Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - A signed handwritten letter
Addressed to 'Cher Monsieur Cadier'
And signed 'A Escoffier' on Carlton Hotel Stationary.
A 2 page manuscript letter, addressed to Mons. Cadier. On headed paper from the Carlton Hotel, Pall Mall. London. Dated 16 Avril 1918, with the Hotel Crest. The letter was folded in eight with creases, with one line partly obscured but still readable. The whole has been sometime mounted on same coloured card. Also enclosed is a black and white formal group photograph of many of the famous chefs of the day. All contemporaries of Escoffier. They are celebrating some occasion that honors Monsieur Cadier. All the chefs have signed the photograph. Among those present are M. Eugene Herbodeau, one-time protege of Escoffier and also his literary executor, also Auguste Laplanche, Maitre Chef de Cuisine at the Savoy Hotel for many years. Marcel A. Percevault, Maitre Chef de Cuisine of Claridges from 1933-54 is part of the group. Enclosed in a neat marbled cardboard folder with a large label on the front cover. Very rare items.
- In the letter, Escoffier writes in ink ---- [Dear M. Cadier, In our short conversation this evening, I forgot to tell you that over and above the 10 pounds per week you will have 50 pounds gratuity at the end of each year. M.P. informed me of the little remark you made to him on the subject of M.M. Dupont and Carriyer, both of them are good friends and, as you know, they are not particularly well (suffering a little). They have been with me to pass the time waiting for jobs. Officially they have never been sous chefs. With regard to M. Limassin, although I had certain serious reasons for not being satisfied I gave him a post he can be proud of. I believe that in view of the circumstances it is necessary to give you the details. Yours sincerely A Escoffier P.S. If at any time you wish to acquire a post at the Carlton you can take all the time you need to allow you to find someone to replace you thereby not leaving the firm in an embarrassing situation]. -- Adolphe Hypolite Cadier -- 1882 – 1954. A French born chef who spent the major part of his working life in England. On arrival he first worked at Oddenino’s Restaurant, Regent Street, London for a short time in 1910. Cadier also worked 1939-42, at the famous fish restaurant; La Maison Prunier, St James St. London. He is mentioned on page 254 of Madame Prunier's very good book -- La Maison, History of Pruniers. London. 1957. Escoffier was the Maitre Chef de Cuisine of the Carlton Hotel, London from 1899-1919. His concern and care for chefs who had worked under him is well documented. Escoffier himself, in the translation of his own recorded notes in his great grand-daughter-in-law, Laurence Escoffier's book, 'Memories of my Life', states; "During my career I was able to implant 2,000 French chefs all over the world" This letter is a fine indication of that care and tact, for which he was revered. Combined with the signed photograph of a large group of contemporary fellow professionals, very interesting items of pertinent Escoffier ephemera.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 10988

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - A signed handwritten letter
A letter to P. Andrieu, signed by Escoffier.
A two page letter written at his retirement home in Monte-Carlo, 20 November, 1934
Addressed to Monsieur P(ierre) Andrieu, --- Paris. The two pages are covered in Escoffier's handwriting. There is also a one page English translation of the letter. A very clean item. Enclosed in a neat marbled cardboard folder. With a label on the front cover. The letter is from the library of Pierre Orsi, the famous Lyon restuaranteur. A rare item.
- The letter is written one year before Escoffier's death. He writes in a rather shaky hand -- [Dear Sir, I am very surprised that you did not receive my letter which was in answer to yours, whereby you were asking me to write an article for the newspaper "L'action automobile". This article should have been about regional cuisine as seen from the point of view of the chef - Curnonsky treats it from the point of view of the gastronome. Between the chef and Curnonsky there is a wide gap that I do not wish to bridge. Mr Curnonsky speaks as a writer, he is charming and his articles are interesting in places but I have no desire to be the cause of any arguments. To answer your question, I could only do it after reading the article "les princes de la cuisine francaise". Despite all my desire to be agreeable to you and Mr Roussel, it will be impossible for me to do it. I must also tell you that the different regional cuisines do not exist anymore. Ever since all the "regions" have been merged by the advance of the automobile which created easier access from one country to another, we have now in France only one cuisine and that is French Cuisine. -- With deepest regret for not acceding to your wishes, Yours sincerely, A. Escoffier. -- My best wishes to Mr Roussel.] Pierre Andrieu was an author of many articles and books in the domain of wine and gastronomy. He was also a collaborator of Curnonsky's. Together they published in 1935 a book about the restaurants of France, titled 'Les Fines Gueules de France'. This letter pertains to the research for that book. Maurice Edmond Sailland (October 12, 1872, Angers, France – July 22, 1956, Paris), better known by his pen-name Curnonsky and dubbed the Prince of Gastronomy, was the most celebrated writer on gastronomy in France in the 20th century. He wrote or ghost-wrote over 65 books and enormous numbers of newspaper columns. He is often considered the inventor of gastronomic motor-tourism as popularized by Michelin, though he himself could not drive. The contents of the letter display an ironic point of interest. Escoffier, one year before his death is offering a glimpse of the changes he is seeing to his beloved French cuisine. Having re-organised, during his life time, the French kitchen so fundamentally from that of the Bel-Epoque era he is still only really interested in viewing the changes from the chef's point of view. It is obvious that even at the grand old age of eighty eight, he is still active and well informed.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 10989

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste    
Ma Cuisine
Ma Cuisine AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER Translated from the French by VYVYAN HOLLAND Edited by MARION HOWELLS Foreward by ANDRE L. SIMON. PAUL HAMLYN. LONDON
Good D/W slightly chipped along the edges. Dark purple cloth cover and spine with blind tooling, gilt lettering and gilt outline of a cooking pot. 1fep. Half Title. [1] Title page. [1] 1pp Contents. [1] 7-9 Forward by A.L. Simon. 10-11 Preface. 12-13 Introduction by Escoffier. 14-15 Weights & Measures [1] 17-818. 819-884 Index. 1fep. A very good copy.
- Escoffier was eighty eighty years old when the first French edition of Ma Cuisine was published in 1934. He died the following year. The first English edition was published - 1965. This copy is the first English edition - second impression - 1966. A very impressive book aimed at the housewife. Containing over 2000 recipes, it is a monumental and important work. The Forward by Andre L. Simon is interesting for its very personal and endearing description of Escoffier and his qualities. An important addition to any collection of cookery books.

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Modern category
ref number: 11008

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - Signed by Escoffier, unusually in English.
A GUIDE TO MODERN COOKERY
BY A. ESCOFFIER OF THE CARLTON HOTEL WITH PORTRAIT NEW AND REVISED EDITION (with a printer's device and initials M.H.) LONDON WILLIAM HEINEMANN 1909
165x250mm. 1fep. Half title with signature in black ink "To Mr H. Fowler With best Compliments A. Escoffier London 16 Fevrier 1909" (with a very little light foxing). [1] Frontispiece of 'Escoffier' with tissue guard. Title Page. [1] (1)vi-x Preface. (1)xii Contents. (1)xiv-xvi Glossary. (1)1-848. [1p Index] [1] (1)852-891 Index. 1p Advertisements. 1fep. Original clean full green cloth binding with bright gilt writing and tooling on the spine and front cover with a slight rubbing to edges. The gutter inside is split but holding well. All edges green. Internally, clean and bright. Also enclosed is a beautifully produced four page 'Escoffier Ltd' promotional pamphlet and price list for all Escoffier Sauces, and we are also informed the Preparations can be obtained from all high-class Grocers and Stores. It has a fold in the middle and slight browning around the edges.
- The first English edition was published in 1907. This is the 3 imprint and the second English translation of the first French edition of 1903. At that time of publication, Escoffier was Maitre Chef de Cuisine of the Carlton Hotel, Pall Mall, London. His tenure there lasted 20 years, from 1899 - 1919. Nice clean original bound copies with the gilt lettering still bright are very scarce and with the unusual signature and the rare pamphlet - an altogether rare and handsome copy.

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Modern category
ref number: 11124

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - A fine copy of Escoffier's first book
Les Fleurs en Cire
A. ESCOFFIER LES FLEURS EN CIRE (An elaborate printers floral device) BIBLIOTHEQUE DE L'ART CULINAIRE 4 Place Saint-Michel, - PARIS MDCCCCX Nouvelle Edition
Fourth Edition, Paris, 1910. 188x141mm. 1fep. Half-Title. On verso Headpiece & printer's details for all editions. [1] Frontispiece. Title page on thick photographer's card and tissue guard. [1] (1)10-92. 3p Index. [1] 1fep. Original publisher's printed cover, in good condition. Internally very clean. Illustrations: Halftone frontispiece portrait of Escoffier and halftone illustrations titled "Fleurs de Magnolia en Cire" and 40 photo engraved illustrations in the text. A very nice untrimmed copy with many uncut pages. A very scarce and sought after book.
- This slim volume was originally published under the title 'Traite sur l'Art de Travailler les Fleurs en Cire' Paris, 1884. During this period Escoffier married Delphine Daffis, the daughter of a publisher. Writing poetry herself, she contributed to this publication. Escoffier was a major writer of culinary classics and is still consulted as an authority. Besides 'Les Fleurs en Cire', his other best known writings are --- 1903 - 'Le Guide Culinaire'; 1907 - 'A Guide to Modern Cookery', 1st english edition; 1910 - 'Les Fleurs en Cire', a new edition; 1911 - 'Le Carnet d'Epicure'; 1912 - 'Le Livre des Menus'; 1919 - 'L'Aide-Memoire Culiniare'; 1927 - 'Le Riz'; 1929 - 'La Morue'; 1934 - Ma Cuisine. This is a collectors item. Editions of this early work by Escoffier are very scarce and much sought after, especially in this fine original condition.

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Modern category
ref number: 11114

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - One of Escoffier's menus
A menu and a table plan. Carlton Hotel. Pall Mall. London.
1.-- A Dinner Plan of Tables. Thursday. July 21st 1910. 2.-- Special Dinner Menu. Monday. September 16th. 1918.
1. -- This card is decorated by a double gilt border, front and back. On the front is an emblem of the American flag and the Union Jack. It is a four page ‘Plan of Tables’ for a Dinner in honour of General Stuart L. Wilson at the Carlton Hotel, Thursday, July 21st 1910. Seated at the ‘Red Table’ is Lieut. Sir Ernst H. Shackleton who was to set out 4 years later on ‘Endurance’ for his ill-fated attempt to reach Antarctica. It has taped marks on the back, indicating it has been sometime mounted in a book. 2. -- The menu is for a special Dinner at the Carlton Hotel on Monday 16th September 1918. Hosted by the Hon. A.J. Balfour MP for His Excellency Monsieur Michalacopoulos. The menu has an embossed gilt crest of the Royal Coat of Arms. Mons. Andre Michalacopoulos was the President for the Counsel of Ministers and Minister for Greek Affairs and A.J. Balfour was British Prime Minister from 1902 – 1905. It is a nice clean menu card with a 2 page insert tied by a ribbon. Both are housed in a nice cardboard, marbled folder with a label on the front cover. Rare Escoffier ephemera items.
- Escoffier was Maitre Chef de Cuisine at the Carlton Hotel from 1899-1919. These two items are his, from the Carlton Hotel kitchen banqueting department.

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Ephemera category
ref number: 10993

Escoffier.   Georges Auguste     - Escoffier's first book; 'Wax Flowers'
Les Fleurs en Cire
A. ESCOFFIER LES FLEURS EN CIRE (An elaborate printers floral device) BIBLIOTHEQUE DE L'ART CULINAIRE 4 Place Saint-Michel, - PARIS MDCCCCX Nouvelle Edition
Fourth Edition, Paris, 1910. 188x141mm. 1fep. Half-Title. On verso Headpiece & printer's details for all editions. [1] Frontispiece. Title page on thick photographer's card and tissue guard. [1] (1)10-92. 3p Index. [1] 1fep. Original publisher's printed cover, in good condition. Internally very clean. Illustrations: Halftone frontispiece portrait of Escoffier and halftone illustrations titled "Fleurs de Magnolia en Cire" and 40 photo engraved illustrations in the text. A very nice untrimmed copy with many uncut pages. With the bookplate of the very famous Swedish chef and author, Tore Wretman. A very scarce and sought after book.
- It was originally published under the title 'Traite sur l'Art de Travailler les Fleurs en Cire' Paris, 1884. During this period Escoffier married Delphine Daffis, the daughter of a publisher. Writing poetry herself, she contributed to this, his first publication. Escoffier was a major writer of culinary classics and is still consulted as an authority. Besides the 1884 edition of - Le Traite sur L'art de Travailler les Fleurs en Cire, his other best known writings are --- 1903 - Le Guide Culinaire; 1907 - A Guide to Modern Cookery, 1st english edition; 1910 - Les Fleurs en Cire, a new edition; 1911 - Le Carnet d'Epicure; 1912 - Le Livre des Menus; 1919 - L'Aide-Memoire Culiniare; 1927 - Le Riz; 1929 - La Morue; 1934 - Ma Cuisine.

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Modern category
ref number: 10976

Evelyn.   John     - The first book about Salads
Acetaria
A DISCOURSE OF SALLETS. By J.E. S.R.S. Author of the Kalendarium. [A quotation in Greek from the Greek dramatist, Cratinus] 'It is in every man's power to season well' LONDON, Printed for B. Tooke at the Middle-Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1699.
FIRST EDITION. 1fep. Title Page with double lined border. 20pp.Dedication. 10pp.Preface 6pp.The Plan of a Royal Garden. 1-192. 2pp.Folding Table between 108-109. 35pp.Appendix. 13pp.Table. 1pp.Errata. [1] 1fep. All pages uniformly browned. Title page and first page of the dedication backed with clear page tape without visual loss of text. Very nice early full mottled calf binding, raised bands with gilt lines, dark orange label with gilt lettering. With a nice aged patina. Very rare.
- John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a prolific writer and translator, touching on politics, manners, and religion as well as the more practical arts of architecture, painting and engraving, sculpture, numismatics, and perhaps what he is best known for (besides his diary) gardening and forestry. His most important original contributions are perhaps 'Sylva' which he composed at the behest of the Royal Society in 1664. Acetaria is but a chapter in 'Sylva' subtitled 'A Discourse of Sallets'. Part of Evelyn's literary knowledge of the garden were his translations of the French horticultural manual by Nicolas de Bonnefons and the garden poem (in Latin) by Renatus Rapinaus. Acetaria is certainly full of observations of how the English ways, either in the garden or at table, differed from French, Italian and Spanish - with occasional reference to India, Germany, Holland, Africa and America for good measure. The text also underscores the relative novelty of some aspects of the art of kitchen-gardening in England: we had much to learn by way of cultural techniques from the Dutch and the French, as well as plants that were of recent introduction, for example the Dutch cabbages brought over by Sir Anthony Ashley.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10946

Fagan.   Louis    
1836 - 1886. The Reform Club:
ITS FOUNDERS AND ARCHITECT. BY LOUIS FAGAN, Of the Department of Prints and Drawings, the British Museum. Honorary Member of the Society of Engravers of France; Author of "The Life of Sir Anthony Panizzi, "K.C.B.;" "The Art of Michelangelo;" "Catalogue Raisonne of the Works of William Woollett;" "Collectors Marks," "Raphael's Sonnett;" etc., etc. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR. LONDON Bernard Quaritch, 15 PICCADILLY 1887.
Large 4vo. 1fep with frontis illustration of the Reform Club library on verso. The Title page in red and black text. The verso with a printers device. List of Illustrtions. [1] (1)vi-viii List of 143 illustrations. 1 page Preface by Louis Fagan. [1] (1)2-143. [1] (1)ii-xiii Index. [1] 1fep. Except for a little water-staining on the borders of the frontis, everything as new. The cover has been very sympathetically rebound recently in the same blue cloth cover as the original and the original gilt lettering on boards and spine. Almost as new.
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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11209

Farley.   John & Co-Partners.     - Superlatively rare, signed by Farley and two other directors.
An original Indenture for the London Tavern signed by John Farley the famous cook.
Signed individually by all parties, for “ a new partnership in the trade and business of a Vintner of and in the said House and Tavern called the London Tavern in Bishopsgate Street aforesaid for the Term of Seven Years”.
Two large vellum sheets - 711 x 838mm. Folded in typical indenture folds for filing and storage with top outer part showing in fine ink script, dated 1800 and Farley, Terry and Peacock’s names and their ‘Articles of Co-Partnership’. The exterior fold has some light soiling and browning to one outer edge where its has been stored on a shelf for many years, but internally its very clean. The beginning of the indenture has a large elaborate heading in ink and a good cursive hand is evident throughout the whole manuscript. The signatures of Farley, Terry and Peacock are at the bottom, each with a small red seal. Overall an excellent item.
- John Farley was the well-known Head Cook of the London Tavern whose famous cookery book ‘The London Art of Cookery’ was first published in 1783. When he started and finished his tenure there is hard to establish. We do know that his time at the London Tavern extended for many years, and he played a large role in its fine reputation and success. In Old Bailey trial accounts for the 16th September 1795, it is recorded that a man, Clark Hillard, was indicted on August the 4th for stealing from the London Tavern. The accusers, named as the directors of the Tavern, were John Bleadon, John Farley, Edward Terry and John Henry Peacock. Five years later John Bleadon has left and the three remaining directors have re-applied for, and been granted this Vintner’s licence on August 8th 1800, for a period of seven years at a cost of £1500.oo per annum. The document further states that the directors were fined £400.oo for letting the licence lapse on the June 29th of the same year. It appears the variance in lapse dates happened because John Bleadon had stepped down as a director. The license also notes that if there is going to be a change in the future Vintners partnership it should be done by the fourth year of its term. In John Timb’s book ‘Club Life of London’ we are informed The London Tavern was re-built on the western side of Bishops-gate Street Within on the site of the former White Lion Tavern, which burned down on November 7th 1765. It was completed by Richard B. Jupp, architect, and opened in September 1768. Taking up a large footprint on the site of the current Royal Bank of Scotland PLC, the Tavern was a huge building, 80ft wide and 70ft tall. It boasted many private dining rooms and a very large public room; the Great Dining Room or 'Pillar Room', measuring 40x33 feet. On the floor above was the Ballroom measuring 33 feet in width and extending the whole length of the building. This room could also be converted to a banqueting room that would hold 300 dining guests. The room also had two galleries at each end to allow 150 ladies as spectators. An unusual concept!? After doing further research I could not find any other facts that confirmed this was a common setup in other eating establishments. This strengthens though, the fact that dining out in Taverns and Clubs was the domain of men only. (This setup would only be truly broken when Cesar Ritz designed and run his famous Hotels in the latter part of the nineteenth century for the exclusive comfort of women, in the sure and very astute understanding that when the women came to dine, the men would follow, with the inevitable desire to book rooms as well.) Not only did the London Tavern have many floors, it also had many levels in its basement, which even stretched under the adjoining buildings on both sides. One of basement floors had a number of huge vats installed, that each held two tons of live Turtles. We are further informed that if the Turtles are kept in the same water as they were shipped in they will survive very well for 3 months. To change the water would lessen the weight and flavour of the animal. This beautifully written Vintners license covered a huge cellar. Timb’s description states that the cellar covered one huge basement storey, filled with barrels of Porter, pipes of Port, butts of Sherry etc. There were labyrinth walls of bottles and a huge region of bins, six bottles deep; described as the catacombs of Johannisberg, Tokay and Burgandy. Also in storage, 1200 Champagne, 700 Claret and thousands of genial wines. We are informed those wines also absorb an interest of 5% per annum. All over this vast wine store Timb’s quaintly describes “floors with rivers of sawdust”. The final chapter in the story of The London Tavern happened around 1910 when it was demolished. After 142 years of being one of the most famous and prestigious grand City restaurants, its name was appropriated by the proprietors of the nearby King's Head Tavern in Fenchurch St. Finally, this exceptionally rare, large Indenture is a fantastic piece of ephemera, not only because of Falrley’s rare signature, but as a glimpse of what a serious business it was to be granted and hold a Vintners license in eighteenth century England.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11217