557, this book has a charming format, giving instructions on farming in England throughout the year. An early adherent of seasonality, Tusser's writing is both witty and informative. His major work was first the ‘Hundredth Good Pointes of Husbandrie’, published by Richard Tottel and frequently reprinted. Tottel published an enlarged edition ‘Five Hundreth Pointes of Good Husbandrie’ in 1573. Tusser includes a homely mix of instructions and observations about farming and country customs which offer a fascinating insight into life in Tudor England, and his work records many terms and proverbs in print for the first time (eg: A fool and his money are soon parted). In this work, he also famously presents ten characteristics the perfect cheese must have: --- "Not like Gehazi, i.e., dead white, like a leper. Not like Lot's wife, all salt. Not like Argus, full of eyes. Not like Tom Piper, "hoven and puffed". Not like Crispin, leathery. Not like Lazarus, poor. Not like Esau, hairy. Not like Mary Magdalene, full of whey or maudlin. Not like the Gentiles, full of maggots. Not like a Bishop, made of burnt milk". --- The work is written in verse in Gothic script and takes the form of a calendar with instructions in normal script to the farmer on what he should be doing in each month. In August there is a page on the gathering and storing of hops which were only introduced in the early 16th century but are here referred to as a common crop. As well as the growing, care and harvesting of crops and animals, there is advice to the house-wife on the care of foodstuffs. (In the 1744 edition there is a section on ‘Houswifery’ which runs from pages 119 – 138). Thomas Tusser had a very varied life. His father William and his mother Isabella had as well as Thomas, four other sons, Clement, Andrew, John and William, and four daughters; the marriages of the daughters are recorded, but no wives assigned to the sons. Thomas was born at Rivenhall near Kelvedon and Witham, in the County of Essex, about the year 1525. The exact date of his birth is uncertain. At a very early age he was placed by his father as a singing-boy in the Collegiate Chapel of the Castle of Wallingford, in Berkshire. Thomas himself recorded in his homely and quaint style the hardships which he had to endure at this school; the bare robes, the college fare, the stale bread, and the penny ale. Later he was impressed into the choir for the King's Chapel. After this he was admitted to the choir of St. Paul’s Cathedral. From St. Paul's he was sent to Eton, probably in 1540 or 1541, "to learn the Latin phrase," From Eton he passed on to Cambridge, and was elected to King's College in 1543. Being obliged by a long illness to discontinue his studies, he left the University, and joined the Court as a retainer of William, Lord Paget, by whom he was probably employed as a musician, and of whom he spoke in terms of praise and affection. After ten years he retired into the country, married and settled down as a farmer at Cattiwade, a hamlet in the parish of Brantham in Suffolk, where he wrote the first edition of this work. He never remained long in one place. For his wife's health, he removed to Ipswich. After her death, he married again, and farmed for some time at West Dereham. He then became a singing man again in Norwich Cathedral, where he found a good patron in the dean, John Salisbury. After another experiment in farming at Fairstead, Essex, he moved once again to London, whence he was driven by the plague of 1572–1573 to find refuge at Trinity Hall, being matriculated as a servant of the college in 1573. At the time of his death he was in possession of a small estate at Chesterton, Cambridgeshire, and his will proves that he was not, as has sometimes been stated, in poverty of any kind, but had in some measure the thrift he preached. Tusser died on 3 May 1580 at the age of about 55. An erroneous inscription at Manningtree, Essex, asserts that he was 65 years old. According to John Stow's Survey of London, Cheape Ward, Thomas Tusser was buried in the now lost church of St Mildred in the Poultry. The inscription on his tomb there was as follows: "Here Thomas Tusser, clad in earth, doth lie, That sometime made the pointes of Husbandrie; By him then learne thou maiest; here learne we must, When all is done, we sleepe, and turne to dust: And yet, through Christ, to Heaven we hope to goe; Who reades his bookes, shall find his faith was so." Cagle - A Matter of Taste, p1034-1035. Bitting - Gastronomic Bibliography, p468. Lehman - The British Housewife, P29. Pollard & Redgrave – STC 1475 to 1640, p568-569 showing 20 editions up to 1638.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11247

Ude.   Louis Eustache     - A nice copy in the original state.
The French Cook.
A SYSTEM OF FASHIONABLE AND ECONOMICAL COOKERY, FOR THE USE OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. "True taste is an excellent economist." - Rogers. BY LOUIS EUSTACHE UDE. CO-DEVANT COOK TO LOUIS XVI. AND THE EARL OF SEFTON, AND LATE STEWARD TO HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF YORK. NINTH EDITION, ENLARGED. LONDON W.H. AINSWORTH, 23, OLD BOND-STREET; SOLD ALSO BY HURST AND CO., ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD; SHERWOOD AND CO., PA-TERNOSTER-ROW; SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, STATIONERS-HALL-COURT; J. ANDREWS, NEW BOND-STREET; AND W. SAMS, ST JAMES'S-STREET; WILSON AND SONS, YORK; H. MOZELY, DERBY; W. AND W. CLARKE, MANCHESTER; G. AND J. ROBINSON, LIVERPOOL; OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH; AND WESTLEY AND TYRRELL, DUBLIN. 1827.
210x130 mm. 12p Advertisments. 1fep. (1)Frontispiece portrait of Ude. (drawn from life by Albert Hoffay). Title page. [1] (1)4 Reviews of Ude's book. (1)vi-xxiv Preface. xxv-xxxviii Advice to Cooks. Eight plates numbered 1-8. (1)2-480. (1)482-496 INDEX. 4p Advertisements (2 pages are an Advertisement of Jarrin's 'Italian Confectioner'). 1fep. Original slightly soiled blue cardboard boards and browned paper spine with printed label. Original untrimmed wide margined pages. Feps and frontis very lightly browned, but internally quite clean and bright. The spine is split but still holding. The back board is almost loose but holding. Housed in a beautiful clam-shell case with modern dark brown half calf and marbled boards. Raised bands to spine with gilt dentelles in the compartments. With a red label with gilt lettering. Overall a very nice copy in its original state. Hence the clam-shell box.
- The vain and extravagant Louis Eustache Ude – born in France circa 1769 died 10th April, 1846. He first published in 1813 his important cookbook ‘The French Cook’. Eustache's career in the Kitchen started with his father who had worked in the kitchens of Louis XVI, where he also got Eustache work as an apprentice.". Ude also worked for Napoleon's mother for 2 years. After arriving in England, he was firstly employed by William Philip Molyneux, the 2nd Earl of Sefton at Croxteth Hall. He stayed in service to the Earl, a well-known gourmet, for almost 20 years. Next, for the Duke of York, George III's second son. After the Duke's passing, Ude was taken on as Maitre d’ Hotel at Crockford's famous gaming club for a starting salary of 1200 pounds a year. The owner and founder, William Crockford, had a very interesting and colourful past. Online information has him as a fishmonger in Fleet Street with a sideline in bookmaking and such small-scale swindles as the three-card trick. He mastered whist, piquet, and cribbage, which consequentially made him rich. He also backed horses, and by 1809 he was a familiar figure at the races, which also brought into contact with the rich and famous. In 1816 he bought a quarter-share in a gambling tavern in St. Jame's, but Crockford realized that this tavern could only have a limited success. He knew that the most popular clubs were so because they were selective, and that if he wanted to compete with them he would have to plan on a much grander scale, and go all out to get the top people as members. So after winning a large sum of money (£100,000, according to one story) either at cards or just by running the gambling establishment, he built in 1827 a luxuriously decorated gambling house at 50 St. James's Street in London, also buying four adjoining houses around the corner. To ensure its social exclusiveness, he organized the place as a club with a regular membership. Crockford's Club, as it was called, quickly became the rage; almost every English celebrity from the Duke of Wellington on down hastened to become a member, as did many ambassadors and other distinguished foreigners. Into this refined atmosphere Ude was brought as maitre'd of the club's exquisite restaurant, where he stayed until 1839. His reputation was made. He offered the best food and the best wines, all provided gratis to the clients. Ude was eventually earning a huge salary of £4000 annually for his services – (the equivalent of £371,000 using the GDP deflator up to 2016). On quitting Crockfords, ironically in a dispute over his pay, he was succeeded by the equally famous chef Charles Elme Francatelli. Gambling houses were illegal at this time. Crockford was regularly charged with operating an illegal club but due to his protection in high circles he was never convicted. As a result of these and other investigations in 1844 by a Parliamentary Select Committee, the Gaming Act 1845 came into being, the principle provision of which was to deem a wager unenforceable as a legal contract. This remained in force until 1 September 2007. Crockford made a series of very poor investments and died on 24 May 1844 leaving little of his considerable fortune to his wife Sarah. The fortunes of Crockfords Club also went downhill immediately after his death; the building went through several hands before emerging with a cleansed reputation as the Devonshire Club. Ude’s vanity was so well known he may have been tickled to know that Mrs Beeton (who in her famous book, tried to offer cost effective recipes put together by over 2000 recipe researcher’s) offered only one recipe herself – Ude’s wildly expensive Turtle Soup recipe. It is assumed that the first recipe for soufflé appeared in Vincent La Chapelle’s book ‘Le Cuisinier Moderne, 1742. Actually the word soufflé first appeared in English in Ude’s ‘The French Cook’ 1813. The PRB&M Co. informs us - "Byron swiped the names of many of Ude's dishes for use in canto 15, stanzas 62–74 of “Don Juan,” and indeed two of Ude's suggested course progressions for stanza 63 (see p. 426)" - Fascinating ! He was buried at General Cemetery of All Souls, Kensal Green amongst princes and paupers, the great and the good, the famous and the infamous with over 1500 notable personalities -- including over 550 with entries in the Dictionary of National Biography as well as his great compatriot Alexis Soyer. No doubt he would feel at home.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11055

Venner.   Tho.    
VIA RECTA AD Vitam Longam.
OR, A Treatise wherein the right way and best manner of living for attaining to a long and healfull life, is clearly demonstrated and punctually applied to every age and constitution of body. Much nore enlarged than the former Impressions. By THO. VENNER Doctor of Physick in Bathe. Whereunto is annexed by the fame Author, A very necessary, and compendius Treatise of the famous Baths of BATHE. WITH A Censure of the Medicinall faculties of the Water of St. Vincents- Rocks neer the City of Bristoll. As also An accurate Treatise concerning TOBACCO. All which are likewise amplified since the former Impressions. LONDON. Printed by James Flesher, for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his Shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet Street. 1650. With a second part -- THE BATHS OF BATHE OR A necessary compendious Treatise concerning the Nature, Use, and Efficacy of those famous Hot-Waters. Published for the benefit of all such as yearely, for their health, resort to those Baths. With an Advertisement of the great utility that cometh to mans body, by the taking of Physick in the Spring, inferred upon a Question moved, concerning the frequency of sickness, and death of people more in that season, than in any other. Whereunto is also annexed a Censure concerning the Water of Saint Vincents rocks near Bristoll, which is in great request and use against the Stone. By To. Venner Doctor of Physick in Bathe. LONDON. Printed by James Flesher for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his shop in Saint Dunstans Churchyard in Fleetstreet, 1650. With a third part -- A Briefe and Accurate TREATISE CONCERNING The taking of the Fume of TOBACCO, Which very many, in these dayes, doe too too licencously use. In which the immoderate, irregular, and unreasonable use therof is reprehended, and the true nature and best manner of using it, perspicuously demonstrated. By TO. VENNER Doctor of Physick in Bathe. LONDON, Printed by James Flesher for Henry Hood, and are to be sold at his shop in Saint Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet Street, 1650
4to. Pp. Title Page. 2pp Preface. 6pp 'The Table' (1-342) There is a mis-pagination of 10 pages. It jumps from page 331 to 342 without loss of text. - THE 2nd PART; Pp. Title page. (345-393) There is a mis-pagination of 9 pages. It jumps from page 382 to 391 without loss of text - THE 3rd PART; Pp. Title Page. (397-417). Fully bound in contemporary brown calf with original boards and blind tooled borders. Original spine with blind tooling, a red label with gilt lettering and lines. The board on one side has split by the spine but still holding strongly due to re-inforced guttering on inside cover. A clean copy with minimal staining. Overall paper quality browned with age, particularly the title page. A scarce item.
- One of the most popular books on regimen of the period, with much information on diet and nutrition. Venner (1577-1660) Physician and writer. Graduated from Oxford in 1599 with a BA, and started as a medical practitioner and later was made a proper MD. He had a practice in Peterton, Bridgewater and Bath. He advocated moderation in smoking, but tears down some of the contemporary superstitions on the evil of the habit. Also, his writings did much to popularize the therapeutic waters of Bath. He was the first to use the word 'obesity' to describe people who are very overweight. In the bibliography ‘Old Cookery Books and Ancient Cuisine’ by William Carew Hazlitt, he brings our attention to Venner’s wide-ranging advice on various meats. “ He was evidently a very intelligent person, and affords us the result of his professional experience and personal observation. He considered two meals a day sufficient for all ordinary people; breakfast at eleven and supper at six (as at the universities); but he thought that children and the aged or infirm could not be tied by any rule. He condemns "bull's beef" as rank, unpleasant, and indigestible, and holds it best for the labourer; which seems to indicate more than anything else the low state of knowledge in the grazier, when Venner wrote: but there is something beyond friendly counsel where our author dissuades the poor from eating partridges, because they are calculated to promote asthma. "Wherefore," he ingenuously says, "when they shall chance to meet with a covey of young partridges, they were much better to bestow them upon such, for whom they are convenient!" Salmon, turbot, and sturgeon he also advises, is hard of digestion, and injurious, if taken to excess; nor does he approve of herrings and sprats; and anchovies he characterises as the meat of drunkards. It is the first that we have heard of them. He was not a bad judge of what was palatable, and prescribes as an agreeable and wholesome meal a couple of poached eggs with a little salt and vinegar, and a few corns of pepper, some bread and butter, and a draught of pure claret. He gives a receipt, possibly the earliest seen in print, for making metheglin or hydromel. He does not object to furmety or junket, or to custards, if they are eaten in the proper seasons, and in the middle or at the end of meals. But he dislikes mushrooms, and advises you to wash out your mouth, and rub your teeth and gums with a dry cloth, after drinking milk. The potato, however, he praises as nutritious and pleasant to the taste, yet, as Gerarde the herbalist also says, flatulent. Venner refers to a mode of sopping them in wine as existing in his time. They were sometimes roasted in the embers, and there were other ways of dressing them. John Forster, of Hanlop, in Bucks, wrote a pamphlet in 1664 to show that the more extended cultivation of this root would be a great national benefit.” - How true! But one wonders just how vocal he would be today when he sees obese children eating daily, large quantities of fried potato chips, loaded with over-used toxic frying oil.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10922